Part 15 | History of Outagamie County, Wisconsin. Thomas Henry Ryan. Part 16 | Part 17

EMIL AUL, one of Outagamie county's progressive and enterprising young agriculturists, cultivating the soil on a farm of 103 acres located in Grand Chute township, was born September 10, 1879, in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, a son of Frederick and Molly (Metge) Aul, natives of Germany. Frederick Aul was born in June, 1854, and came to the United States in 1870, locating first at Erie, Pennsylvania, where for about three years he was engaged in railroad work. He then came to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, where he continued at the same occupation until he purchased a farm in Kaukauna township, residing thereon for about twenty years and then moving into the city of Kaukauna, where he now lives. He married Molly Metge, who was born December 30, 1860, and they had four children, namely: Emil; Ida, the wife of Henry Kruss, residing on the old Aul homestead; Emma, wife of Emil Wolf, residing in Brillion, Wisconsin; and Freddie, who resides with his parents and attends school. Emil Aul received his education in school district No. 10, Calumet county, and since he was fifteen years of age he has made his own way in the world, beginning at that time to work as a bridge carpenter and continuing as such for six years. He then followed locomotive firing for two years, but finding.this work too heavy for him bought the farm on which he now operates, a tract of 103 acres which he devotes to general farming and dairying. His whole attention is now given to his farm, which is in a high state of cultivation, and he is rapidly becoming one of the substantial men of his township. He was married November 5, 1907, to Freda Doering, born in Kaukauna, February 25, 1889, daughter of Gustave and Gusta (Auchie Koskey) Doering, the former born in Germany June 28, 1860, and the latter in January 22, 1864. In early life Mr. Doering was a moulder, and on first coming to this country in 1882 he followed that trade at Kaukauna. About four years later he went to Duluth, Minnesota, where he continued at his trade for about six years, but eventually returned to Kaukauna, where he became a machinist, and as such is now employed by the Northwestern Railroad. Mr. and Mrs. Doering had the following children: Otto and William, papermakers of Kaukauna; Freda; Walter and Arnold, attending school, and six children deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Aul have had two children: Vera Gustie Elsie, born September 4, 1908; and Erna Ella Elsie, born November 6, 1909. Mr. Aul votes the republican ticket.

JOHN F. BERG, who is now living practically retired after many years spent in agricultural pursuits in Outagamie county, is one of Grand Chute township's representative citizens. He was born in Buffalo, New York, March 27, 1853, a son of John and Elizabeth (Webber) Berg, natives of Luxemburg, Germany, where the former was born December 21, 1824, and the latter December 21, 1828. They were married in Germany, February 19, 1848, and during that year came to the United States, first settling in Buffalo, New York, where the father engaged at his trade of carpenter and joiner. Mrs. Berg died there in 1854, and during the following year Mr. Berg came to Wisconsin, settling on a farm in Fond du Lac county, on which he continued to operate until his death, November 13, 1910. He became a prominent man in that section, was a notary public for forty-five years, and held local offices almost continuously. By his first wife Mr. Berg had three children, of whom John F. was the youngest, and by a second marriage twelve children were born. John F. Berg attended school in the town of Ashford, Wisconsin, and by the time he had reached seventeen years of age had learned the carpenter trade with his father, an occupation which he followed for others until 1876. He then began to work at carpenter contracting, which he continued for thirteen years, and in 1889, bought the old homestead of his wife's family, near Hortonville, on which he lived until 1898. In this year he sold out, and moved to Greenville township, but after four years there came to the farm which he now operates, a tract of 123 acres. This is now being operated by his sons, as Mr. Berg has practically retired from all activities. He is a democrat in politics, and for some years served as justice of the peace. His religious connection is with St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church at Appleton. On January 9, 1879, Mr. Berg was married to Anna Steffen, born at Hortonville, Wisconsin, November 6, 1859, daughter of Ignatz and Mary (Bongert) Steffen, the former born February 14, 1833, and the latter January 29, 1831, both in Luxemburg, Germany. They came to America about 1854, and located in Hortonville, near where Mr. Steffen was engaged in farming during the remainder of his life, his death occurring February 14, 1907. Mrs. Steffen still resides at Hortonville. They had three children, of whom Mrs. Berg was the oldest. Mr. and Mrs. Berg have had seven children: Ignatz G., a farmer of Grand Chute township, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work; Laura. E., born September 17, 1883, wife of Louis Sager, manager of Potts & Wood Creamery, Appleton; Fred W., born November 18, 1886, living on the farm in Grand Chute township, married Alice Langenberg, and has one child, Marcella, born May 31, 1910; Elmer J., born February 5, 1891, single, and residing with his parents; and Leo N., born June 1, 1895; Louis A., born June 1, 1896, and Harold M., born February 10, 1898, residing at home.

LOUIE EICK, who is a substantial citizen of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, owning considerable improved farm land in section 8, Osborn township, on which he carries on general farming and stockraising, was born October 11, 1872, at Appleton, Wisconsin. His parents were William Jacob and Wilhelmina (Sylvester) Eick. The mother died in 1910, aged seventy-nine years, two months and thirteen days, and the father in 1890, aged fifty-three years. William Jacob Eick was one of the early investors in land in Osborn township. After working for some years at Appleton, in 1870 he bought a tract of eighty acres of wild land in Osborn township although it was two years before he could begin to clear it. He worked for the railroad during this period and then at Seymour, and the old hut in which he lived during this time he later tore down and built a very presentable frame house on a second tract of forty acres, also wild land, just across the road, which he purchased in 1886. Here he also started to erect substantial buildings and finished a stone hog pen with cement floor and trough, an up-to-date building, the year before he died. When he started his farm operations it was with one cow and a yoke of oxen and at death he owned a herd of fine cattle. He was an industrious, provident man and was a worthy member of the Lutheran Church.

Louie Eick obtained a district school education and afterward became a farmer and stockraiser. He bought eighty acres of the homestead to which he later added twenty more and still later an additional forty acres. The sons together built the residence in 1898, but Mr. Eick himself erected the 40x80-foot basement barn. He was married October 6, 1910, to Tillie Sachs, whose parents reside in Black Creek township.

AUGUST KOLLETH, who is a substantial retired farmer of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and a highly respected resident of Osborn township, living in section 17, where he owns 100 acres of land, was born in Germany, March 31, 1847, and is a son of Charles and Fredericka (Mielhan) Kolleth. The family came to the United States in 1873, locating first at Green Bay, Wisconsin, moving then to Germantown and subsequently to Black Creek township. There the father died in 1895, aged eighty-three years, the mother surviving until 1909, when aged ninety-six years. She was born in Pomerania, Germany, a daughter of Ludwick and Caroline (Kauferman) Meilhan. Her brothers and sisters were: Wilhelmina, Ludwick, Ferdinand, Frederick, Hannah, August and two others who died in Germany. The children of Charles and Frederica Kolleth were: Frank, who married Lena Ponkropt; Emil, who married Jennie Dixon; Anna, who married Bernard Spangberg; Edward, who married Emma Bootz; August, who married Cora Eick; Lena, who married Charles Pelier; Lizzie, who married Alfred Hurst; and Ott, who never married. For three years after coming to America, August Kolleth was employed as a farm hand near Menominee Falls, where he married, and then moved to Black Creek township and located on a tract of forty acres, where his first residence was nothing but a sheep stable. Better conditions were soon brought about, however, and he not only cleared this land but put up a comfortable house and lived on that place for seven years. He then secured 100 acres of wild land in section 17, his present place, one-half of which had been partly cleared. He cormpleted the clearing and in the course of years developed his present productive farm and also erected a commodious house with ten rooms, and a basement barn of 36x88 feet in dimensions. During his active years he worked hard but now rents the farm to his son, August Kolleth.

MICHAEL M. LOCKERY, sheriff of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and a well known business man of Appleton, where he has resided for about seventeen years, was born August 15, 1863, in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, son of Cornelius and Jane (Gardner) Lochery. Cornelius Lochery, who was a lumberman and contractor, came to Oshkosh from the state of Maine, and in 1876 moved his family to Bovina township, Outagamie county, where he bought and improved a farm, continuing to reside there until his death, January 5, 1899. His widow still survives, making her home in Appleton. She is a faithful member of the Catholic Church, and has been the mother of eight children: Mary, who married H. H. Muller; Mrs. L. A. Blackman of Lewiston, Idaho; James E., a resident of Minnesota; Michael M.; Cornelius, of Oshkosh; William, twin of Cornelius, a resident of Appleton; Mrs. Harry Ames, residing in Appleton; and Mrs. George Ames, of Lewiston, Idaho. Michael M. Lockery received a public school education in Bovina township, and remained on the home farm until he reached the age of seventeen years, when he started in river driving and lumbering, which kept him occupied during the next fourteen years and gave him a strong frame and vigorous constitution. After leaving the river, Mr. Lockery opened a hotel and livery at Shiocton, where he continued in business for three years, after which he came to Appleton and engaged in a livery business, this being in 1894. After six years he sold his livery to engage in the real estate business, in which he has continued to the present time, and he also for five years was closely identified with the furniture trade. He also owns an excellent farming property in Outagamnie county. Mr. Lockery has always been prominent in democratic politics, and for four years he served as alderman. In 1906 he was, given the democratic nomination for sheriff of Outagamie county, and was elected by a majority of 968 votes, and in 1910, when again nominated, polled 1,362 more votes than his republican opponent. Sheriff Lockery's career as an official has been as clean as that as a private citizen; and many of the qualities that made his business enterprises prosper have been brought into play to make his public affairs successful. Fraternally, he is connected with the Eagles, the Elks, the Odd Fellows and the Order of the Moose.

On April 16, 1891, Sheriff Lockery was united in marriage with Alvina Lock, daughter of William and Eliza (Swerge) Lock, of Outagamie county, and two children have been born to this union: Ralph and Ethel.

HERMAN SCHEIBE, who is the proprietor of a horseshoeing and blacksmithing establishment at Apple Creek, in Grand Chute township, was born near Milwaukee, in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, February 20, 1861, a son of Edward and Sophia (Ohrenberger) Scheibe. Edward Scheibe was born in the Province of Saxony, Germany, April 1, 1833, and early in life learned the butcher trade. On coming to America in 1853, he followed that trade for about four years in Milwaukee, and then located on farming land in Milwaukee county. In 1871 he purchased a farm in Freedom township, where he is still residing with his sons. Mr. Scheibe, who is now living retired, is a veteran of the Civil War. He married Sophia Ohrenberger, who was born in Wittenberg, Germany, May 3, 1839, and she died April 13, 1900, having been the mother of nine children: Reynold, residing on the old homestead; Herman; John, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Emma, wife of John Westtreicher, a merchant of Evanston, Illinois; Laura, deceased; Edward, residing in Freedom township; Robert, also in Freedom township; Gustave, a merchant of Evanston, Illinois; and Ida, who is deceased. Herman Scheibe's educational training was secured in the district schools of Freedom township, and until he was past twenty years of age he worked on the home farm. At this time he learned the trade of blacksmith and located at Five Corners, in Osborn township, but after three and one-half years came to Apple Creek, where he has since carried on horseshoeing and general blacksmith work, in addition to engaging in the carriage business. He has built up a large trade no less through his own personal popularity than through the excellence of his work. He is a member of the E. F. U., is a republican in politics, and his religious views are those of the Moravian Church of Freedom township.

On May 1, 1884, Mr. Scheibe was married to Amelia Doebler, born July 10, 1881, in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, the estimable daughter of John and Mariah Doebler, natives of Wittenberg, Germany, where the father was born January 4, 1821, and the mother in 1816. They came to America about 1858, locating first in Chicago, and then removing to Milwaukee, from whence, in 1869, they removed to Freedom township. There the father died in 1884, and Mrs. Doebler has resided with Mr. and Mrs. Scheibe since that time. Mrs. Scheibe is the next to the youngest of a family of thirteen children.

MATHIAS LANSER, who has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in Outagamie county for a number of years, is the owner of a fine tract of ninety-five acres of farming land in Grand Chute township, where he makes his home, and also owns forty acres in Freedom township and twenty acres in Black Creek township, all under cultivation. Mr. Lanser was born May 10, 1859, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a son of John and Anna (Schmitt) Lanser, both of whom came from Germany and were married in Milwaukee. Mr. Lanser arrived in this country about 1850, locating first in New York State, where he worked for some time, and in 1853 located in Milwaukee. After about seven years he located on the farm now owned by his son Mathias in Grand Chute township, which he had purchased about five years previous to this time, and here he continued to reside until his death, September 20, 1889, Mrs. Lanser having passed away in 1867. Mathias was the second of their six children. Mathias Lanser received but limited educational advantages, they being principally composed of four months' schooling in Appleton, but during his life by considerable reading and careful observation he has gained a good education. He was married November 13, 1888, to Elizabeth Fox, who was born in Brown county, Wisconsin, February 18, 1865 daughter of Peter Fox. Mr. Fox was born in Rhein Province, Germany, September 4, 1837, and came to America in 1855 with his parents on an old sailboat which took forty-six days to complete the trip. The family remained in New York City a short time and then came to Washington county, Wisconsin, settling on a sixty-acre farm. Peter Fox worked for others in that vicinity about two years, and then walked to Wrightstown, Brown county, where he bought forty acres of land, and soon thereafter was married to Anna Shomer, who was born in Germany in 1840. Two children were born to this union, Elizabeth being the youngest, and Mrs. Fox passed away three years after Mrs. Lanser's birth. In 1863 Mr. Lanser was married to Maggie Hin, also a native of Germany, and to this union there were born four children. Mr. Fox left Brown county in 1865, just after the close of the Civil War, and came to Freedom township, where he purchased sixty acres of land, and here he continued to reside until 1901, in which year he came to live with Mr. and Mrs. Lanser. Mr. Fox served as a State Guard during the Civil War, being a member of the Twenty-second Wisconsin Volunteers, and was mustered out at Madison in May, 1865.

Mathias Lanser lived with his father until twenty-nine years of age, at which time he was married, and continued to operate the old homestead for one year. At the time of his father's death, he bought the interest of the other heirs, and here he has continued to engage in general farming to the present time. He and Mrs. Lanser have had these children: Peter, born September 23, 1889; Nicholas, born September 23, 1891; Maggie, born October 4, 1893; John, born June 25, 1895; Annie, born October 20, 1897; George, born October 30, 1899; Henry, born December 15, 1901; Freddie, born May 17, 1906; and Eveline born January 10, 1910.

LOUIS E. NICHOLS, well and favorably known as one of the progressive farmers and public-spirited citizens of Ellington township, Outagamie county, is a native of Center township, born October 5, 1865, on the farm of his father, Nelson Nichols, who was born at Sacket Harbor, Jefferson county, New York. He came west in 1861, settling in Center township, where for upwards of forty years he was engaged in farming. Mr. Nichols married Catherine McLaughlin, a native of Canada, and they became the parents of twelve children. Louis E. Nichols received a district school education, later attending Ryan High school in Appleton, and for the nine years that followed he was engaged in the profession of school teaching in Outagamie and Florence counties. Mr. Nichols then gave up teaching and purchased his father's farm in Center township, on which he operated until 1903, when he purchased the farm which he is now operating in Ellington township. A comfortable residence and commodious barn are among the many improvements he has made upon this property, which repays him well for all the labor he has put upon it, and which is necessary to conduct it properly. In addition to raising general farm products he pays considerable attention to dairying. In 1890, Mr. Nichols was married to Mary Wallace, daughter of Anthony and Mary Wallace of Ellington township, and ten children have been born to this union: Catherine, Patrick, Aloysius, Gertrude Mary, Julia, Veronica, Alice, Jane and Louis, of whom Catherine died when one year old. Mr. and Mrs. Nichols belong to the Catholic Church at Stephensville. He has been active in public matters, serving as town clerk in Center township for three years, and a like period as township chairman since coming to Ellington township.

EARL W. DOUGLAS, D. D. S., a well known member of the dental profession of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who has the distinction of being the oldest practicing dental-surgeon in Appleton, was born in Albany, New York, February 7, 1852, and is a son of Byron and Sarah L. (Woodward) Douglas. Dr. Byron Douglas, who was the first practicing dentist of Appleton, was born July 30, 1824, in Albany, New York, the eldest of the four children born to Beriah Douglas and his second wife, and nephew of Dr. Stephen Douglas, who was the father of Stephen A. Douglas. Beriah Douglas, himself a dentist of New York, was a son of Beriah Douglas who came from Scotland to the United States in the early pioneer Colonial days. Dr. Byron Douglas attended the common schools and academy of Albany, after leaving which he took up the study of dentistry with his father, and after leaving the latter's office formed a partnership with his half brother. In 1852 he came to Appleton, and for a time was employed in the general store of his father-in-law, Mr. Woodward, accepting such cases in his profession as he could find until 1855, when he opened offices. He thus became the first practicing dentist in Appleton, and the first to follow the profession exclusively in this portion of the State, and here he became one of the best known dentists in this part of Wisconsin, being for fourteen years treasurer of the Wisconsin Dental Society and a life member of that organization. He was also a member of the American Dental Society and of the Odd Fellows. In 1856 he was elected to the office of county treasurer, in which position he served for four years, and six years later was sent to the General Assembly. He took an active interest in all matters, whether pertaining to his profession or to affairs of a religious, social or industrial nature, and was one of the promoters and first stockholders of the Ashland division of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad. He retired from active professional duties in 1893, and his death occurred March 29, 1908, his widow surviving until 1910. On April 2, 1849, Dr. Byron Douglas was united in marriage with Miss Sarah L. Woodward, daughter of John W. Woodward, an early settler of Menominee Falls, and three children were born to this union, Earl W. being the only survivor.

Earl W. Douglas received his education in the public schools, and after graduating from Lawrence University studied dentistry under his father, whom he had succeeded in practice. Dr. Douglas has been engaged in active practice since he was fifteen years old, and his patients include many of the leading families of Appleton. He is a member of the Odd Fellows and the Elks, and of the National, State and County dental associations. In April, 1872, Dr. Douglas was married to Miss Alice Berry, of Grand Rapids, Michigan, who died in 1893.

ISAAC A. ABRAHAMS, one of the younger generation of business men of Outagamie county, who has already demonstrated his ability to take his place in the front rank of the progressive and successful men of his section of the country, is a native of Russia, where he was born August 22, 1886, a son of Benjamin and Mollie (Jacobs) Abrahams.

Benjamin Abrahams, who was a native of Russia, attended school there until reaching the age of twenty-one years, when he embarked in a mercantile business. In 1888, believing that he could find a better field for his ability in America, he left his native country and in the same year arrived at Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he at once engaged in buying hides and furs. Two years later he had earned enough to send for his wife and two children, Isaac A. and his brother David L., the latter of whom is now a resident of Milwaukee. Mr. Abrahams is still engaged in business in Green Bay, his wife also surviving, and to them have been born the following children in the United States: George, Charles, Peter, Mary, Abraham and Florence, all living at home with their parents.

Isaac A. Abrahams received his early education in the grammar schools, and later he attended the Green Bay Business College. He came to Seymour in 1906 and opened a fur and produce establishment, which won favor from the start, the first year's business amounting to from $75,000 to $100,000. Mr. Abrahams now does a wholesale business all over the United States and Canada, seeking the markets from the Atlantic to the Pacific in the disposal of his products, which consist principally of hides, pelts, furs, wool, cabbage, butter, eggs, etc., and his business during 1910 aggregated from $400,000 to $500,000. He is a stockholder in the Seymour State Bank, and has always supported any movement which he has believed will be of benefit to the city, being at present vice-president of the Seymour Business Men's Association. Fraternally, he is connected with Depere Lodge of Masons No. 85; Seymour Lodge No. 273, Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Seymour Camp of the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Furriers' Union. In his political views he is a republican.

In 1907 Mr. Abrahams was married to Ella Kanter, who was born May 15, 1889, in Russia, the daughter of A. Kanter of Gillett, Oconto county, Wisconsin, and to this union there have been born the following children: Celia, Mollie, Tillie, Ena, Harry, Dora, Benjamin, Joseph and David.

FREDERICK ORT, an industrious young farmer of Ellington township, Outagamie county, who is engaged in cultivating 10 acres of good land along scientific lines, is a native of Germany, and was born September 17, 1872, a son of John and Mary (Teise) Ort, natives of the Fatherland. John Ort brought his family to the United States in 1877, coming direct to Wisconsin and settling in Freedom township, where he lived for two years. He then went to Winnebago county for two years, after which he located in Ellington township, buying land and engaging in farming until his retirement, since which time he has resided in Freedom, where his wife is also living. They had a family of three children. Mr. Ort is a veteran of the Franco-Prussian War. Frederick Ort received his education in the district schools in the vicinity of his father's farm, attending until he was seventeen years old and working on his father's farm and the neighboring tracts and giving his earnings to his father until he was twenty-one years old. In 1897 he was married to Ellen Pingle, of Appleton, daughter of Charles and Mary Pingle, and after his marriage lived in Appleton for two years, working by the month. He then rented a farm in Grand Chute township for two years, and in 1901 bought his present splendid farm of 160 acres, on which he has since carried on mixed farming and dairy work. In 1907 he built a fine, new modern residence, and he is at present erecting some large barns. He is an adherent of the use of scientific methods in cultivating his land, and the success which has met his efforts justifies his beliefs. He and Mrs. Ort are members of the German Lutheran church of Ellington, and he is independent in his political views. He has had seven children: Marie, Edward, Harold, Lucile, Vera, Bernice and John, the last two being twins.

MARK CATLIN. To those who have been interested in athletics to any extent during the past decade, the name of Mark Catlin is a familiar one, for during a number of years the prowess of this young athlete was a matter of almost daily mention in the newspapers, and although he is now engaged in the more serious business of the law, he still retains his interest in his former diversion with advantage to himself and to his pupils in the capacity of instructor in physical training and athletics at Lawrence University, Appleton, Wisconsin. Mr. Catlin was born November 12, 1881, in Kane county, Illinois, a son of Frank and Ida (McDole) Catlin, natives of Illinois. Frank Catlin has owned about 2,000 acres of land in Wisconsin, where he is a well known stockman, and for the past twelve years has been located at Ashland. He had five sons, namely: Louis, deceased, who was an attorney; Mark; George, a Wisconsin agriculturist; Frank, who is attending the University of Chicago; and Ira, attending high school. Mark Catlin entered the University of Chicago after attending the public and high schools of his native locality, and here he soon became famous as an athlete, being captain of the football team that defeated Michigan's mighty football machine in the fall of 1905, but that he did not let his athletic activities interfere with his studies is evidenced by the fact that during the same year he graduated from the university with the degree of Ph. B. For a time he was located at the University of Iowa as a professor, during which time he was engaged in studying law, and in the spring of 1909 he was graduated from the law department with the degree of L. L. B. During September of the same year, Mr. Catlin was admitted to the bar, and since that time has been engaged in the practice of his profession at Appleton. During Mr. Catlin's athletic career he participated in events all over the country, including the Olympic Meet at St. Louis, in 1904, and his collection of medals and trophies for superiority on the track is a notable one. He is now secretary of the Commercial Club of Appleton, an organization boasting of 300 members. He is also a member of the Phi Delta Theta and the Phi Delta Phi, fraternities of the University of Chicago, and of the Knights of Pythias and the Elks. With his wife he attends the Congregational church, and in political matters he is not bound down by party lines.

On April 14, 1906, Mr. Catlin was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Blanchard, who at that time was a, teacher at the Chicago Art Institute, and they have had two sons; John and Mark, Jr.

HENRY SAGER, the owner of a fine farm of eighty acres located in Greenville township, Outagamie county, was born on his present property October 28, 1855, a son of Henry and Mary (Grote) Sager. Mr. Sager's parents, who were natives of Germany, came to the United States about 1853, settling near Milwaukee, where they resided for about two years, and then moving to Greenville township and buying this farm, Mr. Sager spending the rest of his life in its cultivation and dying in 1880, while his widow survived him unitl 1893. They had a family of eight children, of whom six are living, and Henry was the fifth in order of birth. He attended the district schools of Greenville township, and until he was married he worked for his parents. After that event he purchased the home place, and here he has since resided, being engaged in general farming and raising stock for his own use. He owns a fine large residence, substantial barn and good outbuildings, and has his property neatly graded and well fenced. In November, 1878, Mr. Sager was married to Miss Mary Kanock, who was born in Germany, October 12, 1864, daughter of Christ and Mary Kanock, who brought her to America when she was twelve years old and settled in Greenville township, where they became farmers and land owners. Both are now retired. To Mr. and Mrs. Sager there have been born ten children: Paulina, the wife of August Buchholtz, a resident of Appleton; Louis and Fred, who reside in Appleton and are employed in a creamery; Henry, who is employed in an Appleton paper mill; and Mamie, Johnnie, Otto and Walter, who reside at home; and two children who are deceased. Mr. Sager is a consistent member of the Lutheran church, and in political matters he is independent. He has never engaged actively in politics, having always preferred to give his full time and attention to his farm.

HENRY SYLVESTER HELLER, a. substantial farmer of Greenville township, where he owns a well cultivated tract of thirty acres, has traveled extensively through the United States and Canada, but for the past few years has devoted his entire attention to his farm. He was born in Waukesha county, Wisconsin, near Milwaukee, September 1, 1857, and is a son of Henry and Eva, (Klitz) Heller, natives of Germany. Mr. Heller's parents were married in the old country, and came to America in 1848, locating in Waukesha county, on a farm, on which they lived until 1862 or 1863, at which time they sold out and moved to Neenah, Wisconsin, near which place Mr. Heller purchased a farm. Here they lived until the latter years of their lives when they moved to the city of Neenah. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom Henry S. was the seventh born. He attended the public and Catholic schools at Neenah, and when only nine years of age he commenced working in the Neenah Stove Factory for a Mr. Brown. When he was fifteen years of age he left home and started out to make his own way in the world, his first employment being shingle making, and later he spent several years in the lumber camps. Later he became cook in the large camps of the Wisconsin woods, was employed in the same capacity on the lake steamers, and eventually became chef in the Vivian Hotel at Antigo, Wisconsin. He followed farming during the summer months and working as a cook during the winters for about twenty-five years, and in 1884 bought a farm near Antigo, which he cleared and improved. After living thereon for a long period, Mr. Heller took a trip through Canada and the Western States, including Texas and New Mexico, but not being able to securea suitable location, he returned to Wisconsin and bought his present farm of thirty acres in Greenville township, Outagamie county, where he has since carried on general farming and dairying. Mr. Heller is a member of the Roman Catholic church at Appleton, and in political matters is a democrat. He has served on the township board, and while residing at Antigo was assessor for several years. democrat. On July 4, 1883, he was married to Josephine Fellio, born at Appleton, Wisconsin, April 29, 1862, daughter of John and Bertha ( --------) Fellio, the former a native of Canada of French descent, and the latter of ----------- Mr. Fellio was a very early settler of Outagamie county, owned land near Sherwood, Wisconsin, and later at Seymour, and eventually moved to Appleton, where he now resides. He is a mason by trade, and a veteran of the Civil War, in which he served as a member of a Wisconsin regiment. Mrs. Heller was the fourth child of her parents' family of seven. She and Mr. Heller have had nine children; Laura, the wife of Louis Tesendorf, of Antigo, Wisconsin; Arthur, residing in Portland, Oregon; Lottie, the wife of James Chirff, a farmer of Antigo, Wisconsin; Pearl, Florence, and Helen, who are single and reside at home; and three children who died in infancy.

CARLOS M. BRAINERD, one of Outagamie's old and honored citizens, now living retired in the city of Appleton, is a member of a family that has been noted in military circles for three generations, his grandfather having been a Revolutionary soldier, his father a soldier in the War of 1812, and he himself a veteran of the great Civil War, through which he served with faithfulness and bravery, admirably sustaining the record of this old and respected family. Mr. Brainerd was born January 17, 1838, in Lewis county, New York, and is a son of Asher and Clarissa (Palmer) Brainerd, the former a native of Connecticut and the latter of New York. The Brainerd family came from England in 1669 and settled in New England, from whence members enlisted in the Revolutionary War. Asher Brainerd, who was a brother of the Rev. Thomas Brainerd of Philadelphia, went as a young man from Connecticut to New York, was there married, and spent the remainder of his life in the Empire State. Later his widow came to Wisconsin, where her death occurred. They were the parents of fifteen children, of whom twelve grew to maturity. Carlos M. Brainerd received his early education in the public schools of New York, later attending Glens Falls Academy, and he was engaged in farming at the time of the outbreak of the Civil War. In May, 1862, he enlisted in the 118th New York Volunteers, with which organization he served until the close of the war, and at the time of his discharge had attained the rank of sergeant. He served his country faithfully, and endured imprisonment for four months during his service. In the fall of 1865 he came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, locating in Black Creek township at a time when there were but five voters here, and taking up wild land. This he cleared and devoted to farming and stockraising, and at the time of his retirement was the owner of 160 acres of finely improved land. In 1890 he sold his farm and moved to Appleton, where he has since resided. Mr. Brainerd has taken an active part in the development of this part of the state, and his fellow-townsmen have expressed their appreciation of his worth as a citizen by electing him to every office in the township, in all of which he has served faithfully and capably. From 1874 he served continuously for seven years as chairman of the township board, and during his incumbency of that office many beneficent innovations were introduced that meant for the welfare of the township in both industrial and agricultural ways. He is independent in his political views, with republican tendencies. He is a popular comrade of the Grand Army of the Republic.

Mr. Brainerd was married (first) to Frances A. Seelye, of New York, who died in 1888, and he then married his first wife's sister, Mrs. Cynthia Stray, whose death occurred May 25, 1907. He has three children: Mrs. Sassman and Mrs. Granely, twins, and Elwin, a resident of St. Paul, Minnesota.

CORNELIUS VAN OUDENHOVEN, who in addition to being the owner and operator of a fine forty-acre farm in Grand Chute township, is extensively engaged in the manufacture of cheese, was born in what is now Vandenbroek (then Kaukauna) township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, March 4, 1863, a son of Theodore and Mary (Van Hammond) Van Oudenhoven. Theodore Van Oudenhoven was born in Holland in 1815, and came to the United States in 1849, and his wife was born in the same country May 30, 1834, and emigrated to this country in 1851. The father located first at Detroit, Michigan, but after a short time removed to the copper fields, where he remained about one year, after which he came to Outagamie county and purchased a farm in Kaukauna township, on which he continued to operate until his death, December 20, 1890. His widow survived him until March 3, 1907. Cornelius Van Oudenhoven was the sixth child of his parents' family of fourteen, and his education was secured in school district No. 8, Kaukauna township. He was married June 6, 1894, to Anna Janssen, who was born in that township, June 4, 1873, daughter of John and Mary (Nussbaum) Janssen, the former born in Holland, September 22, 1844, and the latter in Germany, May 25, 1843. Mr. Janssen came to America in 1844, with his parents, the family settling in what was then Kaukauna township, and he grew to maturity on a farm in that locality. Later he himself became a landowner in Kaukauna township, and engaged in farming there until 1898, when he settled on a little tract of seven acres, which was his home until 1910. He then removed to Little Chute, and is now living retired in that village. Mr. Van Oudenhoven worked on the home farm with his father until he had reached his twenty-sixth year, when he went to the state of Oregon, working there as a farm hand for two years and then returning to the home farm for a like period. At this time he was married and rented a part of the old homestead, later buying his present property of forty acres, a part of which was his father's at one time. He operates this in a scientific way and makes a specialty of dairy farming. In 1906 Mr. Van Oudenhoven built a cheese factory with a capacity of 10,000 pounds of milk, and he received generally six or seven thousand pounds daily, manufacturing a high grade of American cheese which he markets in Appleton on the dairy board. His factory is equipped with the most modern appliances and his special brands are "Twins"' "Langham" and "Young America," making what the market seems to need. Mr. Van Oudenhoven is an expert in his line, and his product meets with a ready sale.

Mr. and Mrs. Van Oudenhoven have had nine children, born as follows: Mary. born May 26, 1895; Theodore, July 9, 1896; Katharine, April 21, 1898; Anthony, March 26, 1899; Minnie, November 9, 1901; Anna, August 23, 1903; Rosella, April 17, 1905; George, September 9, 1906; Christina, December 25, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Van Oudenhoven are members of the Little Chute Roman Catholic Church. He is a democrat in politics, and has served two years as assessor.

FRANK F. TRETTIEN, who during the past twenty-five years has been identified with the farming interests of Ellington township, Outagamie county, is a native of this township, and was born on the farm which he now operates, July 19, 1861, a son of Christian Fred and Caroline (Schutter) Trettien. Christian Fred Trettien was born in Germany, and came to the United States when a young man, settling first in the State of New York, where he purchased land and lived for five years. While there he was married to Caroline Schutter, also a native of Germany, and they had one son, Charles, born in New York. In 1854 Mr. Trettien sold his Eastern property and brought his family to Wisconsin, settling in Outagamie county, where he bought the land now owned by his son Frank F., at that time a tract of heavy timber on which no improvements had been made. The rest of his life was spent on this property, and here his death occurred March 24, 1891, his widow surviving him until May 31, 1903. They had nine children, all of whom are living except one, William, who died in infancy. Frank F. Trettien attended the district schools of Ellington township and when twenty-two years of age went to South Dakota and took 160 acres of land to homestead, returning to this county three years later to rent his father's farm, which he bought five years later. Here he has since carried on mixed farming and dairying, and he raises some live stock for his own use. On April 22, 1891, Mr. Trettien was married to Miss Emma Herrmann, who was born in Greenville township, Outagamie county, April 6, 1868, the third day after the arrival from Germany of her parents, Carl and Fredericka Herrmann. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Trettien, namely: Walter, born April 28, 1892; and Harry, born November 27, 1899, both at home. Mr. and Mrs. Trettien are members of the German Lutheran Church of Ellington township.

JOHN MEIDAM, a well-known resident. of Grand Chute township, has been engaged in carpenter work here for nearly forty years, and now carries on this business as a contractor, having built up a large and lucrative trade. Born December 16, 1850, in Appleton. Mr. Meidam is a son of William and Louisa (Van Henklom) Meidam, natives of Amsterdam, Holland, the father born January 10, 1819, and the mother in June, 1831. They came to America in 1847, and went direct to Milwaukee, where for one year Mr. Meidam worked in a brick yard, and then located in Appleton, where he built a small house. Here he resided for about two years, during which time he was employed by Reeder Smith, and at the end of this time bought a thirty-two-acre farm in Grand Chute township, on the Center Road, this being his residence during the remainder of his life. He died in 1899, his wife having passed away five years before. John Meidam was the eldest of his parents' nine children, and he received his education in the schools of Grand Chute township. Until he was twenty-one years of age he assisted his father in the work of the home farm, and then for one year worked as a farm hand, at the end of that time learning the carpenter trade, at which he has worked ever since. He has a large contracting business, and resides in a comfortable residence, situated on a two-acre lot located on Rural Route No. 4, in Grand Chute township. Mr. Meidam is a democrat in politics, and for ten years has served as clerk of the school board. He is an attendant of St. Paul's Lutheran Church at Appleton.

On March 8, 1878, Mr. Meidam was married to Hannah Miller, born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, May 1, 1857, daughter of George and Magdalena (Eiher) Miller, natives of Germany and early settlers of Milwaukee, where Mr. Miller was a shoemaker. Later he was engaged in farming in Milwaukee and Outagamie counties, and he died in Grand Chute township in 1900, his wife having passed away three years before.

THOMAS SPRY, who is now living retired at Seymour, Wisconsin, is a Canadian by birth, and is of English parentage, his father having been born in Lincolnshire and his mother in County Norfolk, England. The parents came to America as young people, and were married in Canada, where Mr. Spry carried on agricultural pursuits until his death in 1879 or 1880, in his seventy-second year, while Mrs. Spry survived until June, 1896, she being seventy-five years old at the time of her demise. They had the following children: Tamson, Sarah, Thomas, Victoria, William J., Laura and Emily.

Thomas Spry was born at County Hastings, Ontario, Dominion of Canada, October 10, 1843, and after securing a good common school education in the schools of his native place started out on his own account at the age of twenty-two years. After leaving Canada, he located in the State of Michigan, but after a short period removed to Seymour, Wisconsin, and in 1870 settled on a tract of ninety-six acres of wild land in section 9, in Osborn township. He erected a log cabin, with a roof of split logs, in which he resided until 1876, and during that year went to California, but shortly thereafter returned to Osborn township and again took up farming. During the year 1886, Mr. Spry went to Canada, where he was married to Ann Eastman, a native of England, and a daughter of Alfred Eastman, who came from England and engaged in agricultural pursuits in Canada. Mrs. Spry, who died in 1896, at the age of sixty-two years, had these brothers and sisters: Sarah, Thomas, Edgar, Alfred, Helen, Eliza, Sophia and Laura.

After his marriage Mr. Spry returned to Wisconsin and sold his farm on section 9, purchasing another property on section 3, and on this land he resided until his retirement from active pursuits in 1891, since which time he has resided in the city of Seymour. He is a republican in his political views, but is apt to vote rather for the man than the party. Fraternally, he is connected with the Seymour Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. His religious connection is with the Methodist Church.

APPLETON MACHINE COMPANY. The rapid growth of some of Wisconsin's business enterprises, which have had humble beginnings and have become large industries giving employment to a number of skilled men, has been due to the progressive ideas, enterprise and inherent ability of their incorporators, men who were bound to succeed in whatever line they cast their energies. No better example of this can be found than the Appleton Machine Company, the proprietors of which, H. G. and F. E. Saecker, are well-known business men of Appleton. In 1867, John G. Morgan came from New York to Appleton, and the firm of Ketchum & Morgan was established, Mr. Ketchum's interest being later sold to Henry F. Bassett, of Massachusetts, at which time the firm took the name of Morgan & Bassett. This style continued until 1887, when W. F., F. E. and H. G. Saecker and L. Olmstead purchased the interests of Mr. Bassett, the Appleton Machine Company being established, principally for the purpose of repairing and jobbing, with seven men on the company's pay roll. Business grew to such an extent, however, that it was necessary to increase the capacity of the concern, and the manufacture of papermaking machinery was begun, and the output of the factory is now $125,000 per annum, mostly in contract and special work, necessitating the employment of sixty men. The goods from this concern are shipped all over the United States, and it has gained an enviable reputation not only for the excellence of the work done but for the promptness with which it is delivered and the strict manner in which contracts are lived up to.

The Saecker brothers are sons of Gotfried and Hannah Saecker, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1868. Besides the brothers mentioned the children were: Albert, who is the proprietor of a shop at Marcus, Wisconsin; Julius, who died in 1894; August, who died April 22, 1911; Mrs. Byer, who resides in Appleton; William F., an undertaker and furniture dealer of Appleton. F. E. Saecker was born in Germany, September 1, 1854, and when he had reached the age of seventeen years had thoroughly learned the blacksmith trade in his father's shop. Until coming to Appleton in 1874 he was engaged at his trade in various carriagemaking shops in Wisconsin, and during the following eight years he was employed by the Appleton Manufacturing Company. In 1882, with his brothers and Lamar Olmstead, he organized the Appleton Machine Company, and in 1887 the Bassett & Morgan factory was purchased, Mr. Morgan, however, remaining as a member of the firm. Mr. Olmstead's interest was purchased in 1894. On December 19, 1878, Mr. Saecker married Minnie Breitrick, daughter of Carl Breitrick, and three children were born to this union, only one of whom, Edna Estella, survives. Mr. and Mrs. Saecker are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Temple of Honor, and in politics he is a staunch Republican. Mr. Saecker holds the position of president of the machine company.

H. G. Saecker was born November 16, 1858, in Germany, and at the age of sixteen years left home to work in a farming machine factory for three years, after which he spent two years in the same line at Oak Grove, Dodge county, and three years at blacksmithing in Markesan, Green Lake, county. He then returned to Appleton, where with his brothers and Mr. Olmstead, he established the Appleton Machine Company. He is secretary and treasurer of the concern. In 1891 he was married to Miss Margaret Engler, daughter of Christian Engler, an old settler, and one child was born to this union: Enid Margaret. Mr. and Mrs. Saecker are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

GEORGE MILLER, one of the old and honored residents of Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, who is now living practically retired from activities, after a long and useful life spent in agricultural pursuits, was born in Syracuse, New York, April 1, 1840, and is a son of George and Magdalena (Ehier) Miller, natives of Alsace-Lorraine, Germany. The father of Mr. Miller came to the United States when nineteen years of age, and first located in New York City, where he followed the trade of shoemaker for about twelve years, after which he came to Milwaukee, and later removed to a farm in Granville township. In the fall of 1863 he settled on the farm now owned by his son George, in Grand Chute township, on which he was engaged in farming until his death. He had a family of eight children, as follows: Fred W., a retired citizen of Grand Chute township; George; Sarah, the wife of James Maralott, residing near Oconto, a farmer; Magdalena, the wife of John Hint, a retired farmer of Buffalo county; Eliza, who resides with her sister; Hannah, wife of John Meidham, a carpenter contractor of Grand Chute township; Henry, who is deceased; and Emily, the wife of George Mosier, a resident of Hart, Michigan.

George Miller attended the German schools in Milwaukee and the district schools of Grand Chute township and worked with his father until his enlistment in 1862, in Company K, Thirty-fourth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with which he served with such gallantry and faithfulness that after two months he had advanced to the rank of corporal. He was mustered out of the service at Camp Douglas, and returned to his home in Milwaukee, from whence he accompanied the family to Grand Chute township, and worked for his father until his marriage. At this time his father presented him with forty acres of unimproved land, on which he at once settled, and here was engaged in cultivating the soil until 1909, during which year he bought the old homestead. He reserved two acres for gardening for home use, and also owns twenty acres adjoining his place and forty acres in Center township. He has watched the country grow from a practically unimproved waste to a prosperous industrial and educational center, and has done his full share in bringing the present favorable condition about. Mr. Miller is a member of St. Paul's Lutheran Church, and is a Democrat in politics.

On February 17, 1870, Mr. Miller was married to Miss Helen Meidham, who was born in Appleton, May 9, 1852, daughter of William and Louisa (Van Henklom) Meidham, natives of Amsterdam, Holland, and early settlers of Milwaukee, who later removed to Center township and there spent the rest of their lives. Mr. and Mrs. Miller have three children: Louisa, born May 23, 1871, married Fletcher Tyrrell, a mechanic of Menasha; Paulina, born September 19, 1873, wife of Edward Steinacher, a farmer on the old homestead; and George W., born February 8, 1881, an employe of the city of Appleton, married Emma Steinacher, who is now deceased.

JOHN MCKEEVER, a justice of the peace of Ellington township for the past twenty years, is one of the leading agriculturists of this section and has also been extensively engaged in breeding blooded live stock. He is a son of John McKeever, a native of County Louth, Ireland, who came to the United States in 1850, working the first five years as a farm hand in New York State and then coming west to Green Bay, Wisconsin, from whence he walked through the woods to Ellington township, there buying the farm that became the homestead, and which is now the home of his son Michael. He was married in May, 1857, in Fond du Lac, to Mary Boyle, a native of Limerick, Ireland, who walked from Fond du Lac to her new home with her husband the day after their marriage. She died in 1907. John McKeever was born February 11, 1858, in the log cabin on the old homestead, and secured what education was obtainable in the log schoolhouse of his district. At the age of twenty years he started out to make his own way in the world, going to the pineries, where he remained about five months of the first winter. In the summer Mr. McKeever returned to Ellington township and worked for the farmers by the month and during the winter again went to the woods. The next summer he returned to his father's farm, on which he spent the next five or six years, his winters being occupied as before, but in 1884 he settled down to an agricultural life, his father having presented him with the fine tract which he is now operating. Here he has made many improvements, including a new residence and a large barn, aind he has brought the land into a high state of cultivation. Aside from his farming operations, Mr. McKeever is the owner and trainer of race horses, having Wilkes Blood and Count Buckner, the latter having a mark of 2:06 3/4. He also has a fine herd of Jersey cattle, among which is Gay Lad, one of the finest bulls in the state. He is recognized as an expert judge of live stock, is known as a good, practical farmer, and his ability as an official is testified to by the fact that he has served as justice of the peace of Ellington township for many years. He and his wife are members of St. Patrick's Catholic Church at Stephensville.

Mr. McKeever was married October 30, 1904, to Miss Anne Murphy, who was born December 22, 1871, in Oconto, Oconto county, Wisconsin, daughter of John and Catherine (Regan) Murphy, natives of Canada and farming people of Oconto county, where they still reside. Mr. and Mrs. Murphy had five daughters: Mary Ellen, Anna Bella, Rosa, Jennie and Katherine. To Mr. and Mrs. McKeever seven children have been born: John, James, Ellen, Anne, Lauretta, Margaretta and Sarah.

WILLIAM GOSSE. The farming interests of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, are in the hands of men of experience, progressive methods and practical ideas, with whom it is a matter of pride to keep their section in the front rank of agricultural counties. During the past several decades conditions here have changed to a great extent, and the use of farming machinery as operated by steam power, has greatly facilitated the raising of large crops as compared with the crude implements of the sturdy pioneers who first broke the country to the plow. Practical ideas, good management and the use of up-to-date machinery have made many men successful as agriculturists during the past few years, and one of these is William Gosse, who is the owner of the fine Gosse homestead in Ellington township. Mr. Gosse was born on the farm he is now conducting, December 4, 1879, and is a son of Frank and Johanna Gosse, the former of whom was born in Berlin, Germany, and came to the United States when a young man. He first settled in Greenville township, Outagamie county, but later sold his property there and came to Ellington township, where he followed farming until his death. His widow, who survives him, makes her home with her son on the homestead, which the latter acquired through purchase in the spring of 1911. The family has always been connected with the German Lutheran Church, and Mrs. Gosse is prominent in church and charitable work. The farm is finely developed, well equipped with buildings, has a fine stream of flowing water and yields large crops.

ALBERT A. WETTENGEL, secretary of the Schlafer Hardware Company of Appleton, Wisconsin, is one of the progressive and enterprising business men of this city. He was born in Appleton, December 27, 1872, a son of Frederick William and Henrietta (Sengstock) Wettengel. Frederick W. Wettengel was born August 15, 1836, and died in April, 1882. He was educated in his native city in Bavaria, Germany, serving his apprenticeship as a cabinetmaker. He came to America in 1859, going directly to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. At the first call for volunteer troops at the start of the Civil War, Mr. Wettengel enlisted as a three-months' man, and after his service had been completed came to Appleton. He was married April 24, 1861, to Sophia Getschow, a native of Milwaukee, by whom he had three children, as follows: Lena, who married Charles Hehne, of Appleton; Elizabeth, who married F. W. Findenkeller, of Kaukauna; and Julia, who married August F. Kroenke, of Appleton. Mr. Wettengel's second marriage was to Henrietta Sengstock, in 1869, she having come to this country from Germany in 1868, preceding her parents, John F. and Anna (Moroch) Sengstock. To the second marriage there were born the following children: Carl, a machinist, died in Milwaukee in January, 1896; Albert A., of Appleton; Anna, at home; Fred F.; and George R., who is with his brother Fred in the insurance business in Appleton, was married to Eugenia A. Knuppel. After the death of her first husband Mrs. Wettengel was married March 18, 1883, to George Kirchner, who died in 1896, three children having been born: Flora and Edith, at home; and Louis G., a traveling salesman of Appleton.

Albert A. Wettengel received a public and high school education, graduating from the Ryan High school in 1889. He taught for two terms in the country school, and on April 23, 1891, accepted the position of bookkeeper with the hardware firm of Schlafer, Barrett & Tesh. Upon the organization of the Schlafer Hardware Company, January 12, 1905, he was made secretary, which position he has since held. Mr. Wettengel is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the Sons of Veterans, is a Republican in politics, and a member and trustee of the Congregational Church.

HENRY KREUTZBERG, who is successfully operating a general and dairy farm in Ellington township, has been a lifelong resident of this district, and was born on his father's farm, a son of Conrad and Anna (Baker) Kreutzberg. Conrad Kreutzberg was born in Germany and came to the United States when he was eighteen or nineteen years of age, locating in Greenville township and working for the farmers there by the month for two years. He then came to Ellington township and purchased land, but after three or four years he sold that property and purchased the one now owned by Henry Kreutzberg. At that time there had been made but few improvements on this place, but Conrad Kreutzberg remodeled the house and erected large new barns, also bringing his land to a high state of cultivation. In 1861 he married Barbara Fischer, and. she died in 1876, having been the mother of three children. In 1878 Mr. Kreutzberg married Anna Baker, daughter of Peter Baker, and they had two children, and now reside in Appleton, retired. Henry Kreutzberg's brother, Theodore, died at the age of fourteen years. Henry Kreutzberg received his education in the district schools of Greenville township and the Catholic schools, and was reared to the life of an agriculturist, always remaining on his father's farm, which he purchased in 1905, after having rented it for two years. He carries on farming along general lines, and has made a decided success of his ventures. In 1900 Mr. Kreutzberg was married to Katherine Bauer, who was born in 1878, daughter of Andrew and Katherine Bauer, natives of Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, and to this union there have been born six children: Mary, Asalla, Conrad, Monica, Theodore and Clarence. The family is connected with the Catholic Church at Greenville. In politics Mr. Kreutzberg is identified with the Democratic party, but claims the right to vote independently and to use his own judgment in casting his vote.

FRED PETERSEN, a well-known business man of Appleton, and senior member of the large meat manufacturing firm of Petersen & Rehbein, one of the leading firms of its kind in the city, was born in the town of Clayton, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, March 25, 1860, a son of Fred and Mary (Zeh) Petersen, the former being a native of Glueckenstedt, Germany, and the latter of the Prussian Province of Saxony. Fred Petersen, the elder, came to the United States in 1854, and located in Milwaukee. He was a carpenter and cabinetmaker and in this country was chiefly engaged in contracting and building. Some of the buildings erected by Mr. Petersen are still standing as monuments to his skill and thoroughness as a workman, and one that was built in 1857, is now, after a period of more than half a century, in an excellent state of preservation and in daily use. Mr. Petersen died January 6, 1908, leaving a widow and eight children, all living, the children's names being as follows: Fred; Henry, a resident of Minneapolis, Minnesota; Anna, living at home; William, a civil engineer of Chicago, Illinois; Mary, residing at Long Beach, California; Minnie and Pauline, both engaged in teaching at Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and Alvina, the wife of Fred Zabler, of Coachella, California. Fred Petersen, the immediate subject of this sketch, was educated in the common schools and at Lawrence Col lege. Before attaining his majority he bought and sold stock in this section, and when twenty-one years old he took over the business formerly conducted by his father. He now owns a stock farm of 120 acres near Appleton, where he raises thoroughbred Holstein cattle. He has served as alderman and as a member of the General Assembly two terms, is a member of the Elks, the Modern Woodmen and the E. F. U. He has always stood for that type of citizenship which places the city's interest before his own, and any movement which has for its object the betterment of educational, social or commercial conditions, finds in him an earnest and enthusiastic supporter. In 1883, Mr. Petersen married Josephine, daughter of Henry and Frederica Mathieu, who died in 1889, leaving one son, Fred. In 1891, Mr. Petersen married his first wife's sister, Edith, and they are the parents of one daughter, Esther, who is living at home. Mr. and Mrs. Petersen are members of the First Congregational Church.

AUGUST GRESENZ, whose birth occurred January 3, 1857, in Hinterpomer, Germany, is a son of Martin and Caroline (Kranzusch) Gresenz, natives of the Fatherland. Martin Gresenz came to the United States in 1869 with his family and settled in Black Creek township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, on a farm of sixty acres, of which ten were cleared, and soon replaced the log cabin and barn with a good frame house and substantial barn. He started to cultivate his property, and later added two tracts of eighty acres each to it, and at the time of his death, in 1910, at the age of eighty-eight years, he was one of the substantial agriculturists of his township. His wife died in 1894, when sixty-six years of age. Mr. Gresenz had two brothers, John, residing in Germany, and William, who died in Chicago, and one sister, Mary, who married August Schafelk. Mrs. Gresenz's two brothers, August and Francis, died in Germanv, while her sister, Lucy, married Fred Winzlof and died in Black Creek. To the parents of August Gresenz there were born the following children: Bertha, Minnie, Charles, August, Gustave, William, Anna and Lena, all of whom are now living.

The early education of August Gresenz was secured in Germany, and he attended school in Wisconsin only a short time. He remained on the home property until reaching the age of twenty-five years, when he engaged in farming in Black Creek township, where he purchased a tract of eighty acres, but after three years on this land sold out and became an employe of the circulation department of the German newspaper conducted by W. H. Myer & Company of Appleton. During the following twenty-five years he traveled extensively in this connection, and at the end of this time located in Seymour, where he has since been engaged in the monument business.

In 1881 Mr. Gresenz was married to Mrs. Mary Zigezenben, a native of Washington county, Wisconsin, and the daughter of an old settler of Black Creek township, and to this union there have been born the following children: Anna, who married Henry Holz, of Racine, Wisconsin; Lena, who died at the age of fifteen years; Minnie, who died when two years old; and Elsie, who lives at home with her parents.

FREDERICK WILLIAM MILLER. One of Grand Chute township's old and honored residents, who has watched the country grow and develop during nearly half of a century, was for a long period engaged in agricultural pursuits, and now lives retired,---Frederick William Miller. Mr. Miller was born June 13, 1838, in Wayne county, New York, and is a son of George and Magdalena (Aeers) Miller, both born near Strausberg. George Miller came to America before he had attained his majority and for about twelve years was engaged in shoemaking in Wayne county, New York, where he was married, and then came west to Milwaukee, later settling on a farm in Granville township. In the fall of 1863 he settled on the farm now owned by his son George in Grand Chute township, where he carried on agricultural pursuits up to the time of his death. His eight children were as follows: Frederick William; George, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Sarah, who married James Maralott, a farmer near Oconto, Wisconsin; Magdalena, who married John Hint, a retired farmer of Buffalo county, Wisconsin; Eliza, who resides with her sister; Hannah, who married John Meidham, of Grand Chute township, a contracting carpenter; Henry, deceased; and Emily, the wife of George Mosier, a resident of Hart, Michigan. George Miller attended the district schools of Granville township, and resided at home until he was twenty-one years of age, when he began to work for others, principally at barrel stave making, often making as many as 1,000 in a day. He continued this for about five years, and then spent two years in a mill at Warsaw. In the fall of 1864 he came to Appleton and bought forty acres of land, on which he was engaged in farming until 1893, in which year he sold out and came to his present fifty-nine acre farm in Grand Chute township, which is now being operated by his sons, Mr. Miller's activities being limited to light gardening work. He is a Democrat in politics, and has served as chairman of the township nine years, township treasurer five years and in other township offices in the gift of the people. He holds membership in the Lutheran Church.

On January 1, 1859, Mr. Miller was married to Magdalena, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Healt) Moser. She was born September 5, 1841, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, whence her parents came in 1838 from Bavaria. Mr. Moser was engaged in farming in Milwaukee county up to the time of his death in 1846, and his widow married again and continued to live on the homestead until her death in 1901. Mrs. Miller died May 23, 1910, having been the mother of fourteen children, of whom ten grew to maturity, as follows: Magdalena, who is deceased; John, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Ellen, the wife of Charles Nichols, a real estate dealer of Appleton; Lovina, the wife of Fred Lindauer, a papermaker of Little Rapids, Wisconsin; William, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Clara, the wife of Robert McCoy, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Ida, who married Gust DeTier, of Miamisburg, Ohio, a mechanic; Zadie, the wife of Frank Casha, a papermaker of Appleton; Rosana, the wife of Will Wilharm, a farmer of Grand Chute township; and Edward, who lives with his father. Mr. Miller has thirty-one grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

DENNIS P. HALLORAN, a leading agriculturist of Ellington township, who is the owner of fine farming property, was born on his present farm, July 10, 1868, and is a son of Michael and Julia (Newcomb) Halloran. Michael Halloran was a native of the Emerald Isle, and as a young man left the County Cork for the United States, locating in Ellington township in 1865. He purchased the land now owned by his son, Dennis, which he cleared from its wild state and here he continued to follow agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1891. His wife, who was a native of County Louth, Ireland, came to this country when she was fourteen years of age, and until her marriage was a resident of New York City. She also passed away in 1891. Dennis P. Halloran was one of a family of six children, and received his education in the district schools of Ellington township, being reared to the life of a farmer. He has always worked on the home farm, which he inherited at the death of his father. He has made a number of improvements on the place, remodeling the residence and erecting new buildings, and he now has one of the valuable tracts of his section. In 1896, Mr. Halloran was married to Elizabeth Laird, who was born in Ellington township, October 23, 1869, a daughter of Edward and Fanny (Hull) Laird. Two children have been born to this union: Julia, born September 14, 1901; and Gertrude, born June 20, 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Halloran are consistent members of the Catholic Church at Stephensville. Mr. Halloran is progressive in his views, and has always been an active supporter of movements that have for their object the betterment of his township or county.

FRANK S. MURPHY, cashier of the Riverside Fiber and Paper Company, one of the leading firms of paper manufacturers of Northern Wisconsin, is a popular resident of Appleton, where he has spent his entire life. Mr. Murphy was born September 2, 1885, in Appleton, and his education was secured in the public and high schools. He began his business career with the firm with which he is now connected, joining their forces in January, 1905, as an office clerk, and being gradually advanced until he reached his present position. He is one of the firm's most trusted employes, and has gained his present position through the force of his own industry and merit. Mr. Murphy is a popular member of the Masons and the Elks. In 1910, he was united in marriage with Miss Mabel Dean, of Appleton.

JOHN C. BOLDT, who is now the owner of a well-cultivated farm of sixty-two acres, located in Grand Chute township, is one of Outagamie county's self-made men, having started in life in humble circumstances and won success through hard, persevering labor. He was born at Menasha, Wisconsin, January 6, 1864, and is a son of Christian and Christina (Weaver) Boldt, the former born in Mecklenberg, Germany, in March, 1801, and the latter in Frankfort, Germany, February 18, 1827. John C. Boldt was married first in Germany, and on coming to this country located in Milwaukee for one year, after which he came to Greenville township, Outagamie county, to live with the daughter born to his first marriage, Sophia, who had married Henry Everett, and is now a widow of Clayton township. Later he was married to Christina Weaver, who bore him one child, John C. After his second marriage, Mr. Boldt located in Grand Chute township, where he continued to reside up to the time of his death; about 1890, with the exception of a short time spent in Menasha. His widow passed away in 1904. John C. Boldt attended district school No. 4 in Grand Chute township until he had reached the age of thirteen years, at which time he was compelled to give up his studies in order to go to work to help support his parents. For three years he worked among the farmers of the neighborhood, and at the end of this time had saved fifty dollars, which he paid down as first payment on a farm of ten acres, which is a part of his present property. He started to cultivate this farm when he could spare time from working for others, and during seventeen winters was employed at cutting cordwood, and soon added thirty-six acres to his original purchase. In the meantime he had married, and when his children had grown large enough to take care of the duties on the home farm he began working at the mason's trade during the summer months, and this he has continued to the present time. Mr. Boldt's farm now contains sixty-two acres of land, all finely cultivated, well fenced and equipped with modern, substantial buildings, and he successfully carries on a general line of farming and stock raising. Mr. Boldt's success in life has been entirely due to his own efforts, and he now stands as a notable example of what may be accomplished by a man who has natural ability and a determination to succeed.

On June 11, 1886, Mr. Boldt was married to Sophia Schumaker, who was born in Mecklenberg, Germany, November 19, 1867, daughter of John and Louisa (Shrauder) Schumaker, natives of that place, where the father was born May 5, 1833, and the mother in April, 1836. They came to America about 1882 and located in Grand Chute township where Mr. Schumaker carried on farming until his retirement, and he now lives in Appleton. Mrs. Schumaker died in 1907, having been the mother of six children, as follows: Louisa, who married Charles Hearling, of Center township; Charles, a resident of Center township; John, living in Ellington township; Dora, who is deceased; Sophia, who married Mr. Boldt; and Lena, who married Joseph Horner, a butcher of Appleton. Mr. and Mrs. Boldt have had eight children, namely: Edward, Ida, Rudolph, Daniel, Florence and Pearl, and two who died in infancy. The family is connected with the Evangelical Church at Appleton. In political matters Mr. Boldt is an independent Republican, and he has never aspired to public office.

DANIEL L. SCHULZE, who ranks among the prosperous agriculturists of Greenville township, Outagamie county, was born January 8, 1853, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a son of Daniel and Henrietta Schulze, old settlers and large land holders of Greenville township. Daniel Schulze was born in Brandenburg, Germany, December 25, 1805, and his wife in Saxony, May 13, 1816, and they came to America in 1846, locating in Milwaukee for about seven years, and then coming to Outagamie county and settling on a farm in Greenville township, a wild tract on section 3, where the only building was a rude log shack in which the family lived. Mr. Schulze was of a very industrious nature, however, and after spending some time at wood chopping, for which he received two shillings per day, he settled down to clear up his land, and soon had a comfortable home for himself and family. He added to his land holdings from time to time, and at one period was the owner of 460 acres of some of the best land in Greenville township, and here he died October 16, 1880. His first wife had died, leaving him two children, and by his second wife, a widow, Mrs. Henrietta Schmidt, he had four children, namely: August, who is deceased; Daniel L.; Robert, a farmer of Greenville township; and Frank, who is a retired resident of Appleton. Daniel L. Schulze attended school in Greenville township, and at the age of twenty-three years bought a farm from his father in Ellington township, where he resided about eighteen years. He then sold out and purchased the farm which he now owns, an excellent tract of 120 acres, on which he carries on general farming and also raises some stock for his own use. He is known as a hard-working, thrifty and practical agriculturist, and as a public-spirited and representative citizen. He is a Republican in his political affiliations, but has never aspired to office. On. February 18, 1878, Mr. Schulze was married to Louisa Becker, who was born in Greenville township, Outagamie county, April 28, 1856, daughter of Frederick and Mary (Nieman) Becker, natives of Germany. Frederick Becker was born in Mecklenberg, March 27, 1816, and in 1854 came to the United States, locating at once in Outagamie county, where he operated a farm until his death, February 17, 1893, his wife having passed away in 1858. They were the parents of nine children, of whom four are still living: Frederick, a retired farmer of Appleton; Henry, who is engaged in farming in Greenville township; Louis, who is retired and lives in Appleton; and Mrs. Schulze. Mr. and Mrs. Schulze have had eleven children, as follows: Frederick, born December 28, 1876, residing near Antigo, a farmer; Emil, born September 25, 1878, a carpenter, residing at home; Elsa, born May 25, 1880, wife of Charles Eggert, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Julia, born July 12, 1883, and Alvin, born May 24, 1886, single and residing at home; Bernhart, born March 23, 1888, who died August 3, 1895; and John, born April 16, 1890; Louisa, born May 20, 1891; Caroline, born August 9, 1893; Edward, born August 21, 1896, and Daniel, born October 6, 1898, all single and residing at home.

THOMAS KELLY, a progressive agriculturist and public-spirited citizen of Ellington township, deserves more than passing mention for the part he has taken in the advancement of his community, not only as a developer of land, but as the originator of movements that have proved of inestimable value to his township. He is a son of Richard Kelly, a native of County Louth, Ireland, who came to this country as a young man, shortly after his marriage, and settled in Orange county, New York, where he worked for ten or twelve years. He came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, in 1856, and bought land in Ellington township when this section was covered with heavy timber, building a log cabin in which the family lived for several years. The remainder of his life was spent on this farm, and his death occurred here in 1903. He was married in Ireland to Ann Newcomb, who died in 1891, and they had a family of ten children. Thomas Kelly was born February 17, 1850, in Orange county, New York, and he received his education in the schools of his neighborhood, although, to use his own words, he was "often detained at home to chop wood, and has been chopping ever since." He continued to remain with his parents until the spring of 1879, at which time he moved to his present home, which had been purchased by his father some time before. In the fall of that year Mr. Kelly was married to Mary A. Gartlin, born in Orange county, New York, daughter of Patrick and Katherine (Farl) Gartlin, natives of Ireland, and to this union there were born five children: Frank, who died at the age of twenty-three years; and Thomas L., George, Mary and Catherine. Mr. and Mrs. Kelly are members of the Catholic church at Stephensville. Mr. Kelly was clerk of the township for eighteen years and supervisor four years, and was then elected township chairman, and while acting in this capacity he advocated the building of stone bridges in Ellington township, backing up his idea with such force as to practically compel the township officials to have this work done. In recognition of his excellent services in this capacity, he was nominated for the Legislature on the Democratic ticket of 1910, but owing to political conditions in this section at that time he met with defeat. His farming duties have demanded the greater part of his attention, but he has also found time to act as agent for the Farmers' Home Mutual Insurance Company, an organization made up of farmers of Ellington and the surrounding townships.

WILLIAM PETERS, who is now engaged in cultivating a fine farm in Greenville township, also devotes a part of his time to the mason's trade, at which he worked steadily in this section for a number of years. He was born January 20, 1863, in Niagara county, New York, a son of Fred and Fredericka (Schroeder) Peters, natives of Mecklenburg, where the former was born May 7, 1830, and the latter June 3, 1837. Fred Peters spent three years in the German army, and after his marriage came to the United States in 1860, locating near Buffalo, New York. In his native country, Mr. Peters had been a shepherd, and his small savings had been completely used up in making the trip to the new country, his cash possessions on landing here amounting to fifty cents. However, he was willing to work at anything that offered itself, and soon had accumulated enough to bring the family to Milwaukee, in which city they settled in 1865, on the day of the assassination of President Lincoln. They went thence after a short period to Appleton, where Mr. Peters purchased a farm of forty acres in Center township, and the remainder of his life was spent in farming, his holdings at the time of his death, in 1897, being 140 acres of excellent farming land. Mrs. Peters survived her husband until 1909, when she passed away. William Peters was the eldest of a family of nine children, and he attended school in Center township, residing at home until seventeen years of age, at which time he went to Kaukauna and learned the trade of mason, following that occupation in the winter until he was twenty-three years old, and working on farms in the summer months. He then began working steadily at his trade, and for eight years was working on government construction work, on the locks at Kaukauna, the county asylum, the Combined Locks paper mill, Patten's paper mill at Kaukauna, and two years' straight work on a job at Manitowoc. After fourteen years' residence in Kaukauna, he came to his farm in Greenville township, where he has been engaged to the present time, although he occasionally does work at his trade. His eighty acres are well cultivated, and he uses modern machinery in his operations, being engaged in general and dairy farming and also in raising good stock. Mr. Peters is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in his political belief is an independent republican. On December 27, 1885, Mr. Peters was married to Henrietta Longlatz, who was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, August 20, 1863, daughter of George and Erbetena (Pry) Longlatz, the former born in Saxony, Germany, June 27, 1830, and died October 27, 1909, and the latter born in Pomerania, Germany, and still resides in Center township. George Longlatz, who was a, farmer throughout his active career, came to the United States at a very early day, and after a short residence in New Jersey came West to Milwaukee, six years later locating in Outagamie county and purchasing a farm of eighty acres in Center township, where he became a prominent farmer and well-known citizen, serving in various township offices. Mrs. Peters was the second of her parents' four children. Mr. and Mrs. Peters have had thirteen children: George, who is engaged in farming in South Dakota; Elizabeth, Arnold, Walter, Irvin and Florence, residing at home; and seven children who died young.

WILLIAM SCHROEDER, a successful and industrious farmer of Ellington township, owning one of the fine properties on Greenville Rural Route No. 16, a tract of 183 1-3 acres, was born October 18, 1871, in Germany, a son of John F. and Minnie (Voss) Schroeder. John F. Schroeder was born in Germany in 1840, and was there married to Minnie Voss, who was born in the Fatherland in 1851. They came to the United States in 1874, settling in Center township, where Mr. Schroeder bought a farm and they resided for eighteen years, then moving to the farm now occupied by their son, William. They continued on the latter until Mr. Schroeder's retirement from active pursuits, since which time they have been living in the city of Appleton. The Center township land was developed from the wilderness, there having been no improvements on the property when the family first located there, but with the assistance of his sons Mr. Schroeder made it into an excellent, fertile farm. The five children of John F. and Minnie Schroeder were as follows: Tilda, who married George Longlatz and died in 1895, leaving a son, Arnold; Emma, who died at the age of twenty-one years; and William, Freda and August. William Schroeder was three years of age when the family came to the United States, and he received his education in the district schools of Center township, being reared on his father's farm, which he helped to clear. At the age of thirty years Mr. Schroeder started out on his own account, first renting his present farm, and later operating land across the road in Greenville township, which he had bought previously. After two years he purchased his father's farm, and he now devotes 183 1-3 acres to general farming and dairy work, also raising well-bred cattle. On October 21, 1896, Mr. Schroeder was married to Mary Moss, daughter of John and Minnie Moss, of Osborn township, who originally came from the Fatherland. Five children have been born to this union: Harry, Victor, Loretta, Carl and Viola. Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder are members of the German Lutheran Church of Ellington. He is a member of the Path Finders. In all movements that are calculated to be of benefit to his community Mr. Schroeder has taken a prominent part, and as a farmer and citizen is held in high esteem by his fellow townsmen.

JOHN GILLESPIE, a well-known citizen of Grand Chute township who is engaged in cattle raising, is a native of Ireland, having been born in County Antrim, February 22, 1868, a son of Alexander and Jane (Warwick) Gillespie, farming people of the Emerald Isle who never came to the United States. Both are now deceased. Mr. Gillespie was the next to the youngest of his parents' eight children, and he attended school in Ireland until he was about twelve years of age, although one year before this he had engaged in working for his board. He had just passed his thirteenth birthday when he came to America with his brothers and sisters, and he went to school for two years in Ellington, to Dr. Kenovan. After he had completed his educational training he went to work for James Laird, an uncle, as a farm hand, continuing with him six months and then becoming a milk wagon driver, which he continued to follow for about seven years for various dairymen of the vicinity of Appleton. He next secured the position of bus driver for the Sherman House, working for Mr. Wright until he was married, at which time he located on his present farm, which he had purchased two years before. He has forty-two acres of land, operated in a general way, although during the last few years he has given up his dairy and Holstein cattle business, on account of being incapacitated by rheumatism, and is now engaged in feeding cattle for the market. He is giving all of his time and attention to the farm, and has never found time to actively engage in politics, although he has served as school clerk, to which office he was elected as an independent candidate. In national matters he votes with the republican party. Mr. Gillespie is not a member of any religious denomination, although he was reared in the Presbyterian faith.

On April 25, 1894, Mr. Gillespie was united in marriage with Miss Lulu Ethel Taylor, who was born in Grand Chute township, January 13, 1870, daughter of Benjamin and Mary (Bowe) Taylor, natives of England, where they were married about 1856. They came to America three months after marriage, and located at Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, where Mr. Taylor engaged in farming, although he was a mason by trade and had followed that occupation in England. One year later the family came to Appleton, and located on a property which is still known as the old Taylor homestead, and here they spent the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of nine children, and Mrs. Gillespie was the next to the youngest. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Gillespie, namely: Mary Christasel, born September 10, 1895; Leland Andrew, born December 2, 1899; Stanley Alexander, born July 17, 1903; and Helen Ethel, born June 13, 1906.

JOHN STUCKART, one of the substantial citizens of Seymour, Wisconsin, who is proprietor of the Seymour Bottling Works, is a native of Germany, born in Prussia, January 24, 1863, a son of Nicholas and Maggie (Wachter) Stuckart, natives of the Fatherland. Nicholas Stuckart followed the trade of mason throughout his life, and his death occurred in Germany in 1903, when he had reached the age of sixty-eight years. His widow, who still survives, is now seventy-three years of age. Nicholas and Maggie Stuckart had the following children: Anna, John, Regina, Nicholas, Laura, and Christoph.

John Stuckart, who was the only one of the family to come to the United States, secured his early education in Germany, and in 1880, when but seventeen years of age he left the old country to come to Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Remaining but a few days, he went out into the country to follow the trade of mason, which he had learned with his father, and he made this his chief occupation during the next three years. At this time he was married, and he settled on a farm, on which he resided until 1886, in which year he came to Seymour township and purchased eighty acres of wild land, on which he erected a log house and later, after he had cultivated the property, built a substantial frame dwelling. Selling this property at a good profit, Mr. Stuckart then purchased a tract of 120 acres, of which 100 were cleared, and resided on this property until, 1905, in which year he removed to the city of Seymour, where, in 1908, he purchased the bottling works of G. G. Munger, which have since been known as the Seymour Bottling Works. Mr. Stuckart has demonstrated that a man by perseverance and hard work may succeed in making a place for hiniself among the substantial men of his section, and he is now recognized as one of the representative citizens of Seymour. His politics are those of the Democratic party, and he has served as a member of the board of supervisors.

In 1884, Mr. Stuckart was united in marriage with Agnes Kern, who was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a daughter of Andrew Kern, an old settler of Seymour township who is now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Stuckart have had seven children, namely: Frank, Mary, Theresa, Nicholas, Walberga, Anna and John.

GEORGE H. PACKARD, a well known business citizen of Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in Plover, Portage county, Wisconsin, September 14, 1878, and is a son of Charles T. and Mary J. (Prouty) Packard, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of New York. Charles T. Packard came to Wisconsin about 1856, and here engaged in the lumber business, which occupied his attention during the remainder of his life. He married Mary J. Prouty, who survives him and resides with her son. They had three children: Frank, Edward and George H. The latter received his early education at Plover, Wisconsin, later attending the State Normal school at Stevens Point, Wisconsin, after leaving which institution he became bookkeeper for D. B. Bailey, in whose employ he continued for two and one-half years. In 1899 he commenced to work for a certain party, in the capacity of shipping clerk, and after five months as bookkeeper was sent on the road. During eight years he had charge of the stock buying, and in 1905 was made manager of the concern, being elected to the office of vice-president during 1910. In 1902 Mr. Packard was married to Anna C. Trettien, of Appleton, daughter of Charles Trettien, and they have had three children. Mr. and Mrs. Packard are consistent members of the Congregational Church. He is a progressive Republican in politics, and is now serving as clerk of the Second District school board. His fraternal connections are with the Masonic fraternity, in which he has reached the Knight Templar degree, the Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias. He is well and favorably known in Appleton, and is regarded as one of the substantial business men and representative public-spirited citizens of this city.

NELSON W. WINTERS, one of the old and honored residents of Seymour, Wisconsin, who is now living retired after a long and useful life of business activity, is a veteran of the great Civil War. Mr. Winters was born October 29, 1830, in Canada, and is a son of Henry and Eliza (Perkins) Winters, natives of Vermont, where they were married. Henry Winters went to Canada to devote his attention to lumber interests, but after some years there returned to the United States and located in Ohio, where he engaged in farming for a time and later moved to Washington county, Wisconsin, settling two and one-half miles from Hartford, where his death occurred in his sixty-sixth year, his wife having passed away at the age of fifty-three. Their children were as follows: Susan, Mary Ann, Nelson W., Henry, Clara, Joel, Calvin, Harrison, Corwin and Perry. When the Civil War broke out, this family gave the Union army five good soldiers, the father being a member of a Wisconsin regiment, Joel belonging to the Twelfth Wisconsin Volunteers, Harrison being a member of a Missouri regiment, and Perry and Nelson participating as privates in Wisconsin organizations, Perry dying in the famous Libby Prison.

Nelson W. Winters secured his education in the schools of Ohio and Wisconsin and at the age of nineteen years started out to make his own way in the world. He engaged in farming for one year and then learned the trade of tinner, which he followed for a number of years. At the time of the outbreak of the Civil War he was married and had two children, but this did not deter him from enlisting in his country's service, and he became a member of a regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers, with which he served until he secured his honorable discharge. At this time he returned to Viroqua, Vernon county, Wisconsin, where he had been in business before the war, and resumed his business activities, following the trades of metal worker and tinsmith until his retirement, when he located in Seymour, and here he has since made his home.

Mr. Winters was married (first) to Sarah Lewis, by whom he had two children: Eugene and Cora, who both now reside in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and his second marriage was to Mrs. Maggie Winters, the widow of his brother Joel, who had one child, Perry. On February 7, 1906, Mr. Winters was married a third time, his wife being Mrs. Anna Castona, the widow of Henry Castona, a native of Janesville, Wisconsin, who died at the age of forty-nine years. Mrs. Winters was a daughter of Hans and Catherine Peters, natives of Germany, where Mr. Peters died at the age of thirty-nine years. Mrs. Peters then married John Rothman, and they came to the United States with the children of Mrs. Rothman's first marriage, namely: George, John, Hans and Anna. There was also an infant who died in Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Rothman had three children: Phoebe, who is deceased; Mary, of Menasha, Winnebago county, Wisconsin; and Catherine, who married a Mr. Tage of Cicreo township, Outagamie county. Mrs. Rothman died in 1898 at the age of seventy- five years, and her husband passed away in Outagamie county.

EDWARD L. HASSINGER, the proprietor of a large poultry farm in Greenville township, is a native Wisconsinian, having been born in Newburg, Washington county, July 22, 1863, a son of Adam and Frances (Starch) Hassinger. Adam Hassinger was born in Hessen, Germany, February 8, 1833, and died February 6, 1911, while his wife was born in Austria, July 25, 1837, and still survives. Mr. Hassinger came to the United States when about twenty-two years of age, and came immediately to Milwaukee, where he followed the trade of butcher until coming to Greenville township in 1898, with the exception of one and one-half years spent at Newburg. He spent the remainder of his life in agricultural pursuits on the farm now operated by his son Edward L. Edward L. Hassinger was the oldest of the nine children born to his parents and he attended school in Milwaukee, after leaving which he learned the trade of butcher with his father, and was engaged in that business in Milwaukee until 1893. In that year he rented his father-in-law's farm, on which he remained five years, at the end of that time coming to the farm which he now conducts, a tract of sixty acres, which he devotes largely to poultry raising, making a specialty of Rhode Island Reds and Wyandotte, and marketing his product in Appleton. Mr. Hassinger was married December 26, 1888, to Elizabeth Krueger, who was born in Milwaukee county, Granville township, July 20, 1867, daughter of Albert and Ernestina (---------- ) Krueger, natives of Germany and early settlers of Milwaukee county, having located here when the Indians were still plentiful in this part of the country. Mr. Krueger is deceased, but his widow still survives him. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hassinger, namely: Lillian, born February 25, 1889, wife of Augusta Winter, a fireman of Minneapolis; Edward, born July 25, 1890; Rose, born October 7, 1891; Laura, born September 15, 1893; Harry, born November 8, 1896; and Roland, born July 26, 1897, all living at home. Mr. Hassinger is independent in his political views.

HERMAN CARL KERWAEK, engaged in farming eighty acres of fine land in Grand Chute township, is one of the representative citizens of this section, and was born in Sadlen, near Stolp, Pomerania, Germany, April 28, 1862, a son of Martin and Anna (Kerwaek) Kerwaek, natives of the Fatherland. The father, who was always engaged in farming, died in the old country in 1868, while his widow is still surviving. They had seven children, as follows: William, residing in Seymour township, Outagamie county; Wilhelmina, Augusta, August, Hannie and Albert, who are living in Germany; and Herman Carl. Herman C. Kerwaek attended the public schools of his native place, and at the age of sixteen years started to learn the carpenter trade at Kolp. He worked in the city during the winter months and at home in the summers until he was nineteen years, at which time he came to America and made his way directly to Seymour, where his brother, William, resided. During the summers he worked on his brother's threshing outfit, and in the winter months he chopped wood for the charcoal kilns and hauled logs, but eventually secured work at his trade in Appleton, where he worked for one year. He then was engaged in railroad and factory work until his marriage, at which time he located in Center township, on his wife's old home which he, had purchased, but a short time thereafter moved back to Appleton and engaged in work for his brother-in-law, John Speaker, for about one year. He then spent a year in the employ of the Northwestern Railroad, at the end of which time he bought the farm which he now owns, a tract of eighty acres in Grand Chute township, on which he carries on general farming and raises cattle, horses and hogs. He has made many improvements to his property, and now has one of the neat-appearing and highly productive farms of this section. Mr. Kerwaek is a member of the Lutheran Church and in political matters is a republican.

Mr. Kerwaek was married July 24, 1887, to Louisa Gonka, who was born in Center township, March 30, 1838, daughter of Henry and Louisa (Purat) Gonka, the former born in Mecklenburg and the latter in Hanover, Germany. They were married in Germany and came to the United States at an early date, locating near Hartford, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, where they resided some years. After leaving that section they came to Center township, Outagamie county, locating on a farm, and there they resided until recently, when they removed to Appleton. Later they returned to the old homestead, where Mr. Gonka died in 1881, his widow surviving until February 11, 1907, when she passed away. Mrs. Gonka had been married previously to her union with Mr. Gonka, and by her first marriage had two children: Fred Jense, a retired citizen of Appleton; and William, a veteran of the Civil War, who is now retired and living on a comfortable pension at Waupaca, Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Gonka had five children: Mary, who is deceased; Hannie, who is the wife of John Speaker; Carrie, who married August Speaker, a real estate agent of Abrams; Bertha, the wife of Fred Peslein, a retired railroad man; and Mrs. Kerwaek. Mr. and Mrs. Kerwaek have had three children: Albert, born March 15, 1888, residing at home; Ella, born September 29, 1889, wife of Leonard Siebold, connected with the Graff Manufacturing Company of Appleton; and Martha, born February 21, 1891, who lives at home.

FREDERICK SCHULTZ, who has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in Grand Chute township for nearly a quarter of a century, is now the owner of a finely improved farm of forty acres. He is a native of Germany, being born at Bromberg, December 13, 1849, a son of Frederick and Anna (Malone) Schultz, natives of the Fatherland. Frederick Schultz the father was a limeburner by trade, and spent his life in Germany, where he died at the age of forty-five years, and his widow came to the United States in 1873, but after one year returned to the old country, where her death occurred when she was sixty years old. They were the parents of four children: Mena, who is deceased; Amelia, a widow, residing in the old country; Othelia, who died in Milwaukee, and Frederick. Mr. Schultz received his education in the schools of Germany, and was fourteen years of age when he started to work. His first employment was as a shepherd, and he followed that occupation until he was twenty-two years old, at which time he entered the German army, but after six months received his discharge on account of an injury which he had received during a cyclone some years before. Mr. Schultz came to America in 1873, landing at New York City, from whence he came direct to Milwaukee, there learning the tinner's trade, an occupation which he followed seven years. He then went to Lincoln, Minnesota, near the line of the Dakotas, where he remained about six months, and at this time came to Appleton, being in exceedingly straightened circumstances when he arrived here. He at once began to work at his trade, which he followed for six years, and at the end of this time had accumulated enough money to enable him to make a payment on his present farm, where he has been operating ever since. By persevering labor he has developed one of the good farms of his township, and he is esteemed as a self-made man and good citizen by all who know him. He has thoroughly equipped his farm with good buildings and power machinery, and the entire forty acres are inclosed in fence. Mr. Schultz has given all of his attention to his farm, and has found no time to engage either in other pursuits or in public matters.

On March 23, 1873, Mr. Schultz was married to Gertie Kleseter, who was born in Ganter Gust, Germany, September 20, 1847, daughter of Frederick and Anna (--------------) Kleseter, natives of Germany, where they spent their lives. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Schultz, namely: Gustave, born January 30, 1876, a mason contractor of Appleton; Richard, born November 7, 1877, who died in April, 1878; Anna, born December 27, 1880, who married Frank Kohl, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Herman, born February 8, 1882, a carpenter contractor of Appleton; and Ernst, born February 13, 1886, who is single and resides at home.

DANIEL LEAHY, a prosperous agriculturist and one of the highly esteemed residents of Greenville township, who is engaged in cultivating 160 acres of land, of which he is the owner of eighty acres, was born at Waukesha, Wisconsin, November 1, 1853, and is a son of Daniel and Margaret (Kehoe) Leahy, natives of County Cork, Ireland. The family came to the United States in 1850, and after spending about three months in New York City, moved to Greenfield, Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, where Mr. Leahy worked for other people. He eventually went to Waukesha, Wisconsin, where he purchased a home and continued to work for others, and in 1860 came to Greenville township, and bought the present farm of his son Daniel, where he spent the balance of his life, his death occurring in 1895. His wife passed away about fifteen years before. They were the parents of nine children, namely: Katherine, the widow of Michael Woods; Margaret, the wife of Bernhart Cavenaugh, residing near Appleton Junction; John, who is deceased; Bridget, single, who makes her home with her brother Daniel; William, deceased; Michael, who is also dead; Daniel; and Timothy and Mary, both deceased. Daniel Leahy attended school in Greenville township, and has always resided on the old homestead farm with the exception of seven winters when he went to Northern Wisconsin and worked in the woods, continuing this from the age of twenty years until he was twenty-seven. He spent the summer months, however, in work on the home farm, and during the fall operated a threshing outfit, thus keeping himself continuously occupied. For the past few years, however, he has devoted his entire attention to the farm, his operations having grown to such an extent that he finds little time for other activities. In his political preferences he is a Democrat, but outside of taking an active interest in local affairs, he has not been identified closely with public matters. He attends St. Mary's Roman Catholic church, at Appleton, of which his sister, Bridget, who keeps house for him, is also a faithful member. Mr. Leahy has never married.

ANTON HOIER, who has been a lifelong resident of Ellington township, Outagamie county, and is now engaged in cultivating the soil of a fine general and dairy farm, was born June 17, 1866, in Ellington township, and is a son of Frank Joseph and Catherine Hoier, natives of Germany who came to the United States with their six children, settling at once in Ellington township, where both spent the remainder of their lives, Mr. Hoier passing away in 1887 and his wife in 1905. They had two other children after locating in the United States, of whom one was Anton, and he received his education in the district schools in the neighborhood of his father's farm. As soon as he was able to do his share of the work on the home place, he began to assist his father, spending his spare time in attendance at school and gaining a good, practical education. As a youth and young man he worked for his father, and when the latter's health failed, the management of the home place fell to the lot of young Hoier, who purchased the property in 1903. Since that time he has made numerous improvements, including the erection of a good, comfortable modern residence, in which he lives with his youngest sister, Matilda, who keeps house for him, Mr. Hoier being unmarried. He has carried on general farming and dairy work, and his operations have been so successful as to stamp him as one of the able agriculturists of this section. He is a good neighbor and a public spirited citizen, and has the confidence, esteem and friendship of his fellow townsmen.

JOHN SCHNEIDER, one of the old and honored residents of Appleton, Wisconsin, now living retired, was for a number of years engaged in agricultural pursuits in Grand Chute township, and is now the owner of a valuable farm situated within the city limits of Appleton. He was born in the Province of Rhine, Germany, November 1, 1834, a son of Bernhardt and Mary (Traisen) Schneider. The parents of Mr. Schneider, who were also natives of the Fatherland, came to the United States in 1854, on July 13th of which year they settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where Mr. Schneider found employment at the trade of carpenter. Later the family moved to Lake township, settling on a small farm, and eventually came to Appleton, and Mr. Schneider's death occurred at the home of his daughter in Center township, his wife having passed away in 1855 in Milwaukee. John Schneider was the seventh of his parents' ten children, and he secured his education in the public schools of Germany. He was nearly twenty years of age when the family came to the United States, and his first employment was at weaving in a Manitowoc factory. Later, at the age of twenty-three years, he took up carpentering as a vocation, and for ten years worked at that trade in Milwaukee, but eventually went to Washington county, where he engaged in the hoop and stave business, furnishing hoops for the breweries. He then came to Appleton, where he followed the business until 1885, and in that year bought the thirty-eight acre farm on which he now resides, although he is retired from active life, his son doing the active work around the farm. This property, which is very valuable, being located inside the city limits, is equipped with a full quota of buildings, all of a solid, substantial and modern nature, and here Mr. Schneider intends to spend the remainder of his life. In addition he owns one of the city livery barns, located on Superior street, south of College avenue. Fraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows, and in politics he is a Republican, although he has never aspired to office. He was reared in the faith of the Catholic church, but is not now connected with any denomination, although any worthy cause can count upon his support.

On August 5, 1871, Mr. Schneider was married to Amelia Michler, born September 23, 1849, in Oelkmark, Prussia, daughter of Gottfried and Maria (Bull) Michler, natives of that place. Mr. and Mrs. Michler came to America in 1853, locating first at Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and later removing to Sheboygan, where Mr. Michler died in 1886, his wife having passed away n 1865. They had six children, of whom Mrs. Schneider was the third. Mr. and Mrs. Schneider had a family of eight children; John, born July 22, 1872, engaging in the hardware business at Two Rivers, Wisconsin; William, born July 22, 1875, who is connected with the feed business in Appleton; Frederick, born December 21, 1877, who died June 7, 1901; Katherine, born October 19, 1879, who is single and resides at home; Mildred, born April 1, 1882, who is single and a teacher in the high school at Galesville, Wisconsin; George, born March 1, 1884, who is a bookkeeper for a lumber company; Frank, born October 13, 1886, attending to the duties of the home farm; and Andrew, born February 13, 1889, who is attending college at Appleton.

CHARLES HEUBNER, who ranks high among the agriculturists of Ellington township, has been engaged to some extent in public affairs and is now serving as school clerk and treasurer of his township. He is a son of John Heubner, who came from Germany to the United States in 1852, stopping at Milwaukee for two years, where he worked by the day. He was married there to Fredericka Harback, who was born in Germany and came to this country after her father's death, with her mother, Johanna Harback, who died in Waupaca county. After leaving Milwaukee, John Heubner went to Winnebago county, where he homesteaded a farm for three years, later selling it and buying land which became the old homestead. He served in Company E,------------------------ Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry during the War of the Rebellion, at the close of which he received an honorable discharge. During the last one and one-half years he has been a resident of the Soldiers' Home, at Milwaukee, being eighty-four years of age, while his wife, who is seventy-nine years old, is still a resident of the old homestead. Charles Heubner was one of thirteen children, and was born Februarv 6, 1862, on the old home place in Waupaca county, receiving his education in the district schools of that neighborhood, at such times when he could be spared from his farm duties. His last school term was when he was sixteen years old, and the age of eighteen years found him learning the trade of carpenter, which he followed until he reached his majority. In 1883 he was married to Anna Levine, daughter of August and Sophia (Danke) Levine, who lived in Waupaca and Outagamie counties and died in 1873. They came from Germany during the '50s, and spent their lives in agricultural pursuits. At the time of his marriage, Mr. Huebner purchased the property which he is now operating, although at the time of its purchase it was uncultivated and did not reach the acreage of which it now boasts. In addition to adding to his property from time to time and clearing and putting it under cultivation, Mr. Heubner has erected new buildings and repaired the old, and stocked his farm with first class machinery and appurtenances and supplied it with good stock. In 1890 Mr. Heubner was elected school clerk and served three years in that office, and he is now the incumbent of that position by virtue of his election in 1909, and also served as assessor, being chosen for that office in 1911. He and Mrs. Heubner are members of the German Lutheran church, of Hortonia, and have been the parents of twelve children: Anna, who married Henry Lippert; Charles, who learned the carpenter's trade and cement work, but makes his home with his parents, and Robert, Alma, Allis, Henry, Minnie, Fred, Arthur, Delia and Dalia, twins, and Helen, all at home.

WALTER BEAN, who is carrying on an extensive business in Seymour, Wisconsin, as proprietor of the Seymour Valley Cheese Factory, is a son of Solomon and Harriet Thorpe (Brunette) Bean. Solomon Bean was born March 4, 1839, in Clyde, St. Clair county, Michigan, a son of Richard and Mary (Laucar) Bean. On August 1, 1861, Solomon Bean enrolled as a soldier at Port Huron, Michigan, becoming a member of Company K, Second Michigan Cavalry, assigned to the department of Northern Missouri under General Pope. During the following spring the company was brigaded into the Third Michigan Cavalry, under General Gordon Granger, and saw active service at Island No. 10, Monterey, Boonville, Block Island and Baldwin. On October 20, 1882, Mr. Bean received his honorable discharge on account of disability, and returned to his home. By profession a carpenter and mechanic, Mr. Bean during the '60s built some of the first houses in Shiocton and Seymour, Wisconsin, but it was not until 1883 that he located in Seymour to reside permanently, and here his death occurred. Mrs. Bean died May 24, 1893, aged fifty-four years. They were married December 8, 1864, she being the widow of James R. Thorpe, who was the youngest son of Sir Thorpe of England and who came to Green Bay from Philadelphia to buy some of the first land in this section. He enlisted for service during the Civl War, and was killed while on garrison duty at Philadelphia. Mrs. Bean was a daughter of Prudent Brunette, the first settler of Green Bay, who took part in the hostilities between the whites and the Chippewa Indians. She had four children by her marriage with Mr Thorpe, namely: John, Mrs. M. S. Parner, Mrs. John R. Shepherd and Richard. Seven children were born to Solomon and Harriet Bean, namely: George; Carrie, who married Thomas Shier; Walter, Herbert, Myrtle, Harriet and Claud.

Walter Bean secured his education in the graded and high schools of Seymour, and when he was fifteen years old began working at the butcher trade for Albert Kuehne, with whom he continued until he was twenty years of age. As his father had been a soldier in the Civil War and his grandfather, Richard Bean, a soldier during the War of 1812 and the Blackhawk War, it was only natural that during the Spanish-American War young Bean should enlist under his country's flag, and he became a member of a well-known company of Wisconsin Volunteers, enlisting at Green Bay, Wisconsin, and serving nine months. On his return to Seymour he learned the trade of cheesemaking and in 1911 he purchased the Seymour Valley Cheese Factory, which has a capacity of 8,000 pounds. Mr. Bean was born July 8, 1877, and on January 4, 1907, he was married to Mary Agnes Beaulitte, who was born April 12, 1885, at Cochrane, Wisconsin, and to this union there have been born two children: Richard, born February 1, 1909, and Margaret, born December 28, 1910.

FRANK SIMEON SPENCER, a well-known resident and practical farmer of Grand Chute township, who is carrying on general operations on a tract of forty acres, was born April 24, 1852, in County Russell, Canada, a son of Blanchard and Eliza (Smith) Spencer. The parents of Mr. Spencer were natives of Vermont, where the father was born October 3, 1825, and the mother August 16, 1828. Early in life Blanchard Spencer commenced working in the Canadian lumber camps, but in 1854 he came to Wisconsin, locating on a tract of wild land in Outagamie county, and continued to farm in Grand Chute township until February 25, 1869, when he met an accidental death, when a log fell upon him. His wife had passed away in 1853. Mr. Spencer had become well known and highly esteemed during his residence in this section, and served in various township offices and as chairman of the town board. Frank Simeon Spencer received his education in the schools of Grand Chute township and Shiocton, and was seventeen years old at the time of his father's death., He continued to live on the farm for about two years, and then rented it until going to work in the woods, where he was employed until 1875, and in this year purchased the forty-acre tract just adjoining the old family homestead, and here he has continued to live to the present time. He carries on truck and general farming, in addition to dairying, and his hard and persistent labor has brought a gratifying success. He is connected with the E. F. U., and is a Republican in politics, having served for eighteen years as school treasurer of Grand Chute township.

On November 10, 1875, Mr. Spencer was married (first) to Martha Finkel, who was born in Canada and died in 1886, leaving no children. On July 24, 1888, he was married to Miss Olive Rexford, who was born at Shiocton, Outagamie county, May 18, 1862, daughter of Sanford and Mary (Downes) Rexford, the former born November 19, 1834, at Johnsburg, Warren county, New York, and the latter August 5, 1834, at Hartford, New York. Mr. Rexford, who was always a farmer, came to Wisconsin in 1855, and located at Shiocton, buying a farm in Ellington township on which he resided until 1857, at which time he bought the farm that was later known as Rexford's Corners. He lived there the balance of his life, his death occurring January 21, 1889, while his widow survived him eleven years, passing away February 11, 1900. She was married January 29, 1891, to Silas R. Merrill, a retired resident of Neenah. By her first marriage she had three children: Harvey S., a farmer of Shiocton; Olive, who married Mr. Spencer, and Elmer, who is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Spencer have been the parents of three children, namely: Blanche Mary, born May 27, 1890, who married Harry T. Ogilvie, a real estate agent of Madison; Frank E., born May 13, 1893, residing at home, and Rexford L., born April 26, 1895, who is attending the Appleton high school.

JACOB FRED WASSERBACH, the owner of sixty acres of well-cultivated land in Grand Chute township, on which he is engaged in dairy farming, was born October 30, 1871, in Wittenberg, Germany, and is a son of George and Mary (Breith) Wasserbach. The parents of Mr. Wasserbach, both natives of the Fatherland, came to America in 1882, and located at Algoma, Kewaunee county, Wisconsin, where Mr. Wasserbach was engaged in shoemaking until his retirement a few years ago, though he is now living retired. His wife died in February 23, 1898, having been the mother of nine children, of whom Jacob Fred was the eldest. He attended the schools of Germany and after coming to America received schooling at Algoma until he was seventeen years old, at which time he began sailing on the Great Lakes and Green Bay. After spending three years as a sailor, he began working in a Milwaukee shoe factory, but after one year went to Algoma, and during the two years that followed he was engaged in farming and other occupations. Seven years were spent on a dredge boat in the employ of the United States Government, but he eventually returned to Algoma, and after three years there came to Grand Chute township and bought a twenty-acre farm. After four years he sold this property and moved to his present location, three and one-half miles west of the city limits of Appleton, where he has a fine farm of sixty acres, devoted to dairy farming. He has always been a hard and faithful worker, and the success that he has achieved is but the just reward of conscientious effort well directed. He has always taken an interest in affairs pertaining to the welfare of his community, but he takes an independent stand in political matters and has never aspired to public office. being too busily occupied with his business affairs. He and Mrs. Wasserbach are members of the Lutheran church.

On December 30, 1897, Mr. Wasserbach was married to Miss Louise Maack, who was born January 9, 1875, in Champaign county, Illinois, a daughter of William and Bertha (Peplaw) Maack, the former a native of Germany and the latter of Champaign county, Illinois. Mr. Maack, who throughout life was engaged in farming, came to Algoma, Wisconsin, in 1886, and there resided until his death in January, 1895, and his widow now survives him and makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. Bramer, of Appleton. Mrs. Wasserbach was the second of her parents' six children. Two children have been born to her and her husband, namely: Leon George William, born May 12, 1901; and Marvin Fred Paul, born January 10, 1905.

JOHN D. WILHARMS, deceased. The late John D. Wilharms was a prominent and highly respected farmer of Outagamie county, and an old resident of Grand Chute township. He built up for himself a lasting reputation as a man possessing most excellent personal traits of character, was upright and honorable in his business transactions and imbued with that generous public spirit that was always ready to assist in whatever was calculated to promote the welfare of his county and community. Mr. Wilharms was born April 17, 1847, at Cedarsburg, Wisconsin, a son of Christopher and Charlotte Wilharms, who are natives of Germany, where the father was born in 1809 and the mother in 1813. They came direct to Cedarsburg on coming to the United States in 1847, and Mr. Wilharms was engaged in weaving there until 1852, in which year he went to Manitowoc county and settled on a farm, and continued to carry on operations there until the declining years of his life, when he moved to the city of Manitowoc and there his death occurred at the age of ninety-two years, his wife being eighty-eight years old when she passed away the day following his death. Both were buried the same day. They were the parents of eight children, of whom John D. was the fifth. He attended school in Manitowoc county, and made his home with his parents, and in 1877 was married. For seven years after this event he resided on the home farm, but in 1884 he bought eighty acres of land in Grand Chute township, and here continued to reside until his death, September 12, 1900, at which time he owned 136 acres one-half mile from the city of Appleton. He carried on general farming, cattle breeding and dairying, and his widow has, continued these occupations since her husband's death and has added a twenty-four acre tract to the estate, adjoining the homestead, and now occupied by her son. Mr. Wilharms was a member of the Lutheran church, and in political matters he was a democrat, but never aspired to office.

On May 23, 1877, Mr. Wilharms was married to Mary Kellner, who was born in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, Kossuth township, June 21, 1856, daughter of Michael and Mary (Alt) Kellner, the former born in Austria, September 12, 1822, and the latter in Germany, February 12, 1832. Mr. Kellner came to America with his parents, via Quebec, Canada, having worked at the latter place in a tannery, and on locating in Manitowoc county, he took up a claim and worked in a tannery, later building up a grocery business and a saw and shingle mill. Eventually he started a general store at what is now Kellnersville, became postmaster there and so continued to the time of his death, also serving as justice of the peace for a long period. He was a very well educated man, speaking three languages, German, Bohemian and English, and was well read and well versed in all topics of the day. His death occurred September 22, 1890, while his widow survives him and resides at the old homestead in Kellnersville. Mrs. Wilharms was the second in order of birth of her parents' nine children. She and Mr. Wilharms had the following children: Lillian, born November 29, 1878, who married Andrew F. Petersen, proprietor of the township cheese factory, where they reside; William C., born September 3, 1881, who married Rosana Miller and lives in Grand Chute township, where he is engaged in farming; Clara, born May 24, 1884, who married Orville Babb, a conductor on the Interurban Line, residing at Appleton: Edith, born May 12, 1886, who married John Meidam, a carpenter of Appleton; Joseph C., born November 17, 1887; John William, born March 8, 1890 and Lorena Bertha, born August 21, 1893, all residing at home; Amanda, born December 19, 1895, who died September 12, 1903; and Irma Mariah, born July 12, 1898, who lives at home.

FRANCIS J. ROONEY, who is engaged in an extensive law practice at Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in Sheboygan county, March 25, 1866, a son of Thomas and Ellen (Murphy) Rooney, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Massachusetts. Thomas Rooney came to the United States in 1848, and in April, 1855, came to Sheboygan county, where he took up wild land and established a home. In 1862 he married Ellen Murphy, and he continued to engage in agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in Sheboygan county July 5, 1895, his widow still surviving him. They had a family of five children. Francis J. Rooney received his preliminary educational training in the public schools, after which he entered the normal school at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and secured his legal training at Valparaiso, Indiana, graduating there June 1, 1898. He practiced for a short time with Gillen & Hughes, at Sheboygan, and February 1, 1899, located at Seymour, Wisconsin, where he was elected district attorney. Among the many cases prosecuted by Mr. Rooney was the well-known Paul Krause case, the prisoner being convicted of murdering his divorced wife and being sent to the penitentiary for life. He served for seven years as city attorney of Seymour, and then changed his residence to Appleton where he has since continued in a general practice. Mr. Rooney was married June 27, 1906, to Margaret E. O'Connel, a native of Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, and a daughter of John and Margaret O'Connel, farming people of that locality. Two children have been born: to Mr. and Mrs. Rooney, namely: Margaret, born March 7, 1908, and Thomas F., born February 16, 1910. Mr. Rooney is an active democrat in politics, and one of the leaders of his party in this section. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Eagles, the Equitable Fraternal Union and the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Rooney are members of the Catholic church. The comfortable family residence is situated in Appleton, and Mr. Rooney may always be counted upon to assist with his time and means any movement which has for its object the advancement of his adopted city.

MOSES BENDER, who has been a resident of Seymour for more than a quarter of a century, has been engaged in business here for fifteen years, during the last ten of which he has carried on stock buying and real estate dealing with a large degree of success. Mr. Bender is a native of Germany, being born February 7, 1867, in Province on the Rhein, Prussia, a son of David and Wilhelmina (Hammel) Bender, natives of that country, where the father, a cattle buyer, died in 1896, aged eighty years, and the mother still survives. They were the parents of eight children, namely: Emil, Jennette, Leopold, Rudolph, Henry, Rosalia, Moses and Carl, of whom the last named died when eight years of age. Besides Moses, Henry and Rosalia were the only children of this family to come to the United States.

Moses Bender was seventeen years of age when he came to this country, his education having been secured in the schools of Germany, and his first employment was in a Milwaukee wholesale clothing house, where he remained for eleven months. He then came to Seymour, where he became a clerk in the establishment of M. Bodenheimer, in whose employ he continued for eleven years, at the end of which time he was taken into partnership in the business, the firm name becoming Bodenheimer & Company. This business, which was of a general mercantile nature, was continued until 1902, when the partnership was dissolved, and Mr. Bender engaged in the real estate business and the buying and shipping of fine work and draft horses, and his business has extended to such a degree that he has opened a branch office and barn at Gillett, Oconto county. Mr. Bender is an excellent business man, and his success is due to his own perseverance and ability, as he started in life with no advantages. He divides his time between Seymour and Appleton, having a home at No. 781 Union street in the latter city. He is a stockholder in both the First National and Seymour State Banks. In political matters he adheres to the principles of the republican party, which he has served as a member of the county central committee, but he has never aspired to public office.

In 1896. Mr. Bender was married to Selma Hammel, who was born in Appleton, Wisconsin, daughter of Jacob Hammel, of that city, and two children have been born to this union: David Emil and Julian Leopold.

ROBERT W. SCHULZE, who during the past eight years has been engaged with the farming interests of Greenville township, is now operating a tract of fifty-two acres adjoining Greenville Station, and was born in this township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, September 16, 1855, a son of Daniel and Henrietta (Schmidt) Schulze, pioneer settlers of this section. Daniel Schulze was born in Gernany, and first came to Greenville township in 1855, after seven years spent in Milwaukee. He settled in a rude log house in section 3, and he had but two neighbors between Greenville village, only one and one-half miles to the south, and the city of Appleton, the country between and surrounding being practically a virgin wilderness. In order to get a start, Daniel Schulze was engaged for some time in chopping wood, at two shillings a cord, and when he could spare time for other duties he worked hard at clearing his farm to put it under cultivation, and as his sons grew up they assisted in the work. Thrift and perseverance finally had their reward, and at the time of Mr. Schulze's death, in 1889, he was the owner of 460 acres of finely cultivated land. He was a member of the Lutheran Church, and his interment took place in the Greenville Center cemetery. In his political belief he was a democrat. Mr. Schulze's first wife bore him two children: Charles of Appleton, and Martin of Greenville township; and by his second wife, a widow, Mrs. Henrietta Schmidt, he had four children: August of Ellington: Daniel, a farmer of Greenville township; Robert William; and Frank, a successful farmer of Greenville township; Robert William Schulze attended the district schools of Greenville township, and at the age of fifteen years began to learn the trade of blacksmith at Hortonville. For three years he served as an apprentice, and then spent a winter in the lumber camps, after which he returned to Greenville township, and secured employment with Mr. Meyer, at what was then Bear Creek Corners. After three years he was admitted to partnership with his employer, and this connection continued for ten years, at the end of which time Mr. Schulze severed his association and opened an establishment of his own at the same place. In 1903 he purchased his present farm and moved his shop to Greenville Station, continuing to operate it there for four years and then selling it to his son, since which time he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits. He stands in the front ranks of the progressive farmers of his section, and commands the respect of all for his integrity and many admirable traits of character. He is independent in his political views, voting rather for the man than the party, and has served in a businesslike manner as a member of the township board. With Mrs. Schulze he attends the Lutheran Church. On February 28, 1879, Mr. Schulze was united in marriage with Lena Reppenhagen, who was born in Greenville township, December 23, 1862, daughter of Frank and Louisa (Maurman) Reppenhagen, natives of the Fatherland, where Mrs. Reppenhagen was born August 20, 1829, and her husband a few years before. He died about 1890. As a young man he came to the United States, and for a short time resided in Milwaukee, then removing to West Bend, Wisconsin, where he owned a farm. Eventually he removed to Greenville township, where he became a landowner, and there resided until his death. His widow, who survives him, makes her home in Appleton with her daughter, Mrs. Charles Schulze, who is the only other survivor besides Mrs. Robert W. Schulze of a family of four children. Mr. and Mrs. Robert W. Schulze have had six children: Otto, born July 27, 1880, a blacksmith of Greenville, residing on his father's farm; Anna, born October 31, 1883, wife of Fred Holtz, a resident of Appleton; Harry, born May 26, 1886, engaged in the lumber and general mercantile business at Greenville; Paul, born June 11, 1889, residing at home; Leonard, born June 4, 1898, also living at home; and George, the first born of this family, who is deceased.

HERMAN BLEICK, who for more than a quarter of a century has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in Outagamie county, is the owner of a fine farm in Greenville township, and a member of one of this section's oldest and most honored families. He was born August 26, 1860, in Greenville township, and is a son of John and Louisa (Brockman) Bleick, natives of Germany, where the former was born December 24, 1835, and the latter January 26, 1826. John Bleick was about fourteen years of age when he came to America with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Bleick, and the other children, Ludwig and Dorothy. The family in the old country had been in rather humble circumstances, Frederick Bleick being a laboring man, but he eventually sold his property to furnish means for transportation to the New World, and in 1849 the little band of emigrants started out to cross the ocean. The trip was made from Hamburg to Quebec, and thence also by boat to Milwaukee, and was filled with many perils and hardships, but the sturdy little party kept straight on, and after locating in Milwaukee worked for a year at whatever any or all of the members of the party could find to do. At this time the Green Bay region was being opened up by homeseekers, and thence Frederick Bleick took his family, making the trip by ox team to Outagamie county, and hauling their household effects with them. Settling in section 10, after a journey that taxed even the strength of these hardy Germans, on land that had been pre-empted some time before by the sons, John and Ludwig, the family found the chance it had been looking for, and the parents here had a home during the remainder of their lives. John Bleick had received a German education in his native country, but had not had the advantages of an English education, and in fact never attended an English school in his life. On coming to this country he had begun life under somewhat of a handicap, it having been necessary to go into debt for most of the farm purchase money, but he was young and strong, the latter fact being emphasized by his feat of carrying fifty pounds of flour to his home from the village of Little Chute. In addition, he split rails at thirty cents per hundred, chopped wood at thirty cents per cord, and did any honest labor that came his way. The first Bleick home was a little log shanty, roofed with split basswood, and in this the family lived while the father and boys were clearing the farm from the forest, there having been no clearing of any kind when they first located there. Wild animals were still to be found in numbers, and a huge black bear full of fight, gave John Bleick a bad quarter of an hour on one occasion when he was returning from Appleton. In 1855, John Bleick was married at Greenville, to Louisa Brockman, also a native of Germany, and they located on a farm in Greenville township, on which he spent the remainder of his life. The first eighty acres of land which he owned were mostly of swamp, but at the time of his death he was the owner of 227 acres, over 200 of which were in excellent condition, all acquired through years of intelligent and unremitting labor. Mr. Bleick died in 1902, in the faith of the Lutheran Church. He was a democrat in politics, but preferred to give most of his attention to his farming interests, although he served as his sense of public duty told him in various township offices. His widow, who still survives, makes her home with her son Herman. Mr. and Mrs. Bleick had a family of eight children, as follows: Minnie, who married C. A. Gielow of Manitowoc; Charles, engaged in farming in Greenville township; Augusta, who married Gus Zuehlke of Hortonville; Herman; Lizzie, who married Ed. Wigert of Dale township; Ferdinand of Greenville township; and Ida, who is deceased.

Herman Bleick attended the public schools of Greenville township, and remained on the home farm until his marriage, at which time he removed to his present fine farm of 100 acres, which he devotes to general farming and the raising of fine live stock. He is a member of the Equitable Fraternal Union, and in politics is independent, having never aspired to office. He belongs to the Lutheran Church. On October 22, 1885, Mr. Bleick was married to Mary Schroth, who was born in Ellington township, March 23, 1860, daughter of George and Mary (Bahler) Schroth, natives of Germany. George Schroth came to the United States as a young man, and after spending six months in New York State he came to Ellington township, Outagamie county, where he bought a farm. He died in 1867, aged thirty-four years, from the effects of his army service, he having been a member of Company G, a regiment of Wisconsin Infantry. His widow, who was born November 10, 1836, died in 1903, and of their six children Mrs. Bleick was the third in order of birth. The three children of Mr. and Mrs. Bleick, all of whom reside at home, are: Lillian, born May 21, 1888; Ella, born February 16, 1891; and Leona, born July 26, 1896.

JOHN HAUG, who has been a resident of the city of Appleton for more than a quarter of a century, has been identified with the Appleton Brewing Company ever since its organization, and now is acting in the capacity of brewmaster. He is a native of Germany, and learned the art of brewing in the Fatherland, coming in 1882 to the United States and working at his trade in Ohio for four years at Bellefontaine, although he spent a short time on a farm. On coming to Appleton, he was first employed by Freis & Walters, and rose to the position of brewmaster in 1896, and when the Appleton Brewing Company opened its brewery in Appleton his services were secured in the same capacity. Mr. Haug went to Chicago in 1899 to attend the Wahl-Henins Institute of Fermentology, and he was graduated therefrom on June 1 of that year, when he returned to Appleton. Mr. Haug was married to May Alberty of Appleton, and they are members of the Sacred Heart Catholic Church. They have had four children, of whom two are deceased. In politics Mr. Haug is a democrat.

CHARLES A. SCHMIDT, who has a fine farm of eighty acres in Grand Chute township, is a native of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, having been born in Greenville township, April 15, 1860, a son of Joseph and Theresa (Kommer) Schmidt, natives of Austria, where the father was born in 1826 and the mother two years later. They came to America in 1858, and located on a farm in Greenville township, and here the father met his death, January 1, 1862, when he was murdered by an Indian. Mrs. Schmidt continued to live on the farm until 1905, in which year she accompanied her son to Grand Chute township, and here her death occurred in 1908. Charles A. Schmidt was the fifth of the ten children of his parents, and he obtained his educational training in the common schools of Greenville township, although he had to start to work for himself at an early age, on account of his father's death. He was only thirteen years old when he started to work out among the farmers of his neighborhood, and when he was sixteen he learned the carriagemaker's trade at Hortonville. He worked at that trade in Hortonville for six years, spent six months at Milwaukee and a like term in Menasha, and for two years worked for Adam Richter, in Appleton, but at the end of this time went back to the old homestead, which he later bought. Here he resided until April, 1905, when he sold the old home in Greenville township and bought his present farm, on which he has since been operating very successfully. He has developed this property into one of the finest of its size in the township, and its well kept appearance and general aspect of prosperity speak well for the industry and farming ability of its owner. Mr. Schmidt devotes all of his time to his agricultural operations and finds no time for politics, although he is an adherent of democratic principles and has served as district school clerk. His religious connection is with St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, at Appleton.

On September 15, 1885, Mr. Schmidt was united in marriage to Miss Anna Miller, who was born in Dale township, Outagamie county, September 15, 1865, daughter of Mathias and Lucy Miller, who were natives of Prussia, and early settlers of Outagamie county. Eleven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt, namely: Frank, who is connected with the Ideal Lumber and Coal Company of Appleton; Emma, who is bookkeeper for the Appleton Chair Factory; and Edward, John, Lizzie, Charles, Martin, Mathias, Louis, Joseph and Mary, all residing at home.

CHARLES F. SMITH, president of the C. F. Smith Stone Company, proprietor of a large livery establishment in Appleton, and the owner of a fine stock farm in Outagamie county, was born September 18, 1856, in Lawrence, St. Lawrence county, New York, and is a son of Robert and Emeline (Micham) Smith, the former a native of Maine and the latter of New York. Until fifteen years of age Mr. Smith attended the public schools of Minnesota, whence his father had brought his family at an early date, and he then engaged at various kinds of work until becoming interested in a bee business in Columbia county. He came to Appleton in 1884 and established his present livery business, buying out Mr. Truner, for whom he had worked, and he has built up one of the largest industries of its kind in Northern Wisconsin, having a four-story barn, 48x125 feet, which is fitted throughout with every modern appliance and convenience, including complete elevator service. His stone quarry, from which he supplies the trade with crushed stone, lime and sandstone, produces about 5,000 yards of crushed stone and 1,000 cords of building stone per year, employs the services of fifteen men and was established in 1897. His stock farm in Outagamie county, where he breeds fine Holstein cattle, covers 227 acres.

In June, 1884, Mr. Smith was married to Miss Mary Powers, daughter of William and Mary (Galom) Powers, natives of Ireland, and they have had five children, namely: Hattie, Marie, Lucile, Raymond and ----------------. Mr. Smith is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin, the Catholic Foresters, the Eagles and the Elks, and is a democrat in politics. The family is connected with St. Mary's Catholic Church. Mr. Smith is a good representative of the self-made man, having achieved success through his own efforts, and has proved himself in every way a most desirable citizen.

JOHN AUGUST HILGER, an energetic citizen and practical agriculturist of Outagamie county, cultivating a tract of eighty-seven acres in Greenville township, was born in Menominee township, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, October 8, 1863, and is a son of William Joseph and Clara (Ulman) Hilger. The, father was born November 1, 1817, at Ulheim on the Rhein, Germany, and came to the United States in 1842-3, locating in Menominee township, Waukesha county, where he worked for others. Industrious and persevering in whatever he undertook, he at once started working for others, but during the following year his father came to this country and bought land, and William J. went to work for him. At the time of his father's death he became the owner of eighty acres of land, to which he added from time to time, until when he died he was the owner of 200 acres of fine land, in addition to having $6,000 drawing interest, and other property. He served as assessor and on the board of supervisors of his township and was a well known and highly respected citizen. Mr. Hilger was married at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, to Miss Clara Ulman, also a native of Ulheim on the Rhein, where she was born in 1827, and they had a family of twelve children, of whom John August was the sixth in order of birth. He received a common school education at Fussville, Waukesha county, and at the age of twenty-one years began working for his father. One and one-half years later he commenced renting land on which to farm, and two years later moved to Outagamie county and rented his father-in-law's farm for two years. He then bought his present farm of eighty-seven acres in Greenville township, which at that time was very much neglected, the buildings poor and the soil unfertile. The latter trouble has been remedied by scientific methods, Mr. Hilger being an expert in crop rotation, while the former defect was obliterated by replacing the old buildings with new ones, his residence being especially handsome and fitted with all modern conveniences. He carries on general farming and also does some dairying and stock raising, devoting his entire time and attention to his farm. In politics he is independent, and he and Mrs. Hilger are members of the Greenville Roman Catholic Church. On October 21, 1891, Mr. Hilger was married to Effie K. Hauf, who was born in Ellington township, Outagamie county, January 12, 1866, daughter of William and Theresa (Freis) Hauf, the former born in Rhine Province, near a town in Germany, and the latter in Bavaria. They were married in Menominee township, Waukesha county, Wisconsin. Mr. Hauf had come to the United States in the later '50s, going direct to Milwaukee, and worked for other people, then coming to Outagamie county and purchasing land in Ellington township. He resided on this farm until his retirement, when he removed to Appleton, where his wife died two years later and he returned to the old homestead. He died in 1907, having been the father of nine children, Mrs. Hilger being the eighth in order of birth. She received a public school education in Ellington, and later attended a parochial school in Greenville township. Mr. and Mrs. Hilger have had twelve children, as follows: Clara, William Joseph, Michael Leonard, Charles Henry, Irene, Cecelia, Veronica, John, Edwin, Margaret, Angeline and Adeline, all being at home except Angeline, who is deceased.

PAUL SCHROEDER, manager of the Fox River Valley Marble, Granite and Cut Stone Works, at Appleton, Wisconsin, doing the largest business in its line in the city, was born in Appleton in 1874, a son of Albert and Sophia (Muenster) Schroeder, natives of Germany. Mr. Schroeder's father on first coming to Appleton connected himself with the Appleton Woolen Mills, but after a short period engaged in the furniture business, in which he was engaged for about twenty years, having an establishment on the present site of the Merrimac Theatre. Later he engaged in the coal and wood business, in which he was engaged at the time of his death, April 30, 1890. His widow was married a second time to Fred Pauls, a native of Germany and one of Appleton's pioneer citizens, and she died in 1907. Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder had the following children: Martha, who is a resident of Seymour, Wisconsin; Emma, living at Monmouth, Illinois; Paul; Edith, who is deceased; Alma of Chicago; and Louis, a resident of Appleton, engaged in wire weaving. Paul Schroeder received his education in the public schools, after leaving which he learned the marble and granite cutting trade with Adolph Jenss. In 1896 he went into business with G. C. Newmann, who sold out later to Fred Pauls, and for a time thereafter Mr. Schroeder was engaged in business by himself. In December, 1904, he bought an interest in the Fox River Valley Marble, Granite and Cut Stone works, of which he has been manager ever since. Compressed air is used in this business and it demands the services of fifteen to twenty men to handle the large orders that come in from a radius of within sixty miles of Appleton.

In 1897, Mr. Schroeder was married to May Gainor, of Appleton, daughter of Michael and Hannah Gainor, the former a merchant of Nashville. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder, namely: Cloyd and Bernice. Mr. Schroeder is a member of the Eagles, and his father for many years was a well known Odd Fellow.

JOHN HEIMAN, who is cultivating an excellent tract of ninety acres of farming land in Grand Chute township, has spent his entire life in this part of Outagamie county, having been born in Grand Chute township, April 3, 1873, a son of Henry and Anna (Jackman) Heiman, the former born in Holland in October, 1832, and the latter in Germany in May, 1842. The father came to the United States during the year 1858, and located at Oconto, Wisconsin, where he engaged in the hotel business for several years, and also engaged in ship loading and any other enterprise that promised fair returns for labor expended. Later he bought the farm on which John Heiman now lives, and at the time of his retirement, in 1904, he had accumulated 220 acres of choice land in Grand Chute township. His death came two years after his retirement, in Appleton, his wife having passed away in 1905. They were the parents of nine children, Mr. Heiman of Grand Chute township being the fifth born. He attended the common township schools, and also spent two years at St. Joseph's Catholic school, and until he was twenty-eight years of age he worked for his father. At this time he was married, and he rented a part of the homestead for two years, at the end of which period he bought the property he now owns, a finely cultivated property of ninety acres, equipped with modern, substantial buildings, and worked to the best of advantage with power farm machinery of the latest make. He devotes his entire time to his farm, and carries on general farming, cattle breeding and dairying. Mr. Heiman is a member of St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church, and in his political views he is independent.

On April 30, 1901, Mr. Heiman was married to Crecentia Mader, who was born in Bavaria, Germany, May 25, 1881, daughter of Joseph and Crecentia Mader, who came to America in 1882 and located in Appleton, where Mr. Mader worked as a carpenter and mason for one year and then went to Gresham, Shawano county, Wisconsin, where he bought sixty acres of land in the village, and also conducts a furniture store. He and his wife, who is also surviving, have had seven children, Mrs. Heiman being the second in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Heiman have had three children, namely: Marie Anna, born July 5, 1902; Frank, born October 28, 1904; and Andrew, born January 27, 1908. Mr. Heiman is a member of St. Joseph's Society.

LOUIS ROSSBERG, one of the old and honored residents of Greenville township, where he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits for many years, is now cultivating an excellent tract of eighty-eight acres. He is a native of Saxony, Germany, born November 11, 1831 a son of William and Rosena Rossberg, natives of Saxony, where the father was born December 20, 1807, and the mother in 1809. They came to the United States in 1847, settling in Centerville township, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, where the mother died in 1877, while the father passed away in 1884, near Sheboygan Falls. In his native country Mr. Rossberg had been a carpenter by trade, but after coming to this country he was engaged in farming and fruit growing. Louis Rossberg received his education in the schools of his native country and at the age of fourteen years began working in a glass factory, later learning the miller's trade. On coming to this country he began to assist his father to clear the wild farm of 160 acres, but in 1853 left home and went to the copper mines near Superior, where he spent about five years. He then returned to the homestead at Sheboygan and engaged in pier building and shipping wood by vessels to Chicago and other points, and later went to Apple Creek, in Grand Chute township, where for seven years he was engaged in the saloon business. At the end of this time he purchased his present farm, a fine tract of eighty-eight acres, where he carries on general farming and dairying. He is a member of the Lutheran Church and a republican in politics. In August, 1869, Mr. Rossberg was married to Henrietta Schiermyer, who was born in Germany, and they have had three children: Frank, who is operating the homestead farm with his father; Louis, who lives in Appleton; and Otto, who is employed in a factory in Appleton.

LOUIS A. PETERSEN, whose fine farm of 105 acres is located only one-quarter of a mile west of the city limits of Appleton, Wisconsin, is one of the good practical farmers of Grand Chute township, and a well-known and respected citizen. Born in Appleton, April 19, 1873, Mr. Petersen is a son of John A. and Wilhelmina (Freiberg) Petersen, natives of Germany. John A. Petersen was born in Holstein, Germany, in 1840 or 1841, and his wife in Prussia in 1850, and they were married in Appleton, Wisconsin, whence John A. Petersen had come in 1880. He first worked for the government at dredge work, continuing this until he had money enough to go into the butcher business with his brother, Fred, they having the first establishment of its kind in the city, but later they dissolved partnership, and each continued in business alone. Later John A. Petersen moved onto a farm one and one-half miles outside of Appleton, although he continued in the butcher business about eighteen years thereafter, when because of failing health he moved to the farm for eleven years, and then engaged in the butcher business again, but one and one-half years later he was taken suddenly sick and died, he being then about eighty-six or eighty-seven years old. He was a stockholder in the old chair factory, and a member of the Odd Fellows, and became prominent as a citizen and a business man. His widow still survives him and resides in Appleton.

Louis A. Petersen attended the public schools and the old Ryan high school, which he left at the age of nineteen years. During his vacations he had been working for the grocery stores in Appleton, and after leaving school he learned the tanner's trade, and worked for Slosser, Baird & Company several years, and after leaving this concern he established himself in the hardware business and continued therein for seven years. After selling this business, Mr. Petersen purchased the farm on which he now resides, a tract of 105 acres lying one-quarter of a mile west of the city limits of Appleton. This makes it very convenient for him to market his general farm produce and the product of his dairy, although the excellence of his goods would make them have a ready sale wherever offered. Mr. Petersen was married June 30, 1897, to Emma Mundt, who was born in Chicago, April 22, 1876, daughter of Emanuel and Katharine (Gunthre) Mundt, natives of Germany, where the father was born October 31, 1831, and the mother February 19, 1834. The mother had been previously married in Germany, but prior to 1860 married Mr. Mundt and they came to the United States shortly afterward, locating in Chicago, where Mr. Mundt followed the occupation of tanner, a trade which he had learned in the Fatherland. On leaving Chicago, in 1878, Mr. Mundt came to Grand Chute township, and built a tannery on the present site of the Riverside Paper Mill, but after some years disposed of his interest in that business and built a store on College avenue, Appleton, where he dealt in hides and wool up to the time of his death, in 1894. He became a prosperous and prominent citizen, and served as alderman from his ward for several terms. His widow survived him until 1909, when she passed away, having been the mother of three children. Louis and Gustave, who are deceased; and Emma, who married Mr. Petersen. Mr. and Mrs. Petersen have been the parents of five children: Carl Louis, born June 3, 1898; Leila Clara, February 19, 1902 ; Herbert Andrew, September 11, 1904; Ruth Florence, February 25, 1907; and Willard, July 5, 1910. Mr. Petersen is a republican in politics, but he has never aspired to public office, nor is he a member of any fraternal associations, his entire time and interest being taken up by his farming operations. He is a public-spirited citizen, however, and may be counted upon to lend his influence towards promoting any movement calculated to be of benefit to his community.

RICHARD MILLER, practical business man, inventor and public-spirited citizen of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is engaged in business under the company name of Appleton Hay Tool Company, was born in Saxony, Germany, in 1845, and is a son of Michael and Martha Miller, who came to Outagamie county in 1854. Mr. Miller's parents located on a farm in Ellington township when the Indians were still in possession of a large part of this territory, and here Michael Miller manufactured shingles by hand and hunted, and later engaged in farming, residing on his property until 1899, in which year he moved to Minnesota, where his widow still resides. He had three children: Richard; Bertha, who married Christian Peters, a successful agriculturist of Minnesota; and Hulda, who is deceased. Richard Miller learned the trades of blacksmith and machinist in his youth, and when still a young man opened a shop at Stephensville, but after eight years, in 1875, he lost his possessions by fire. He then worked for the Appleton Manufacturing Company for four years, leaving that concern to engage in the manufacture of the first swivel hay carrier, which he invented. He took two others into partnership, and began the manufacture of hay tools, but in 1899 sold out his interests to the Eagle Manufacturing Company and began the Appleton Hay Tool Company, of which he has been the head to the present time. This concern, established in 1899, manufactures hay tools, hardware specialties and car movers, its best known product being the "Badger Never-Slip" car mover, which has a large sale all over the United States, and which, at a retail price of five dollars, reached a sale of over 4,000 during the year 1910. Four men are employed and water power used in a factory 80x80 feet, which is connected with the various railroads by a private side-track. In 1867, Mr. Miller was married to Marie Gratz, of Milwaukee, daughter of Ernest and Ernestina Gratz, and sister of several Civil War veterans, one of whom, Captain Gratz, lost his life during the war. Her father was a Lutheran preacher, and Mr. and Mrs. Miller are members of that church. They have had a family of four sons and four daughters. Mr. Miller is a member of the Equitable Fraternal Union. He is independent in his political views, and during his younger days served for some time as a deputy sheriff.

CHARLES KOHL. Mr. Kohl was married to Miss Clara Sturm, who was born in 1890, in Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, daughter of Joseph and Anna (Bride) Sturm. Joseph Sturm was born in Ricetown, Brown county, Wisconsin, February 17, 1862, a son of John and Frances (Pepper) Sturm, natives of Bavaria, where John Sturm was born in 1825 and his wife in 1827, and who were married in Washington county, Wisconsin, near Milwaukee. John Sturm came to America when sixteen years of age with his parents and settled in Washington county. He was reared to the life of an agriculturist and became a landowner in Washington county, but later moved to Brown county, purchasing a farm near Greenleaf. Subsequently he moved to Winnebago county and bought another farm, on which he resided until 1905, and in that year moved to Menasha and later to Appleton, where he died in 1909, his wife having died several years previous to that time. John Sturm was a soldier during the Civil War, serving as a member of Company G., in a regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, for two years, and during his service was confined to the hospital for some time. He and his wife had a family of ten children, as follows: Mary, who married Paul Moshier, a farmer near Brillion, Calumet county; John, a farmer of Winnebago county; George, who is deceased; Joseph; Frances, who is deceased; Elizabeth, the wife of John Foster, a carpenter of Appleton; Tressie, who married a butcher of Milwaukee; Gertrude, who married a Milwaukee contractor; and Jacob, a farmer of Winnebago county.

JOSEPH STURM attended the schools of Appleton and St. Joseph's Catholic school, and at the age of fifteen years started to work in the woods, and was employed as an engineer in the brick yards during the summer months until he was twenty years of age, when he engaged in the retail liquor business. After eight years spent in this line, he bought a farm in Grand Chute township, consisting of 100 acres of finely improved land, on which he devotes all of his time to general farming and stock raising. He is a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and in political matters is independent. Mr. Sturm was married in January, 1889, to Anna Bride, who was born February 2, 1870, daughter of Michael and Agatha (Mudi) Bride, natives of Bavaria, where the mother was born February 2, 1849. Mr. Bride died in Bavaria, and in 1881 his widow came to America and located in Appleton, Wisconsin, where she secured employment in the paper mills, and never returned to her native country. She had two children: Anna, who came to this country and went to work in the paper mills of Appleton until she was married, and Clara, who died in childhood. Mr. and Mrs. Sturm had seven children: Clara, who married Mr. Kohl; Anna, born March 30, 1891; George, born August 17, 1894; Fred, born August 3, 1896; Rosie, born June 14, 1898; Hugo, born February 4, 1901; and Amanda, born December 29, 1906.

JOHN FOUNTAIN, founder and president of the Fountain Lumber Company, one of the well known lumber industries of Northern Wisconsin, was born in Belgium, August 3, 1831, a son of Bernhard and Katharine Fountain, farming people of Belgium who spent their lives in that country. John Fountain came to the United States in 1861 and first located in Waukesha county, Wisconsin, where he became engaged in building and contracting. Five years later he located in Appleton, where he built many large buildings, among them St. Mary's Catholic Church and the Presbyterian structure, and in 1875, went into partnership with Andrew Hufferman. On June 8, 1868, Mr. Fountain was married to Margaret Ward, who was born in Ireland and came to the United States with her parents at the age of four years. Mrs. Fountain died in 1900, having been the mother of four children, as follows: William, manager of the Fountain Lumber Company, and a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Relief and Beneficiary Association, married Marie M. Salchert, of Appleton, and has a family of six children; Fred, a railroad man, who is a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, married Catherine Cloos; Frank is a lumber manufacturer in Taylor county, Wisconsin; and Bessie is the widow of Garrett Ruggles, and lives at home with her father. Mr. Fountain and his family are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church, and in political matters he is independent. About 1882, Mr. Fountain engaged in the lumber business in conjunction with his contracting interests, and soon gave up the latter occupation to give his entire time to the former. In 1897, the Fountain Lumber Company was established, with John Fountain, president; Walter Alexander, vice-president; Frank Fountain, secretary and treasurer; and William Fountain, manager. They now have a large trade throughout Appleton and the surrounding vicinity, and have a yard 200x300 feet.

ANTON HENES, who is now carrying on farming and stockraising on a fine property of 144 acres situated on section 34, Seymour township, has been a resident of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, for nearly forty-five years and during this time has taken a prominent part in the growth and development of this section. Mr. Henes was born October 2, 1844, in Gamertingen, Hohenzollern, Sigmaringen, Germany, a son of Ezisebias and Ursula (Goggel) Henes. His brother, John, came to the United States in 1871, and his sister Mary some time later with her parents. Anton Henes came to America in 1866, on September 11 of which year he landed at New York. He had learned the trade of harness maker in his native country, and after locating in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he worked at that occupation one year, after which he opened a shop of his own on Grove street, but in a little over a year moved to Germantown, where he remained for four or five months. Mr. Henes then went to Osborne township, in Outagamie county and opened the first saloon in this section, but after one year disposed of it and bought forty acres of timber land in Seymour township, but after one and one-half years sold this to open the first harness shop in Seymour. Mr. Henes followed his trade in Seymour for eight or ten years and then purchased the old Columbia House, which he conducted for six years, and he was later proprietor of the Seymour Hotel, and it was while conducting this hostelry that he bought several choice properties in Seymour township, among which was his present farm of 144 acres on section 34, to which he moved about twelve years ago. Mr. Henes, who is still a strong, well-preserved man, is actively engaged in farming and stockraising, and his property is one of the most valuable in his section of the township, being equipped with a. modern residence and substantial barn and outbuildings. He is a stanch advocate of the principles of the democratic party and he has served as supervisor for eight years, justice of the peace for four years and clerk of the school board for six years. He organized the first brass band in the city of Seymour, and up to five years ago played an instrument in it himself.

Mr. Henes was married in Milwaukee to Miss Dorothea Schaumberg, daughter of John Klouse and Elizabeth (Janghaus) Schaumberg, who came to the United States from Germany in 1848 and in 1866 located in Seymour township on eighty acres of wild land. Mr. Schaumberg first erected. a log house and log barn, which were later replaced by a fine modern house and stable, and on this property Mrs. Schaumberg died in 1887, aged ninety-six years and her husband in 1900, when eighty-three years of age. Their first two children, Catherine, who is now deceased, and Dorothea, the wife of Mr. Henes, were born in Germany, while the others were born in this country, namely: Elizabeth, George, Frederick, Helena, Wilhelmina and Caroline. Mr. and Mrs. Henes have been the parents of nine children: Elizabeth, born January 24, 1869, who is single; Anna Maria, born May 24, 1871, who married a Mr. Huettle; John George, born April 3, 1873, who married Mary Roeser, residing in Menominee, Michigan; Rupert, born November 5, 1875, who married Bertha Rauhn, residing in Wisconsin; J. Anton, born January 8, 1879, who married Clara Strohm, residing in Wabeno, Wisconsin; Louis Michael, born August 8, 1882, who married Anna Beyer, also living at Wabeno; and Maxmillian, born February 11, 1886; Joseph, born April 11, 1888, and Eleanor, born May 5, 1891, all living at home.

ELWYN C. ALLEN, who at the time of his death in New York, February 8, 1905, was representing the Appleton Car-Mover Company, was for many years a well known business man in both Wisconsin and Michigan, and was also prominently identified with public matters. Born April 3, 1849, at Milan, Monroe county, Michigan, Mr. Allen was a son of Herman and Laura F. (Shelley) Allen, the former a farmer of Richmond, Vermont, who moved to Michigan at an early date. After securing a preliminary education in the public schools, Mr. Allen attended the Normal school at Ypsilanti, after which he read law and was admitted to the bar at Grand Rapids. He eventually entered the furniture business there, and was secretary and treasurer of the Kent Furniture Manufacturing Company for a long period. From Grand Rapids he removed to Eagle River, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in the lumber and shingle business until 1893, and during two years of his stay there served as judge of probate. He later became connected with the Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, with which he continued four or five years, and in 1895 came to Appleton, buying a half-interest in the Appleton Car-Mover Company. It was while in New York in the interests of this large concern, that Mr. Allen met his death in a railroad accident. He was a versatile business man, being able to recognize the business possibilities and opportunities in whatever line he was interested in, and he was successful in all of his ventures. Fraternally he was connected with the Masons, and he also held membership in the Commercial Travelers Association, and was a member of the Baptist Church. On January 19, 1881, Mr. Allen was united in marriage with Lillian H. Steiner, daughter of George H. Steiner and Jane Elizabeth Steiner, the former a native of Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, and the latter of Hollidaysburg, that state. Mr. Steiner was a merchant by occupation. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Allen, as follows: Margaretta B., who married William H. Bray, a resident of Little Rock, Arkansas, and has three children; and Chester H. and Dorothea, who are living with their mother.

ROBERT AMOS ZWICKER, president of the Saxony Knitting Works of Appleton, Wisconsin, one of the largest concerns of its kind in Northern Wisconsin, is one of the self-made men of Outagamie county, and has won his present prominence in the business world through the sheer force of his own industry and business ability. Mr. Zwicker was born in Saxony, Germany, November 22, 1857, and is a son of Robert and Amelia (Roeder) Zwicker, both of whom spent their lives in the Fatherland. In his native country, Mr. Zwicker learned the trades of knitting and machinist, and while engaged in the former occupation traveled in practically every country in Europe, his work winning the gold medal for his employers at Vienna, in 1873. He made probably the first sweater ever manufactured, this article then being known as a jacket. On first coming to the United States, he remained in Milwaukee for a short time, and then took up a homestead in Ashland county, where he cleared land and engaged in farming for three years, and later made fence posts and burned charcoal, as well as engaging in other lines of occupation in order to earn enough money to send for his family. A slump in the market, at a time when Mr. Zwicker was just beginning to prosper, found him with fourteen cars of fence posts and seven cords of wood on his hands that he was unable to sell, and he was forced out of business. Nothing daunted, however, he went to Sheboygan, where he remained six months, earning $1.50 per day at knitting shawls and jackets, and was enabled to send for his family in Germany and have $50 left. With this amount, in 1886, he settled in Milwaukee, where he later became superintendent for the Jonas Block Knitting Company, and in 1888 went to Cleveland, Ohio, being superintendent of the Central Knitting Company for seventeen years, when his health failed and he was compelled to go to Colorado. Later he went to Oregon, where he regained his health, residing on a farm for two years, and again went to Cleveland, where he remained until 1905, in which year he came to Appleton for the Crescent Knitting Company, which was sold in 1907. At this time, Mr. Zwicker decided to enter the business himself, and the Saxony Knitting Works were organized, with Robert Amos Zwicker, president; Arthur Zwicker, vice-president, and Otto H. Schultz, secretary and treasurer. The firm manufactures gloves, mittens, ladies' and gentlemen's sweater coats, shawls, fascinators, neckties and mufflers, under the well known trade-mark of "Sax-o-nit." The firm employs from forty to fifty men, and its goods find a ready sale among the large jobbing concerns, which have been handling the product since the company started with ten machines. The company was incorporated in 1910 with the same officers.

Mr. and Mrs. Zwicker were married in Germany, and ten children were born to them, of whom four are deceased, the survivors being: Emma, who married a Mr. Kemmon, of Plymouth, Wisconsin; and Arthur, Ella, Walter, Fred and Dewey.

ELIAS ALVIN TIBBETS, who has been cultivating his present farm of eighty acres in Grand Chute township for the past seven years, has been an agriculturist all of his life, and his operations have been confined to this state. He was born in Waupaca county, Wisconsin, May 28, 1861, and is a son of Jesse P. and Loretta (Sanders) Tibbetts, the former born in the state of Maine, June 5, 1824, and the latter in Ohio, May 6, 1831. When a young man Jesse P. Tibbetts left the Pine Tree State for Ohio, and later moved on to Wisconsin, locating near Oshkosh, where he found employment in a saw-mill for a short time. He later settled on a forty-acre farm near Medina, but after some years went to Waupaca county, where he was engaged in farming until his removal to Langlade county, near Antigo, and there his death occurred in 1905, after which his widow removed to Antigo, where she resides at this time. They had eight children, of whom Elias A. was the fourth in order of birth. He received his education in the schools of Clintonville and Antigo, and resided with his parents until he was twenty-two years of age, at which time he look up a homestead in Langlade county and continued to operate it until 1904. In that year he sold out and came to Outagamie county, buying the farm he now operates in Grand Chute township, a, finely improved property of eighty acres on which he is engaged in general farming. Mr. Tibbetts is a democrat in his political belief, and fraternally is connected with the Fraternal Reserve Association. On November 22, 1885, Mr. Tibbetts was married to Miss Eva Kruse, who was born in Mazomanie, Wisconsin, northwest of Madison, April 25, 1865, daughter of Conrad and Mary (Heller) Kruse, natives of Germany, where the former was born April 15, 1837, and the latter January 21, 1847. Mr. Kruse learned the miller's trade in Germany, and came to America at the age of twenty-four years, following his trade until after his marriage, when he took up the occupation of mason, alternating at the two trades during the summer and winter months. He lived in Neenah, Wisconsin, for seventeen years, and then went to Antigo, where he bought a farm, but in 1902 retired to Neenah, residing at that place until the time he located in Appleton, where his death occurred August 10, 1910, his widow still surviving him and making her home there. They had a family of eight children, of whom Mrs. Tibbetts is the oldest. Mr. and Mrs. Tibbetts have been the parents of the following children: May, born August 10, 1887, who died at the age of six years; Clarence, born June 27, 1890; Helen Ida, born October 25, 1896; and Cecil, born April 8, 1900.

JOHN B. RUSSELL, an enterprising business man of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is engaged in the manufacture of tailor made shirts, and also carries on jobbing in underwear, ties and hosiery, was born in November, 1876, in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Charles and Sarah (Wilder) Russell, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of Massachusetts. Mr. Russell's parents came from New England to Wisconsin in 1866, and settled in Appleton, where Charles Russell was engaged in the hardware business until his death in 1877. His widow still survives and makes her home in this city. Three children were born to Charles and Sarah Russell, namely: H. W., who is engaged in the wholesale dry goods business in Appleton; Lottie, who is deceased, and John B. John B. Russell received his education in the public schools, and his first employment was as a clerk for 0. E. Brooks, in whose employ he continued for six months. He then entered the shirt manufacturing business, in 1886, and from that time until 1893 was engaged in business alone. In 1893 he formed a partnership with his brother, H. W. Russell, this association continuing until December, 1904, when John B. sold his interests and engaged in his present business, the manufacture of tailor made shirts, and jobbing in underwear, neckties and hosiery. His factory is now located at No. 619 Morrison street, and he has built up a business that amounts to $5,000 annually. In 1903 Mr. Russell was united in marriage with Henrietta Bouton, of Michigan, daughter of Norman C. Bouton, and she died in 1906, leaving one daughter, Lottie Jeanette. In 1907, Mr. Russell was married (second) to Mrs. Alice Wadsworth, of Milwaukee, who had three children by her first marriage, namely: Bessie, Marguerite and Benjamin. Mr. and Mrs. Russell are members of the Christian Scientist church. In politics he is a republican.

CHARLES JULIUS, a prosperous farmer of Greenville township, Outagamie county, where he is well known and highly respected as an honest, upright citizen, is a member of one of the early pioneer families of this section, his parents, Fred and Louisa (Dahoe) Julius, natives of Germany, having come to Greenville township in 1854 and purchased a farm of eighty acres, for which they paid $200. About twenty years later, Fred Julius sold this property, buying a tract of 120 acres in the southern part of the township, where his death occurred about 1890 or 1891, his widow following him to the grave several years later. They had three children: Fred, retired, living in Oshkosh; John and Christ, Greenville township farmers; Charles; Louisa, who married John Staudt of Neenah; William, who died in Vancouver, and Henry, a factory employe of Neenah. Charles Julius was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, February 6, 1853, and his education was secured in the district schools of Greenville township, which he attended when he could spare time from his duties on the home farm. He was married November 10, 1879, to Miss Caroline Westphal, who was born in Clayton township, Outagamie county, January 12, 1859, daughter of August and Mary (Schultz) Julius, the former born in Kreisen, Germany, November 7, 1826, and the latter in Mecklenburg, March 30, 1835. They came to the United States about 1850, and Mr. Westphal worked for about seven years in New York before coming to Clayton township, and from that time until his retirement in 1893, he was engaged in farming. His wife died in 1909, and he now lives in Appleton. After his marriage, Mr. Julius bought forty acres of land in Greenville township, to which he has added from time to time, and he now has 100 acres, all in a state of cultivation. Mr. Julius has been a lifelong resident of his section of the county and has always done everything in his power to encourage and promote the advancement and improvement of its interests. He is a democrat in politics, but has not found time to engage actively in public matters; his religious belief is that of the Lutheran church. To Mr. and Mrs. Julius there have been born three children: Helena, born May 14, 1880, married Wallace Haas and died six months after marriage; Celia, born July 26, 1881, married John Heinel, a butcher of Greenville township, and Ervin, born June 27, 1892, residing at home with his parents.

WILLIAM WUNDERLICH, whose fine farm of 160 acres is situated in Center township, is one of the progressive agriculturists of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and is a native of Ellington, this county, and a son of Christian Wunderlich. Christian Wunderlich was born in Bavaria, Germany, and as a young man came to the United States, settling at Greenville, Wisconsin, where he resided until about 1852, and in that year located in Ellington township, Outagamie county. Purchasing land, he commenced to cultivate it and engage in farming, and added to his property from time to time, becoming one of' the influential farmers of his day, and a man held in the highest esteem by his fellow citizens, who elected him to various positions of' honor and trust. He is still living, his home being in Appleton, where he moved after his retirement from business activities, and is in good health and enjoying the fruits of the years of his early labor. Christian Wunderlich was united in marriage with Dora Berg, who was born in Germany and came to this country with her parents, and she also survives and is hale and hearty despite advancing years. They had a family of eight children.

William Wunderlich was born on his father's farm, April 19, 1877, and his schooling was secured in the district schools near his home and Northwestern University, from which he was graduated at the age of twenty-two years. He then returned to his father's farm, on which he worked until 1904, and in that year purchased the property which he now owns, an excellent tract of 160 acres of farming land, on which he has made many improvements. General farming and stock raising have demanded all of his time and attention, and he has never allowed his name to be used as candidate for political preferment. With his family, he is a member of the Lutheran church at Ellington. On September 13, 1904, Mr. Wunderlich was united in marriage with Miss Caroline Riehl, daughter of Christian and Theresa (Fries) Riehl, of Center township, and three children have been born to this union: Myrtle, born August 21, 1906; Waldo, born February 10, 1909; and Ethel, born January 12, 1910.

LEO AUGUST HEGNER has been a resident of Grand Chute township all of his life, and is now engaged in agricultural pursuits on the farm on which he was born August 30, 1884. He is a son of John and Matilda (Tesch) Hegner, the former of whom was born in Saxony, September 1, 1839, and the latter in Pomerania, Germany, May 21, 1844. John Hegner came to America in the early '50s and first settled at Milwaukee, shortly thereafter renting land in Milwaukee county, on which he resided for three years, at which time he came to Outagamie county and bought the farm on which his son Leo A. now lives. This land was situated in the woods, and had no improvements of any kind made upon it, but he settled down, built himself a little home, and started in to clear up the property, and after many years of labor, in the spring of 1909, he turned over to his son a well-cultivated, fertile tract and retired to his home on the corner of Drew and Atlantic streets, Appleton. This handsome residence was built from attic to cellar by his son, Leo A., who even completed the inside work, plastering and painting. Of the thirteen children of John and Matilda Hegner, seven are now living, namely: Clara, who is the wife of Fred Miller, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Lizzie, the wife of Herman Vakes, a butcher of Appleton; Henry, who is a member of the Appleton marble works firm of Hegner & Wolf; Tillie, who married George Minster, an Appleton butcher; John, who is engaged in contracting in Appleton; Sarah, who is single and resides with her parents, and Leo August.

Leo August Hegner attended district school No. 9, in Grand Chute township, and the German school at Appleton, and when he was but seventeen years of age he commenced to work for others when he was not needed on the home farm. When he was eighteen years old he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed during four winters in Appleton, and was also engaged in house painting. After his father's retirement he settled on the old home farm, which he is now cultivating with marked success, and the large crops which he raises denote the skilled agrculturist no less than the well-kept, substantial appearance of the buildings and equipment indicate the expert mechanic. Mr. Hegner was married November 25, 1908, to Anna Kack, who was born in Maine township, Outagamie county, March 30, 1887, daughter of William and Mary (Grunde) Kack, the former of whom was born in Germany October 15, 1848, and the latter January 19, 1850. The parents of Mrs. Hegner came to the United States in 1881, and after spending a short time in New York removed to the West, and finally settled in Ellington township, Outagamie county, where Mr. Kack cultivated a farm for about one year. He then went to Appleton, where he was employed in a brick yard for a year, at the end of which time he bought a farm in Maine township, on which he was located for nineteen years. Selling out, he went to Appleton and engaged in a retail liquor business for about five years, and he is now carrying on the same business in Forest county. Mrs. Kack also survives. They had a family of thirteen children, of whom nine survive: Tracy, who married Earl Keesler, a farmer of Shiocton; Otto, a lumberman of Lakewood; Mary, who married Ed Runge, a carpenter of Appleton; William, a lumberman of Lakewood; Herman, a farmer on the old homestead; Anna, who married Mr. Hegner, and Albert, Letitia and Louis, who are single and reside at home. Mr. and Mrs. Hegner have had one child, Viola Hattie, born October 17, 1909. Mr. Hegner and his wife are members of the Lutheran church. In political matters he is independent.

THEODORE FREDERICK STARK, who has been engaged in business in Appleton for nearly a quarter of a century, is now the proprietor of an agricultural implement store in this city, where he is well known as a public-spirited citizen and first-class business man. Mr. Stark was born at Horicon, Wisconsin, October 11, 1857, and is a son of Fred and Louisa Stark, both of whom are now deceased. Mr. Stark's parents were natives of Wriezen, Germany, from whence they came to the United States in 1855, landing at New York, from whence they came to Theresa, Wisconsin. Later they went to Hustisford, and in 1863 to Horicon, from whence the family finally moved to Appleton in 1871, and there the parents spent the remainder of their lives. Mr. Stark was a miller by trade, but during middle life learned the trade of cooper which he followed during the remainder of the years of his activity. He was an invalid during the last thirteen years of his life. Two children were born to him and his wife; Theodore F. and Mrs. Anna Hodtwalker, the latter residing near Lincoln, Nebraska. Theodore F. Stark secured a public school education, and as a young man learned the trade of cooper, which he followed until 1881, and in that year went to work for D. B. Bailey as a clerk in the grocery and hardware business. In 1888 he embarked in the grocery business on his own account, continuing therein until 1892 when he sold his interests to Harry Rademacher & Son, and entered the hardware business. In 1895 he admitted William Tesch as a partner, but in 1900, on account of failing health, Mr. Stark sold out his interests and purchased the implement business of Frank Wright, which he still continues to conduct. He carries a full line of modern farming machinery and utensils, including the International Harvester Company's goods and those of other leading manufacturers. On June 30, 1889, Mr. Stark was married to Julia Huetter, of Appleton, daughter of Mrs. Huetter who moved from Green Bay to Appleton in 1883. Mrs. Stark died in 1884, leaving one son, Louis T. F., of Colorado, assistant cashier of the Louisville Bank. Mr. Stark was married (second) to Annie Stevens, of Appleton, daughter of John and Mary Stevens, and they have had one daughter, Josie, living at home. Mr. and Mrs. Stark are members of Zion Lutheran Church. In his political belief he is a Republican.

AROS ELIAS ADSIT, D. D. S., who belongs to one of Appleton's well known families, has been engaged in a dental practice in this city since 1899 and has built up a large practice. Dr. Adsit is a native of Appleton, born in 1872, a son of Frank and Frances (Hammond) Adsit, he is a native of New York and she of Canada, who came to Appleton shortly after the Civil War, in which Frank Adsit fought as a member of a New York regiment. After coming to Appleton he was engaged in a mercantile business up to the time of his death, and was also a well-known Woodman. He and his wife had five children: Maude, who died in infancy; Frank, who also died when young; Emma, who met her death in a coasting accident in childhood; a child which died in infancy; and Amos Eilas, who is the only survivor. He attended the public schools and Ryan High school in Appleton, and after leaving the latter institution entered the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, from which he was graduated in 1899, with the degree of D. D. S. He immediately returned to his native city, where he has been engaged in a lucrative practice to the present time. Dr. Adsit is a member of the Elks, the Eagles and the Equitable Fraternal Union, and with Mrs. Adsit attends the Congregational Church. In 1900 he was married to Laura Lebberman, of Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and they have had a family of two children: Misses Bernice and Dorothy. Dr. Adsit has gained an enviable reputation in his profession in Appleton, and is also well known in social and fraternal circles.

ALOIS BECKER, a prosperous young stock raiser and well known citizen of Greenville township, Outagamie county, is a native of this township, where he was born May 2, 1880, a son of Anton and Francisco (Kraus) Becker, natives of Bohemia, Austria-Hungary, and early settlers of this section. Anton Becker came to the United States with his parents about 1845, when twelve years old, and became a land owner in Greenville township. He was also engaged in carpenter work and teaming in Appleton, but eventually engaged in the saloon and hotel business at Greenville Station for twelve years, where he also held the office of postmaster for a like period. He is now living retired in Appleton. He is a veteran of the Civil War, in which he served as a member of a Wisconsin regiment, but he was never wounded nor did he have any hospital service. Mr. Becker and his wife had thirteen children, of whom seven are now deceased, and Alois was the seventh in order of birth. The family is connected with the Roman Catholic Church at Greenville, and the politics of father and son have been democratic, the son serving as school clerk for some time. Alois Becker received a common school education in Greenville township, and resided with his parents until his marriage, after which he rented a farm for two years in this township. He then purchased his present fine 137-acre property, which he has devoted to stock raising, specializing in Guernsey cattle, and continually grading up for his own use. He also does his own churning and finds a ready market for his product in Appleton. Mr. Becker is a member of the Guernsey Breeders' Association. He is industrious and systematic, and a leader in all movements tending to benefit his township and the community at large. He holds membership in the Catholic Knights. On August ll, 1903, Mr. Becker was married to Miss Clara Smith, who was born in Greenville township, Outagamie county, August 3, 1880, daughter of Nicholas and Anna (Straup) Smith, the former born in Ellington township and the latter in Greenville township, both of German parents. Mr. Smith, who has always been a farmer, is now living on his property in Greenville township, and his wife also survives. They have had fourteen children, Mrs. Becker being the second oldest thereof. Mr. and Mrs. Becker have had no children, but have an adopted child from the Orphan Asylum, Ida, born August 16, 1910.

ANDREW H. STARK, who is carrying on agricultural operations on a fine tract of 110 acres, situated in Grand Chute township, is a native of Saxony, Germany, where he was born July 1, 1850, a son of Balthaser and Margaret (Faulk) Stark, natives of Saxony. They came to the United States about 1852, locating in Milwaukee, where Mr. Stark worked at whatever occupation he could find until he had accumulated enough to invest in a ten-acre farm located near Milwaukee. He continued to operate there until 1862, and in that year sold out and came to Outagamie county, buying a farm in Grand Chute township, on which there were no improvements. He cleared his farm and put it in a fine state of cultivation and continued to live upon it until 1885, when he sold it to his son, Andrew H., and removed to Shawano county, purchasing a property there. After some years he gave this farm to another son, with whom he lived during the balance of his life, his death occurring in 1896. His wife had passed away in 1858, having been the mother of five children, namely: Faldina, who is operating the homestead in Shawano county; Andrew H.; Henry, a resident of Michigan; Christopher, who is deceased; and Lizzie, the wife of Luther Glass of Shawano county. Andrew H. Stark attended the schools of Brookfield township, Waukesha county, and Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, and was reared to the life of an agriculturist. He was married when he was not quite twenty years of age, and after this event purchased the farm from his father. He has the 110 acres in the best of condition, the land being highly cultivated and capable of raising large crops, and in addition to general farming he has carried on some dairying and stock raising. Mr. Stark is interested as a stockholder in the Indiana Oil Company. From the time when he was fifteen years old and followed the river, being engaged in logging and other occupations, Mr. Stark has been a hard working, progressive man, and the success which he has achieved has come to him only after years of persistent and well directed effort. In his political belief Mr. Stark is a democrat, and he has served as township treasurer for fourteen years and as chairman by appointment to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Chairman Keenan. His religious belief is that of the Lutheran Church.

On January 13, 1870, Mr. Stark was married,to Matilda Tesch, who was born in Prussia, Germany, March 9, 1849, daughter of Christopher and Mena (Disher) Tesch, who came to America in 1862 and located near Milwaukee on a farm. Some years later they removed to the city of Appleton, and there the father died in 1885 and the mother in 1901. Mr. and Mrs. Stark had a family of fourteen children: John, born October 25, 1870, who married (first) Margaret Daily, and (second) Ella Hintz, living in Appleton, where he is foreman of the car barns; Louisa, born December 29, 1872, is the wife of Emil Strack, a Sheboygan county farmer; Frank, born January 13, 1875, married Gussie Sennerow, a resident of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin; Mary, born January 2, 1877, is the wife of Julius Witt, a farmer of Spencer Road, Grand Chute township; Emma; born December 3, 1878, married Charles Rogers, a resident of Maine township; Minnie, born August 22, 1880, is the wife of William Naumann, a resident of Green Bay, Wisconsin; William, born May 22, 1882, is a farmer of Black Creek township; Robert, born June 18, 1884, died April 24, 1892; Rosa, born December 9, 1885, is the wife of Henry Sager, a resident of Appleton; Albert, born April 29, 1887, is single and resides at home; Elma, born March 3, 1889; Arthur, born July 8, 1891; George, born, May 29, 1893; and Matilda, born March 7, 1895.

THOMAS B. LITTLE, a farmer and stock raiser of Seymour township, who is carrying on operations on section 27, was born in Western Canada, February 27, 1853, a son of Thomas and Rebecca (Biefield) Little. Thomas Little was born in Ireland, from whence he came to America and located in Canada, where he was engaged in agricultural pursuits. He brought his family to Black Creek township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, in the early days when the town site was a vast, tangled brush, and located on 240 acres of land, on which, however, he remained but a short time, moving to an eighty-acre tract in Grand Chute township. He remained at this place for four years, and then spent a few months in Central Iowa, but returned to Wisconsin and located on a farm in Winnebago county, eventually returning to Black Creek township, where for one year he operated an eighty-acre farm near the village. He then went to another farm of eighty acres nearby, but after four or five years sold out and took up a quarter section in another part of Black Creek township, on which he carried on operations for seven or eight years, then settling on a ten-acre tract near the village, where he continued to farm for five years. Finally he moved into the village, and there he spent the remaining years of his life, his death occurring in 1906, when he was eighty-seven years old. His first wife had died thirty-five years previous to this time and he had married again, but all of his children were by the first union, and were as follows: John, Thomas B., William, Robert and Moses, born in Canada, and Richard, Albert, Margaret and Rebecca, born in the United States.

Thomas B. Little received his early education in the schools of Canada and remained at home with his parents until he had reached the age of twenty-four years, when he began farming on a tract of forty acres in Clayton township. After four or five years he moved to Black Creek township, Outagamie county, where he farmed for three or four years on an eighty-acre farm, and at the end of that time sold out and moved to a rented farm, but eventually bought back his Black Creek property, which he operated for five years and then sold. One year later Mr. Little purchased the farm which he is now operating, a well-watered, highly-cultivated tract on section 24, in Seymour township, where he has erected good buildings and made many improvements. Mr. Little carries on general farming and also raises graded stock, and his operations have been uniformly successful. He has devoted all of his time and attention to his farming duties, and has never aspired to public office.

In 1884, Mr. Little was united in marriage with Lillian Huse, who was born in Black Creek, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, in 1863, daughter of George and Elizabeth (Barnum) Huse, old settlers of Black Creek township, and to this union there have been born six children, namely: Howard, Myrl, Rosalind, Eva, Velma and Julia, who died at the age of nine months.

ANTON LIPPERT, who throughout his entire life has been identified with the agricultural interests of Greenville township, Outagamie county, is now operating the old Lippert homestead, located on Hortonville Rural Route No. 22, on which he was born June 14, 1860, a, son of George and Frances (Sunderleiter) Lippert, natives of Germany. They came to the United States in 1854, first settling in Center township on a farm, and after a few years removing to Greenville township, where they spent the remainder of their lives on the farm now owned by their son Anton. Their seven children are all living, and of these Anton was the fifth in order of birth. He obtained a district school education in Greenville township, and has never left the old home farm. He came into possession of the property when he was thirty years of age, and is now carrying on general farming and stock raising on forty-five acres of highly cultivated property. Mr. Lippert is a democrat in politics, but has never actively engaged in public matters, although he takes a lively interest in any movement which is of benefit to his community and any such movement can always count upon his earnest support With Mrs. Lippert, he is a faithful member of the Roman Catholic Church. On May 6, 1890, Mr. Lippert was married to. Miss Amelia Gehring, who was born in Grand Chute township, October 15, 1870, daughter of Paul and Margaret (Segert) Gehring, natives of Germany. Mr. Gehring was some years the senior of his wife, who was born August 28, 1832, and he died when Mrs. Lippert was but nine months old, having been a teacher in Germany, and a farmer in Grand Chute township. Mrs. Gehring was married again, and is now the wife of John Shank of Appleton. She and Mr. Gehring had a family of eight children, Mrs. Lippert being the youngest. There have been two children born to her marriage with Mr. Shank. Mr. and Mrs. Lippert have had seven children, as follows: Margaret, born March 2, 1891; Joseph, born May 6, 1892, who died January 17, 1893; Olivia, born November 30, 1893, who died July 27, 1894; George, born January 17, 1895; Herbert, born May 29, 1899; Loretta, born September 10, 1903; and Viola, born August 22, 1908.

BERNARD JOHN SCHMIDT, an enterprising young farmer of Greenville township, operating his own farm of eighty acres, the old Schmidt homestead, and forty-seven acres of rented land in the same section, was born on the former farm, May 12, 1888, and is a son of John and Fannie (Ebert) Schmidt, farming people of this township, who are now living retired in Appleton, in their home on Prospect avenue, whence they moved in 1910. They are natives of Ellington township, Outagamie county, and are the parents of four children: Theresa, the wife of Edward Smith, a farmer of Greenville township; Bernard John; Alice, single, and a clerk in a furniture store in Appleton; and Matilda, also single, residing with her parents. Bernard John Schmidt attended school in Ellington township, after leaving which he began to assist his father in the work of the homestead farm, which he bought at the age of twenty-two years. This tract of eighty acres is probably one of the best equipped as to buildings of any of its size in Greenville township, and the soil is fertile and the land well fenced. In addition, Mr. Schmidt does some dairying and raises a few cattle for his own use, and he is looked upon as one of the most progressive of the younger farmers in this section. He is a Roman Catholic in his religious belief, and politically votes with the democratic party. On April 20, 1910, Mr. Schmidt was united in marriage with Miss Cecelia Smith, who was born in Greenville township, November 6, 1887, the estimable daughter of Nicholas and -------------------- (----------------) Smith, farming people of Greenville township, who are still engaged in activities here. One child has blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt: Marvin, who was born April 20, 1911.

WILLIAM B. YOUNG, who after many years of traveling while following his trade is now settled down to a quiet retired life in the village of Hortonville, is a native of St. Lawrence county, New York, where he was born May 27, 1846, a son of Thomas F. Young. Thomas F. Young was born in Montpelier, Virginia, whence his father and two brothers settled in 1770, coming thence from England. Thomas F. Young died in 1864, and his widow still survives at the age of eighty-seven years and lives in Outagamie county. William B. Young was the oldest of seven children, and as a young man tried to enlist in the Union army for service in the Civil War on several occasions, but on account of being a minor his father would not allow him to go. Eventually, however, he succeeded in being accepted in the 100-day service in the 140th Regiment, Illinois Volunteer Infantry, which did garrison duty along the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, and in the fall of 1864 he was mustered out at Chicago. He then returned to New York State and in March, 1865, left for Massachusetts to learn the machinist's trade, being first employed by the Arms Manufacturing Company and later with the Wheeler & Wilson Company at Bridgeport, Connecticut, with which concern he remained ten years. In 1881 he came West to Elgin, Illinois, and worked for the Elgin National Watch Company, making watch factory machinery, and after seven years went to the Aurora Watch Company and from there to Canton, Ohio, working for the Dunbar-Hampton Watch Company. He was next employed by the Columbus Watch Company at Columbus, Ohio, and the National Cash Register Company at Dayton, Ohio. While in Elgin, Mr. Young had invested in a Elgin Building, Loan and Homestead contract, and this matured while he was in Dayton, and with the other savings, of a long and fruitful career he came to Hortonville, August 3, 1893, and has resided here ever since. On February 1, 1870, Mr. Young married Mary J. Grinals, daughter of Jacob Grinals of Fall River, Massachusetts. Mr. Young, who has voted in five states, was a republican until Blaine's nomination, when he turned democrat on the tariff question and has voted with the latter party ever since. He was reared in the faith of the Methodist Church, but for the past thirty-five years has been an agnostic.

HERMAN HECKERT, SR., an old and honored resident of Appleton, Wisconsin, and a veteran of the great Civil War, who has been identified with the business interests of this city for more than forty-three years, is now the proprietor of a large shoe business. He is a native of the Fatherland, born in 1845, son of Michael and Anna Sophia (Brot) Heckert, who came to the United States in 1855 on the sailing vessel "Oder." Landing at New York City, the family made its way to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and traveled thence by ox team to Mayview, Dodge county, in the vicinity of which place Michael Heckert was engaged in farming until his death. He was one of the pioneer agriculturists of this section, and bore with others all of the hardships and privations incidental to the pioneer's life, working hard during his active years that he might make a home for his family and a competency for his old age. He and his wife had five children; Herman; Charles, who enlisted in 1862 in the artillery, and after his honorable discharge at Fort Monroe re-enlisted in the infantry service, and who is now deceased; August, who is a resident of North Dakota; Fredericka, who is deceased; and Mary, who married Edward Monyer of Denver, Colorado. Herman Heckert was reared on the home farm and received his education in the district schools of the vicinity of the homestead. During his youth he remembers seeing Lincoln and Carl Schurz when they were on their stump-speaking trips. On October 4, 1864, he enlisted in a regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers, being in General Thomas' division, and participated with this regiment until the close of the war, participating in a number of hard-fought engagements, among which was the battle of Nashville. On his return from the war, Mr. Heckert went to Mayville for one year, and spent a like period at Fox Lake, and in April, 1868, located in Appleton and established himself in the liquor business with another gentleman for two years. Later he engaged in business on his own account, but was burned out in the destructive fire, and in 1872 erected a building and again engaged in business, continuing in that line for fifteen years. He sold out in 1888 and opened a shoe establishment, erecting a building and later adding another story, and it is now 100x20 feet. He has continued to carry on this business to the present time and has met with well-merited success.

In early life Mr. Heckert was married to Carnestina Fischer, born in Germany, daughter of Frederick and Amelia (Foster) Fischer, who came to Outagamie county about 1853, Mr. Fischer being a well-known contractor and builder. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Heckert, namely: Annie, who is deceased; Augusta; Herman, who assists his father in the shoe business; Amanda, who married Jacob Fife, a resident of Appleton; Clara, who lives at home; Robert, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Sadie, a resident of Denver, who is studying to become a nurse; and Emil, who lives in Denver. Mr. Heckert erected a beautiful home in Appleton in 1892. He is well known in the city, and is a popular member of the Odd Fellows, the Masons and the Grand Army of the Republic.

W. J. FOOTE, D.D.S., a successful young dental practitioner of Appleton, Wisconsin, and a member of a family that has been identified with this state since 1849, was born at Hartford, Wisconsin, July 6, 1882, and is a son of John D. and Margaret (O'Connell) Foote. Thomas Foote, the grandfather of Dr. W. J., brought his family from Boston, Massachusetts, to Wisconsin in 1849, and the rest of his life was spent in farming and real estate dealing, he becoming one of the well-known figures of his day in this section. His son, John D., who was born in Massachusetts, accompanied the family to Wisconsin, and here engaged in agricultural pursuits, in which he has continued to the present time. He and his wife, who is a native of this state, had a family of two sons and four daughters, of whom W. J. is the eldest. Dr. Foote attended the public and high schools at Hartford, after leaving which he entered the dental department of the Marquette University, at Milwaukee, from which he was graduated in 1909, at which time he established himself in practice in Appleton, where he has since continued. He has a well-appointed suite of offices, fitted with the latest inventions of his profession, and is already taking care of a large number of patients. He holds membership in the Appleton and Fox River Valley Dental Associations, and is also connected with the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Fraternal Reserve Association. On August 9, 1910, Dr. Foote was married to Miss Nellie Frawley, of Calumet county, Wisconsin. They are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church, and are well known in Appleton's social circles.

FREDERICK C. WARNING, operating a general dairy farm of 130 acres in Greenville township, is one of the progressive and enterprising young agriculturists of this section. He was born at Hortonville, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, October 24, 1884, and is a son of Christian and Minnie (Bohnsack) Warning. Christian Warning was born in Germany, February 5, 1855, and his wife December 1, 1863, and they came to the United States in 1883, locating at Hortonville, and later removing to Bovina township, from whence they subsequently returned to Hortonville. For a time Mr. Warning worked for others, but eventually he secured land in Greenville township, and here he and his wife still reside. Frederick C. Warning was the oldest of a family of six children, and after receiving his education in the schools of Hortonville and Greenville township, he learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed for one season before his marriage. He then rented a farm near Hortonville for three years, after which he bought his present 130-acre property, which he conducts as a general dairy farm. He has been successful in his operations and his property is now one of the handsome farms of this section. On April 15, 1907, Mr. Warning was married to Barbara Paehlmann, who was born at Lebanon, Waupaca county, August 25, 1887, daughter of Nicholas and Margaret (Steinel) Paehlmann, natives of Germany, where Mr. Paehlmann was born September 24, 1843, and his wife July 8, 1852. They came to this country about 1878, locating at Lebanon on a farm, on which Mr. Paehlmann died June 30, 1909. His widow still resides on the homestead. Of their four children, Mrs. Warning is the youngest. Mr. and Mrs. Warning have had one son: Emil, born September 18, 1909. They are consistent members of the Lutheran Church, and in political matters Mr. Warning is a republican.

ROBERT I. COLE, D.D.S., who during the past ten years has been engaged in a large dental practice at Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in Joliet, Illinois, in 1877, a son of Dr. G. W. and Robena (Robertson) Cole. Dr. G. W. Cole was a native of England, and at the age of nineteen years came to the United States, studying dentistry, which he later practiced at Joliet and Chicago. He is now living retired in the latter city. He was married in Joliet to Robena Robertson, a native of New York state, and they had two children: Dr. Robert I., and George Bryan, the latter of whom died at the age of eleven years. Dr. Robert I. Cole received his early education at Joliet, and later attended school at Decatur and Chicago, Illinois, graduating from high school in the latter city. He studied dentistry under the preceptorship of his father, and during 1898 graduated from the dental department of Northwestern University, Evanston. He engaged in a general practice in Chicago at that time, continuing there until 1901, when he located in Appleton, and here he has continued to the present time, having built up a large practice. In 1901, Dr. Cole was married to Mary Kober, the estimable daughter of Jacob and Mary (Speilbower) Kober. Dr. Cole is prominent in the Loyal Order of the Moose, the Fraternal Reserve Union and the Appleton Dental Association, and with his wife is a devout member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church. He votes independently in local matters but in national affairs is inclined towards republican principles. He is highly regarded among the city's professional men, and he has a wide circle of warm personal friends in Appleton.

BENNO LIEBHABER, one of the progressive agriculturalists of Seymour township, who is operating his 160-acre farm in section 21 along scientific lines, has developed his present fine property from wild land. He is a native of Germany, where he was born June 15, 1845, a son of Winegan and Anna Liebhaber, natives of that country where they spent their lives. Mr. Liebhaber's only brother, August, never came to the United States. In 1868, Benno Liebhaber left the Fatherland, and coming to America, settled in Appleton, Wisconsin, where he worked for sixteen years. During the eight following years, Mr. Liebhaber rented a farm near Appleton, and he then came to Seymour township, trading property in Appleton for eighty acres of wild land here, on which he built a shanty and this was his home until some time later when he erected a log house and barn. He began clearing the land from the brush and timber, and after putting his first tract under cultivation, he purchased a second eighty acres, and erected a set of fine modern buildings. Mr. Leibhaber now has the entire 160 acres in a productive condition, and he raises large crops and breeds thoroughbred cattle. He has always been progressive in his ideas, and he uses the most modern methods in working his property. In political matters he favors the principles of the democratic party, but he is more liable to vote for the man than the organization.

Mr. Liebhaber's first marriage was to Anna Lawrence, who died leaving him four children, namely: Frank, Anna, Mary and Joe. He was married (second) to Mrs. Anna (Cankle) Ebert, who was born in Germany, April 24, 1833, daughter of Joseph and Anna Cankle. Charles Ebert, the first husband of Mrs. Liebhaber, died in 1873 at the age of forty-one. They had a family of three children: Joseph, Anton and Charles.

D. J. BOYLE, proprietor of the Appleton Electric Laundry, and one of the well known and highly esteemed business men of that city, has been before the public in various capacities as a city official and since 1900 has served as secretary of the Fire and Police Board. Born September 12, 1865, in the state of Pennsylvania, Mr. Boyle is a son of Bernard F. and Mary Boyle, who removed to Iowa from Pennsylvania in 1886, and there the father died in 1895 while his widow still survives and makes her home at Atlantic, Iowa. They had four boys and two girls. D. J. Boyle received his early education in New York, where his father was employed as superintendent of government works at Hell Gate, under General John Newton, chief of the government engineers. Hell Gate was formerly a dangerous pass in the East River, New York, where rocks used to form an obstruction much feared by mariners, but by extensive submarine operations and the use of the most powerful explosives the passage was cleared; at this time this was looked upon as the greatest engineering feat ever attempted. After completing his education, B. J. Boyle started to work for the Collier Publishing Company, and for twelve years was employed as collector by this concern. He came to Appleton in 1888, and in 1897 opened the Appleton Electric Laundry, with Stephen McCarty as a partner. In 1901 he purchased Mr. McCarty's interests, and since that time he has carried on the business alone. Mr. Boyle employs five girls and three men, and operates a wagon, and the establishment is up-to-date in every respect. Since 1900 Mr. Boyle has been secretary of the Fire and Police Board, and he is religiously connected with St. Mary's Catholic Church. His fraternal associations are with the Knights of Columbus and the Elks, in both of which orders he is very popular. In 1898, Mr. Boyle was married to Miss Fannie M. Crouch, of Appleton, and there have been two children born to this union, namely: Mary and Catherine.

JONATHAN WAITE, one of Hortonia township's leading agriculturists, who has one of the best eighty-acre farms to be found in this section, was born October 10, 1845, in the town of Dayton, Cattaraugus county, New York, a son of Martin and Lavina (Adams)Waite. Martin Waite was born in Washington county, New York, in 1809, a son of Isaac, who had been a resident of New York state for many years, the family originally having come from England. In 1856 Martin Waite came to Wisconsin, settling in Hortonville, where the family resided for two years. He was married in New York to Lavina Adams, born March 11, 1816, in Onondaga county, that state, and she died in 1850, Mr. Waite surviving her until March, 1896. Jonathan Waite, who was one of ten children born to his parents, received a part of his education in New York and finished it in Hortonville. When fifteen years of age he left home and went to work on the farms of neighboring agriculturists, and at the age of twenty-one years had salved $500 and was also the possessor of a deed to eighty acres of land, on which he moved. But little clearing had been done on this property, but he set to work and cleared and cultivated it, and now has one of the finest farms to be found in this part of the county. He carries on general farming and dairy work, and the success that he has attained is ample proof of his ability as an agriculturist. In 1873 Mr. Waite was married to Ella Jones, who was born in Hortonville, March 16, 1846, daughter of William and Martha (Leitch) Jones, and they have had twelve children: William, who was drowned in the river when twenty years of age; Duane, who died in infancy; Rosa,. who married George Moder; Nettie, the wife of Vernon McGreen; Mary, who married Frank Bowe; Vina, who married William Steinke; Irvin, at home; Bertha, who married Otto Schwartzkopf; Reyna, who is teaching district school in Dale township; and John, Martha and Marvin, who are living at home. For several years Mr. Waite was on the town board and served as town treasurer for one year. He has always been a great advocate of education, and for a period covering twenty-two years was school clerk of Hortonia township.

LOUIS C. KNAACK, a prosperous farmer and stock raiser and representative citizen of Greenville township, owning an excellent property on the Appleton and Hortonville road, was born in Ellington township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, February 26, 1881, a son of Frederick and Sophia (Lueth) Knaack. Frederick Knaack was born in Germany, September 9, 1839, and his wife September 29, 1844, and they were married in the Fatherland, from whence they came to the United States about 1869, settling in Ellington township. About two years after locating here, Frederick Knaack purchased a farm, but after living there only several years, removed to Greenville township, leaving his son in charge of the original homestead. After six years spent in Greenville township, Mr. Knaack returned to the Ellington township farm, and there continued to reside, his death occurring in September, 1905. His widow now resides with her daughter, Mrs. Peters, who lives on the farm adjoining that of Louis C. Knaack. Three children were born to Frederick and Sophia Knaack, namely: Frederick, residing in Shawano county; Mary, who married Frank Peters; and Louis C. Louis C. Knaack attended the district schools of Ellington township, and at the age of eighteen years rented a part of the Ellington homestead, on which he remained for six years. He then moved to Appleton, where he worked for Wolf & Hagner, in their marble works for six months, and for S. C. Shannon & Company for about half a year, and he then purchased his present farm of sixty-nine acres, located on the Appleton and Hortonville road. He operates it as a dairy farm, making a specialty of Holstein cattle, and is also extensively engaged in raising hogs of the Poland-China breed for the market. He devotes all of his time and attention to his farm, and has made a success of his venture. On January 23, 1902, Mr. Knaack was married to Miss Eva Manley, who was born in Ellington township, March 10, 1883, daughter of Orson and Margery (Warner) Manley, natives of New York, where Mr. Manley was born January 13, 1851, and his wife May 7, 1851. Orson Manley came to Wisconsin with his parents in 1867, the family locating in Ellington township, where Mr. Manley grew to manhood and became a landowner and farmer. In 1906 he moved to Appleton and retired, and there his death occurred October 3, 1910. His widow, who survives him, resides at No. 963 Atlantic street, Appleton. They had four children, namely: Jay, who is deceased: Mrs. Knaack; Jessie, who is deceased, and Flossie, who was married May 9, 1911, to the Rev. George Goodrich, minister of the Methodist Episcopal church at Niagara, Wisconsin. By a former marriage, Mrs. Manley had two children, one of whom, Charles Hewitt, resides at Neenah. Wisconsin.

One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Knaack, Viola Margaret, May 10, 1905. They have also an adopted child from the Orphans' Home: Ray Frey. Mr. and Mrs. Knaack are members of the Lutheran Church. In political matters, he is a Republican.

HENRY ZEH, carrying on extensive agricultural operations in Center township, has been a lifelong resident of this section, having been born September 4, 1860, on the farm of his father, Gottlieb Zeh. The latter was a native of Germany, who left that country when twelve years old to come to the United States, and finished the journey with his mother, his father having died on the vessel while making the passage to this country. The little family first located on twenty acres of land situated near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which was cultivated by Mr. Zeh until he was twenty-one or twenty-two years old, and then with his mother sold the land and bought eighty acres of property in Greenville. Here the family remained four or five years, Gottlieb and two brothers clearing the land and building a little log cabin, but later one of these brothers, Christian, enlisted for service in the Union army during the Civil War, and lost his life during that struggle. The family then moved to the farm in Center township, and here Mr. Zeh was engaged in agricultural pursuits all the remainder of his life, rising to a position of influence among his fellow townsmen, who gave evidence of the esteem in which he was held by electing him to various township offices. He married Minnie Grott, daughter of Christian Grott, a neighboring farmer, and to them there were born four children, of whom Henry was the oldest.

Henry Zeh secured his education in the district schools of his native locality, which he attended during the winter months as his summers were devoted to the work on the home farm. He continued to farm the home property until purchasing his present tract, a fine piece of land adjoining the family homestead, and he is also the owner of another farm, lying east of this property, a tract of 137 acres which he has under cultivation. In 1900 Mr. Zeh erected a fine new house, having previously built two large barns. He has been successful in his general farming and dairying operations, and is considered one of the prosperous and substantial farmers of Center township. Mr. Zeh has little time for public work and takes no active part in politics, deeming it wisest to attend to his own business properly and give other things the second place. He is kind and charitable, however, and always ready to help a good cause with money and influence. He is a very busy man, but manages to be a constant attendant of the Lutheran church of Ellington, of which he is an active and prominent member. Mr. Zeh has never married; his sister, Emma, kept house for him for some years, but since her marriage he has lived alone.

SEBASTIAN GRIESBACH. One of the well-known and influential families of Center township is that of Griesbach, worthy representatives of which may be found in Sebastian, John and Henry Griesbach, brothers, sons of Casper Griesbach. Casper Griesbach was a native of Germany, and came from that country to the United States in 1860, when twenty-three years of age. Landing at New York, he proceeded thence to Milwaukee, on to Appleton, and eventually to Center township, where he purchased land in the woods and built a log house. He subsequently became one of the county's most prominent farmers and large landholders, improving his land and erecting new buildings from time to time, and finally, in 1899, he retired from active labor and went to live in Appleton, where he has his own house. Mr. Griesbach married Annie Bauer, who was born in Germany and came to this country as a girl with her parents, and she still survives. They had a family of eight children. Sebastian Griesbach was born December 31, 1868, on the home farm, and his education was secured in the district schools. Being the eldest of the family, he naturally had more of the home responsibility upon his shoulders when a boy, and had limited opportunity to secure an education, but made the most of such chances as he had, and has since educated himself by self teaching, much reading and keen observation. When his father retired, he bought his present place of 120 acres, a part of the old homestead, and here he has successfully carried on general farming and dairying operations to the present time. On April 18, 1899, Mr. Griesbach was married to Josephine Deimer, daughter of Joseph and Anna Deimer, of Ellington township. She was born in Appleton, but received her schooling in Greenville township, her father having moved from the city into the country, Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Griesbach, namely: Annie, born December 29, 1899, who died in infancy; George, born November 21, 1901; Edward, born October 28, 1903; Martha, born October 15, 1904; Claire, born April 17, 1906; Lewis Henry, born January 29, 1908, and Henry Lewis, born January 18, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Griesbach belong to St. Edward's Catholic church, at Mackville. In political matters he is a democrat.

John Griesbach was born April 16, 1874 on the old home place, in the stone house built by his father to replace the original log cabin. His education was secured in the district schools of his neighborhood and the Catholic Sisters' school at Mackville, but when he was about fifteen years of age he completed his studies and took up his duties on the home farm. On April 12, 1899, he married Sophia Ellenbecker, daughter of Richard and Annie Ellenbecker, of Center township. After his marriage, Mr. Griesbach's father moved to Appleton and sold the 200 acres to John and Henry Griesbach, and they lived on this place one and one-half years, at the end of which time John Griesbach erected a new house and barns on the land, to which he moved, and where he has lived to the present time, being engaged in general farming and also carrying on dairying. He has a family of six children, namely: Marie, Annie, Anthony, Robert, Hobart and Leonard. He and Mrs. Griesbach belong to the Catholic church at Mackville, and in political matters he is a democrat.

Henry Griesbach was born April 8, 1877, on his father's farm, where he now resides, and secured his education in the district schools and the Sisters' school at Mackville, attending the latter until he had reached the age of fourteen or fifteen years. He always worked on the home place, and at the time of his father's retirement, he purchased his present farm with his brother, John. He was married October 25, 1899, to Annie Decker, daughter of Peter and Margaret Decker, of Center township, and four children have been born to this union: Peter, born July 6, 1900; Joseph, born January 19, 1903; Katherine, born December 22, 1905, and Herman, born September 21, 1907. Like the other members of this old and honored family, Mr. and Mrs. Griesbach are consistent members of St. Edward's Catholic church.

HENRY HELMS, a highly esteemed citizen of Seymour, Wisconsin, who is now living retired from business activities, was for nearly forty years engaged in agricultural pursuits in Seymour township, where he settled as a pioneer on wild, uncultivated land. Mr. Helms was born in Hanover, Germany, April 30, 1847, son of Henry and Catherine (Robler) Helms, the former of whom died when our subject was but five years old. Mr. Helms was educated in his native country, and lived there until he attained his majority, coming to Cleveland, Ohio, in 1868, where he was joined by his mother, his sister Elizabeth and his brother William. Elizabeth is deceased, but William is still living and is a resident of Outagamie county. From Cleveland, Mr. Helms made his way to Winnebago county, Wisconsin, but only remained there six months, after which he came to Seymour township and purchased forty acres of wild land on section 4 on the north township line. There had not been a bit of clearing done when Mr. Helms located here, but he immediately erected a log cabin and set about to make the land productive. After clearing his original purchase, Mr. Helms added forty acres more and built a frame house and barn, and this was his home until his retirement from active life, at which time he removed to the city of Seymour, and turned the management of the farm over to his son Herman. Mr. Helms' farming operations were very successful, and he also met with success in the raising and shipping of high-grade cattle, a business which he carried on for a number of years. He interested himself actively in Democratic politics, and for a term of three years was a member of the town board.

In 1880, Mr. Helms was married to Pauline Tank, who was born at Farmington, Wisconsin, a daughter of August and Gusta Tank, natives of Germany, who came to the United States prior to the Civil War. Mrs. Helms was one of two daughters, and she also had six brothers. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Helms, namely: Elizabeth, Bertha, who married Walter Eike, a resident of Seymour Township, Outagamie county; Herman, Tilda and Emma.

ANDREW GEHRING, a well-known agriculturist of Grand Chute township, has been a resident of Outagamie county all of his life, and is now operating a general stock farm of 160 acres. He was born in Seymour township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, October 2, 1875, a son of Joseph and Theresa (Christol) Gehring, the mother born in Germany, April 28, 1853, and the father near Appleton, in Harrison township, May 28, 1848. Joseph Gehring worked as a farm hand in his youth, but later learned the butcher's trade, which he followed in Seymour and Appleton, but eventually rented land for a few years and then purchased the farm in Grand Chute township on which his son Andrew now resides. A few years prior to his death, Mr. Gehring retired and moved to Appleton, and there he passed away May 29, 1904, since which time his widow has been living with her children. Mr. and Mrs. Gehring were the parents of Andrew, Joseph and Carrie, who are now deceased; and Mary, the wife of Philip Johnson, a telegraph operator of the Northwestern Railroad, residing at Cedar Grove.

Andrew Gehring attended the district schools of Grand Chute township, and also spent one year in the Catholic school at Greenville, and was reared on the homestead, of which he has had charge since his father's death. The 160 acres have been devoted to general stock farming, and Mr. Gehring's operations have been very successful. He has kept his buildings in excellent shape, and the entire appearance of the farm denotes the industry and enterprise of its owner. Mr. Gehring was married October 18, 1899, to Minnie Hoh, who was born in Grand Chute township, May 28, 1880, daughter of Louis Hoh. They have had no children. Mr. Gehring is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and his political views are those of the democratic party.

LEE E. THOMPSON, one of Appleton's younger, well-known business men and a partner in the furniture concern of Saecker-Thompson Company, is a native of Appleton, born January 21, 1880. He is a son of Edward and Lucretia (Brainerd) Thompson, the former a native of New York and the latter of Connecticut. They were married in Shiocton, Outagamie county, whence they had come with their parents at an early day, and Edward Thompson is now acting in the capacity of superintendent of the Fox River Valley Paper Company, Mrs. Thompson having passed away January 1, 1905. They were the parents of six children: Percy, who resides in Oshkosh, Wisconsin; Lee E.; Harry A., manager of the Wisconsin Telephone Company; Elsie and Celia, who are living at home with their father; and Merrill, who is engaged in farming in Outagamie county. Lee E. Thompson received his education in the common schools of Appleton, and as a young man went to work for the firm of Pettibone & Peabody Company, in whose employ he remained nine years, being steadily advanced in position. When he had reached the age of twenty-three years, in 1903, he had accumulated enough money to buy an interest in the business of Mr. W. F. Saecker, well known to the furniture trade in Appleton, and with this establishment he has been connected ever since. On September 29, 1902, Mr. Thompson was united in marriage to Miss Mabel Hinchliff, daughter of Charles W. and Ella (Ackerman) Hinchliff, the former a lumberman, being for many years connected with the Pulp Wood Company, in Appleton. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have had one daughter, Margaret Louise, and they are members of the Methodist Church. Mr. Thompson is independent in politics, and fraternally connected with the Elks and Knights of Pythias.

WILLIAM COMERFORD, senior member of the firm of Comerford & Clark, large grain and feed dealers of Appleton, Wisconsin, is one of the successful self-made business men of Outagamie county, and is a native of Ireland, where he was born in 1838, a son of Thomas Comerford, a native of the Emerald Isle. The family came to the United States in 1846, in May of which year they landed in Milwaukee, and during 1847 removed to Janesville. After one year spent there they returned to Milwaukee for a short time, but eventually removed to, Oconomowoc, where Mr. Comerford died, his widow surviving him some years and passing away in Waukesha county. Mr. and Mrs. Comerford had four boys and two girls, and William and a sister are now the only survivors of this family. As a young man, William Comerford was engaged in farming in Waukesha County, and he came to Appleton in 1867, being for a long period of years engaged in the livery business. In 1893 he engaged in his present business, forming a partnership with W. O. Clark, under the firm name of Comerford & Clark, and they have continued to carry on this enterprise with much success to the present time. Mr. Comerford has always taken an active part in any measure that promised to be of benefit to his community, and he has served in the capacity of public official on a number of occasions, being town treasurer and clerk of the city, and a member of the Appleton city council during six years. He and his wife were members of St. Mary's Catholic Church, and he holds membership in the Catholic Knights, being at all times ready to give of his time or influence to movements of a church or charitable nature. In January, 1867, Mr. Comerford was married to Marion Cragen, of Waukesha county, and she died in 1910, having been the mother of seven children, as follows: Mamie, who married James L. Geary and resides in Chicago; William and Abbie, who are deceased; Margaret, who is living with her father; and Katie, Lucinda and Perry T., who are all deceased. Mr. Comerford is an excellent example of the self-made man, and the success that he has attained since the time when he made his humble start in the business world should serve as an inspiration to the ambitious youths of the rising generation.

MARION W. PEASE, a progressive and enterprising business man of Greenville township, Outagamie county, who is the proprietor of a large cheese factory and poultry farm, was born in the village of Aurorahville, Waushara county, Wisconsin, March 21, 1870, and is a son of Abraham and Sophronia T. (Holcomb) Pease, the former born in the State of New York, June 20, 1830, and the latter in Ohio, February 5, 1840. Abraham Pease was born on a farm and was reared to the life of an agriculturist, but as a young man learned the carpenter trade, which he followed for many years. As a lad he worked on the Erie Canal, on the tow-path and later as steersman, making seven trips back and forth to this State before his marriage. After this event he located in Jefferson county, Wisconsin, on a farm, where he lived for five years, and then went to Aurorahville, following the carpenter trade there for some years, and then located on a farm five miles from the village, on which he lived until his death in March, 1907. His widow now makes her home on the same farm, which is being operated by her youngest son. Marion W. Pease was the fifth child of a family of seven, and he attended school in the district schools of Waushara county, and also spent two terms in Aurorahville. At the age of nineteen years he began to learn the trade of cheesemaking, and for one season worked at Aurorahville, then going to Fargoville for one season and to Poysippi for three years. After spending one year at Fountain Valley and three years at West Bloomfield, he came to Greenville township and for two years rented his present property, after which he bought the factory, equipment, residence and one and three-quarters acres of land, and here he has since continued to operate with much success. His specialty is American cheese ("Twins"), and he also produces butter, his factory having a capacity of 12,000 pounds of milk daily, and the output at the present time being about 7,000 pounds. Mr. Pease does practically all of the work himself, and disposes of his product at Hortonville, the nearest shipping point, about two miles from his place. He is also extensively engaged in the poultry buisness, and now has several pens of pure bred Buff Orpingtons, and about 250 pure breds are constantly kept on hand. His factory is thoroughly up-to-date in every respect, and his business has grown steadily, the fine quality of the output insuring a steady trade. Mr. Pease votes the republican ticket. On March 30, 1899, Mr. Pease was married to Jennie E. Winkenwerder, who was born in Jefferson county, Wisconsin, near Watertown, December 14, 1878, daughter of Frederick and Frances (Bates) Winkenwerder, the former a native of Mecklenburg, Germany. Mr. Winkenwerder came to Outagamie county in 1903 and began to deal extensively in land, buying and selling a number of farms, and at the time of his death, in June, 1907, he was living in Hortonville, where his widow still makes her home. Mr. and Mrs. Pease have had two children: Ethel, born August 9, 1900; and Russell, born September 5, 1901. Mr. Pease is a popular member of the local order of Modern Woodmen.

FRED W. RUSCHER, who has been engaged in agricultural operations in Outagamie county since 1903, now owns an excellent property in Grand Chute township, on which he carries on general farming and dairying. He was born in Center township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, September 12, 1875, and is a son of Herman and Caroline (Tecklin) Ruscher. Herman Ruscher wa.s born in Milwaukee county, near Milwaukee, September 29, 1851, and his wife in Germany, September 18, 1840. In early life he worked as a farm hand and at the carpenter's trade, and when about twenty years of age came to Outagamie, county, where for a time he was employed by various farmers in Grand Chute township. Eventually he settled on the farm now operated by his son, which at that time belonged to Mrs. Ruscher, and here he continued to live until 1904, in which year he retired and moved to Appleton, and in that city Mrs. Ruscher died June 24, 1907. They were the parents of three children: Fred W.; Lizzie, the wife of William Schultz, a Ludington township farmer; and Anna, the wife of Ernest Ferg, a millwright of Appleton. Mrs. Ruscher had been previously married to Henry Witt, by whom she had four children, namely: William, who resides with Fred W. Ruscher; John, a farmer of Black Creek township; Henry, who is deceased; and Julius, a farmer of Grand Chute township. Fred W. Ruscher attended the district schools of Grand Chute township, and in his youth worked out among the farmers of his neighborhood until he had learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed in Hortonville, Appleton, Milwaukee and Shawano county, until he was twenty-eight years of age, at which time he settled on the old homestead. He now owns seventy-two acres of highly cultivated property in Grand Chute township, and thirty-eight acres in Greenville township, and engages extensively in dairy farming, keeping a fine herd of thoroughbred Holstein cattle for this purpose. On October 5, 1904, Mr. Ruscher was married to Miss Minnie Schraeder, born September 7, 1881, in Appleton, whose parents, Julius and Amelia (Witt) Schraeder, were both born in Germany, the former July 13, 1848, and the latter May 10, 1862. The father came to America when but seven years of age, and grew to maturity in Sugar Bush, Outagamie county, working out as a farm hand until he was able to purchase a farm in Center township, where he and his wife are still living. Mrs. Ruscher is the oldest of her parents' twelve children, and secured her education in district school No. 8, Center township. Mr. and Mrs. Ruscher have had four children: Martha, born August 29, 1905; Clara, born November 12, 1906; Herman, born July 22, 1908; and Viola, born July 8, 1910. They are consistent members of Greenville Lutheran Church.

WILLIAM GROTI, who has a well-established business at No. 875 College avenue, is one of the good, substantial business men of Appleton, where he has lived since reaching his majority. Mr. Groth is a native of Germany, born December 15, 1859, a son of John and Wilhelmina Groth, the former of whom died in Germany. William Groth came to the United States in 1881, locating in Appleton, and during the year following his mother came to this country with three children, several others of the family of eleven children remaining in the Fatherland, where several had died. Mrs. Groth settled on an Outagamie county farm on which her son William worked until 1886, and in that year engaged in business in Appleton, having learned the gunsmith trade in his native country prior to coming to America. He was the first to introduce the bicycle in Appleton, and during his business career here he has made numerous other innovations. In 1892 he erected a two-story building on the lot which he had purchased at No. 875 College avenue, and here he has carried on a large business to the present time. In 1885 Mr. Groth was united in marriage with Augusta Krause, who was born in Germany and came to the United States with her parents when a girl, her father being a well known agriculturist of Outagamie county. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Groth, as follows: William, who is engaged in business with his father; Clara, who married Charles Weller, a resident of Appleton; Richard, Irene, and two who died in infancy. Mr. Groth is a member of the Modern Woodmen, and is very popular in that order. He is esteemed as a public-spirited citizen, and although he has never engaged actively in politics, takes a keen interest in local matters, and can be found casting his vote for the candidate whom he believes will make the best official for the city's interests.

CHARLES J. HENRICHS. Some of the leading men of Outagamie county are to be found on well-regulated farms, which demonstrate the ability, business acumen and sense of the owners. Charles J. Henrichs, the owner of a fine property in Grand Chute township, is one of these prosperous men. He was born in Greenville township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, October 27, 1869, and is a son of Frederick and Mary (Schultz) Henrichs, natives of Germany. Frederick Henrichs was born September 7, 1841, and came to America with his parents in 1853, settling in Greenville township, where he eventually became a land owner and where he remained until 1876, in which year he removed to the farm now occupied by Charles J. Henrichs. For about twenty years he tilled the soil here, and then sold out to his son and bought a property in Greenville township, but after twelve years moved on to a farm in Grand Chute township, where he died one year later, April 28, 1908. His widow, who was born in 1845, is still living, and makes her home in Appleton. They were the parents of nine children, of whom three are living: Charles J.; Frederick, a resident of Appleton; and Mary, who is single and resides with her mother. Charles J. Henrichs was given the advantages of a good education attending the district schools of Grand Chute township and the German school in Greenville township, and at the age of twenty years began to manage his own affairs. With the money he had earned working for his father he purchased a couple of head of cattle and two horses, together with some farm equipment, and with these he started farming. At the time of his marriage his father gave him fifty acres of land, on which he built a home, and there resided until 1903, when he bought the rest of his farm from his father, and he now has 111 acres in this property and another tract of seventy-five acres near by which he operates as a dairy farm. In addition to this he operates a threshing outfit during threshing seasons, and he has been eminently successful in all his operations. He is an excellent example of the live, up-to-date, progressive farmer of the Twentieth Century, who knows how to make his land pay him a good profit, and how to enjoy his life among the surroundings which have always been his. He is a member of the Lutheran Church at Greenville, and is a stanch adherent of republican principles.

On December 13, 1891, Mr. Henrichs was married to Sophia Grube, who was born in Grand Chute township, August 20, 1870, daughter of Frederick and Mary (Huff) Grube, natives of Germany. After coming to this country, Mrs. Henrichs' parents resided for a time at Buffalo, New York, and then came to Appleton, Wisconsin, Mr. Grube becoming a land owner in Grand Chute township, where he died in 1899. Mrs. Grube is still living in Appleton. Of their six children, five are living: Mary, the wife of George Schraeder, a retired farmer; Anna, wife of Charles Stark of Seymour; Edith, wife of John Schmidt, a carpenter of Appleton; Mrs. Henrichs; and Henry, an employe of the Standard Manufacturing Company, residing in Appleton. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Henrichs: Arthur, born December 19, 1891; Huldah G., born January 3, 1896; Clara, born June 1, 1899, who died October 28, 1899; Orrin Sylvester, born July 2, 1905; and Harwood Herman, born July 14, 1908. Mr. Henrichs is a member of the E. F. U.

FERDINAND KOLETZKE. Some of the most successful business men in Appleton, Wisconsin, are those who have come to the United States from other countries to try to make their fortunes, and from humble beginnings have built up enterprises of a substantial nature in a comparatively short number of years. Germany has furnished this country many such good citizens, and prominent among these in Appleton is Ferdinand Koletzke, who has a well located art store in this city. Mr. Koletzke was born in Germany, where he received his educational training, and from 1879 until 1882 served in the German army, as a member of the Third Company of Reserves, in Berlin. In April, 1883, he came to the United States and, locating at Appleton, worked for four years in the furniture business. He then opened an art store, where he has since been engaged in handling pictures, picture frames, stringed instruments, etc., and has met with large success. On March 22, 1884, Mr. Koletzke was united in marriage with Miss Elvina Wagner, a native of Germany, and they have been the parents of a family of six children, three boys and three girls.

CHARLES KUHN. The farming element is very strong in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, for this is essentially an agricultural locality, both soil and climate making it a good place for general farming. Charles Kuhn, the owner of forty acres of good property, is one of the well-known farmers of Grand Chute township. He was born in Washington county, Wisconsin, September 14, 1862, a son of Andrew and Minnie (Loum) Kuhn, natives of Germany, where the father was born in 1821 and the mother in 1824. Andrew Kuhn came to the United States in 1841, and for some time worked in New York City at his trade of tailor, then removing to Washington county, where he followed the same trade for a short time. Going to Ozaukee county, he purchased a farm there, but eventually came to Outagamie county and purchased a property in Center township, which he conducted until his retirement, when he located in Appleton. He served three years during the Civil War as a member of the Thirty-fifth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and his death occured in the Soldiers' Home at Milwaukee, in 1902, his wife having passed away in 1899. Charles Kuhn was his parents' only child, and he secured his education in the schools of Center township, remaining on the home farm until his marriage, when he started working at the carpenter trade. After following this for a time in Appleton, he joined the City Fire Department, of which he was a member for fifteen years, and at the end of this time bought the farm on which he now resides, a forty-acre tract on which he carries on general farming. He is a member of St John's Lutheran Church, and in politics is independent.

On September 25, 1883, Mr. Kuhn was married (first) to Miss Anna Schumaker, born in Germany, May 1, 1863, daughter of John and Louise (Schroder) Schumaker, natives of Germany, and later residents of Appleton. Mrs. Kuhn died in April, 1901, having been the mother of eight children, as follows: Minnie, born April 5, 1885, the wife of Frank Faville, of Milwaukee; Ferdinand William, born February 18, 1887; Rosie, born March 12, 1889; Pauline, born May 20, 1891; Elmer, born March 16, 1895; Ella, born April 28, 1897, who died April 11, 1911; Lizzie, born April 11, 1899; and Emil, who died in infancy. On December 4, 1901, Mr. Kuhn was married (second) to Mollie Brucks, who was born in Prussia, September 17, 1883, daughter of William and Augusta (Zeymer) Brucks, who came to this country about 1871 and settled in Center township, where they resided for many years and then moved to the village of Black Creek. After a short residence there, they moved to a small farm in Black Creek township, where Mrs. Brucks died, and Mr. Brucks then went to Cicero with his daughter, and there he followed his trade of blacksmith up to the time of his death.

REUBEN F. SHEPHERD, who has for some years been successfully engaged in the real estate business in Appleton, was born August 5, 1870, in Osborn township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, a son of Sewell and Jennie M. (Dowd) Shepherd, the former a native of Farnum, Canada, and the latter born in Ireland. George W. Shepherd, the grandfather of Reuben F., came to Wisconsin in 1838, his family following him during the following year and settling in Waukesha county, where they engaged in farming. During the early '50s, George W. and Sewell Shepherd conducted a store in Milwaukee for a short time, but eventually came to Outagamie county, in 185--, and settled on property in section 5, Osborn township, where George W. Shepherd died. Sewell Shepherd continued to operate this property until 1877, and in that year went on the road as a commercial traveler for the West DePere Agricultural Works, with which company he was connected in this capacity for about sixteen years, then engaging in the butcher business at Seymour. After a short time he engaged in the fanning mill business, as a manufacturer at Seymour, but in 1894 or 1895 came to Appleton, where he was engaged in the real estate business up to the time of his death in September, 1909. His widow still survives. They were the parents of four children, as follows: Louise, who lives at home; Charles F., residing at Rhinelander, Wisconsin, a commercial traveler; Evangeline, who married John Farwell, a resident of Kaukauna; and Reuben F. Reuben F. Shepherd received a common school education in the vicinity of his father's farm in Osborn township and later in Seymour, and entered his father's business office in Appleton when he had completed his educational training. He continued with him until the time of his death, and then succeeded him in the real estate business, in which he is still engaged. In 1907 he admitted C. B. Tift to partnership in the business. Mr. Shepherd was married November 22, 18--, to Iva V. Andrews, of Waterloo, Wisconsin, daughter of Wallace Andrews, an agriculturist and early settler of Dodge county, and to this union there have been born two children, namely: Maude J. and Robert A., both residing with their parents.

HERMAN PRIEWE, who is engaged in agricultural pursuits on section 5, Seymour township, and is also proprietor of the Square Deal blacksmith shop at North Seymour, Wisconsin, is a native of Germany, havng been born at Pomerania, April 5, 1854, a son of Christian and Elizabeth (Behnke) Priewe, natives of the Fatherland who never left that country, Mr. Priewe dying there in 1863, aged fifty-six years, and his wife in 1900 when about eighty years of age. They had these children: Charles, who is deceased; August; Tena; Caroline and Herman, the latter being the only one of the family to come to the United States. Herman Priewe learned the blacksmith and wagonmaker's trades in his native country after completing his educational training, and there started to work. On May 19, 1881, he was married to Ernestine Luedke, and in June 2, following they started out for the new world, where Mr. Priewe felt that he could find better opportunities for displaying his abilities. From Baltimore, Maryland, where the young people first settled, they came west to Green Bay, Wisconsin, and at the latter city Mr. Priewe began to follow his trade, an occupation which he continued to follow for a period covering ten years. The next five years found him the proprietor of a grocery store at Green Bay, and during a like period he conducted a store at Little Suamico, Oconto county, and he then purchased a farm of eighty acres on which he carried on operations until coming to North Seymour in 1908. Here he has a wagon and blacksmith shop, and deals in farm implements, and he has erected a handsome residence, surrounded by well-kept lawns and. orchards.

Mrs. Priewe is the daughter of John and Henrietta (Linstead) Luedke, who came to the United States in 1884, Mr. Luedke carrying on farming in Brown county until his death at the age of seventy-four years. His wife passed away in 1908, when seventy-two years of age. Their children were: Ernestine, Theresa and Mary. Mr. and Mrs. Priewe have had a family of six children: Alfred, who is engaged in business with his father; Otto, residing at Marinette; Mamie, who married W. Philhold; Hattie, who lives at Marinette; Ola, a resident of Green Bay; and Arthur, who lives at home.

JOSEPH LIEBHABER, one of the younger generation of agriculturists of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, is engaged in general farming and cattle and chicken raising on a fine sixty-acre tract located on section 26, in Seymour township. Mr. Liebhaber is a native of Seymour township, where he was born on his father's farm, November 10, 1880, a son of Benno and Anna (Lawrence) Liebhaber and a grandson of Winegan and Anna Liebhaber, natives of Germany. Benno Liebhaber was born in Germany, June 15, 1845, and came to the United States in 1868, locating in Appleton, Wisconsin, where he remained for sixteen years, and then engaging in farming near that city. After eight years he located in Seymour township, where he has since followed agricultural pursuits and now has an excellent property of 160 acres. Joseph Liebhaber attended the district schools of Seymour township, and remained at home assisting his father until his marriage, April 14, 1909, when he located on his present sixty-acre property. He has a modern eight-room residence, equipped with all modern conveniences; a large barn, 40x80 feet, with a roomy basement, and one of the finest chicken houses in the township, 14x50 feet, in which he raises White Leghorn chickens, and markets every week from forty to fifty dozens of eggs. In dddition he raises high grade cattle, horses and hogs.

Mr. Liebhaber was married, April 14, 1909, to Gertrude Huhm, who was born July 1, 1889, in Black Creek township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, daughter of Joseph and Dorothea (Fitting) Huhm, natives of Germany and early settlers of Black Creek township where they now reside. Mr. and Mrs. Huhm's children, all of whom are living, are as follows: Joseph, Mary, George, Barbara, Jennie, Regina, Francis, Lizzie, Gertrude, Caroline, John, Mathew and Peter.

GUSTAF E. LUCK(Lueck), a successful farmer of Greenville township, Outagamie county, was born in Prussia, Germany, December 27, 1861, and is a son of Christof and Caroline (Cruger) Luck, also natives of Prussia, where the father was born May 18, 1826, and the mother December 25, 1828. They came to America in the winter of 1869, locating at Fremont, Waupaca county, Wisconsin, at which point Mr. Luck followed the trade of blacksmith for a few years, eventually buying a farm near that place, on which he operated until his death, August 18, 1890. Mrs. Luck resided there some years after her husband's demise, but three years prior to her own death she went to reside with her daughter in Hortonia, and passed away there in March, 1900. Gustaf E. Luck was the sixth in order of birth of his parents' twelve children, and he secured his education in the schools of Fremont. At the age of sixteen years he started out from the home farm and commenced to work on his own account at whatever employment presented itself, and until twenty-three years of age he was employed at mill work, in lumber yards, loading vessels at Peshtigo Harbor, and as a farm hand. He was married at this time and purchased his present farm of seventy-four acres, on which he has since been operating. He has been a hard worker and by good management and systematic methods has made a success of his life work. In connection with general farming he is also engaged in stock raising to some extent. On October 23, 1890, Mr. Luck was married to Mathilda Schultz, who was born in West Prussia, Germany, February 17, 1865, where her parents, Carl L. and Gustena (Steffen) Schultz, were born May 9, 1832, and March 22, 1834, respectively. They came to the United States in 1871, locating at Fremont, Waupaca county, Wisconsin, and two years later Mr. Schultz bought a farm near that place. On July 19, 1893, Mrs. Schultz died, and after a few years Mr. Schultz left the farm and came to live with Mr. and Mrs. Luck, but six years later went to live with another daughter, at Neenah, and there died two years later, February 7, 1905. Mrs. Luck was the third born in a family of seven children. Mr. and Mrs. Luck have had a family of six children, born as follows: Louis, June 24, 1891; William, July 10, 1892; Ella, October 18, 1893; Walter, July 12, 1895; Edwin, April 2, 1898; and Dora, born May 26, 1903, who died May 27th of that year. Mr. and Mrs. Luck are members of the Lutheran church. He is an adherent of republican principles.

HENRY SOMMERS, a successful farmer and stock raiser of Greenville township, operating on 120 acres of well cultivated soil, was born in this township, October 6, 1858, and is a son of Edward and Anna (O'Leary) Sommers. Mr. Sommers' parents were born in County Wexford, Ireland, and on coming to the United States, in 1857, located at once in Greenville township and purchased a tract of ten acres in the western part of the township. Edward Sommers cleared this little tract and in the meantime worked for other farmers of his vicinity until he was able to purchase the present farm of Henry Sommers, on which he spent the balance of his life, dying June 1, 1901. He was a hard and persevering worker all of his life and arose to a position of prominence among the farmers of his community. He and his wife, who died January 25, 1909, had seven children, of whom three survive: Henry, Ella, the wife of George M. Bishop, an Idaho mining man; and Johnnie, a cement worker and farmer of Ellington township. Henry Sommers attended district school No. 4, in Greenville township, and worked at home on his father's farm until twenty-two years of age, at which time he began working on the river as a log driver during the summer months, and in the woods in winter. After about two years he returned to his home and worked on the farm in summer and woods in winter for about eleven years, after which he remained on the homestead until about 1899, when he purchased a sixty-acre farm adjoining the homestead. Subsequently he purchased the Barkley homestead, a tract of seventy acres, but he later turned this over to his brother as his share of the land accumulated while in partnership, Henry taking the homestead. He has continued to live on this farm to the present time and now has a fertile tract of 120 acres which he devotes to general farming, and also feeds a number of steers for the market every winter. His place is well equipped with modern, substantial buildings, and its appearance denotes the presence of able management. Mr. Sommers is a member of the Roman Catholic church at Stephensville. He is a democrat in his political views, and has served as supervisor of his township for six years. On January 5, 1899, Mr. Sommers was united in marriage with Miss Anna Heiderman, who was born at Neenah, Wisconsin, December 14, 1873, daughter of John and Mary (---------------) Heiderman, the former a native of Germany and the latter of Scotland. They were early settlers of Neenah, and are now actively engaged in agricultural pursuits in Bovina township. Mr. and Mrs. Sommers have had six children, born as follows: Edward, October 18, 1900; Nellie, October 19, 1902; James, December 6, 1904; Frankie, January 28, 1906; Henry, December 12, 1908, and Willie, January 5, 1911.

HERMAN J. SCHLEGEL, one of the enterprising and progressive business men of Appleton, Wisconsin, whose sheet metal establishment is located at No. 808 Morrison street, was born May 10, 1863, in Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, a son of Julius and Margaret (Renner) Schlegel, natives of Germany. Mr. Schlegel's parents came to the United States during the early '50s, locating at Fond du Lac, where they resided until 1868, and in that year came to Outagamie county. Mr. Schlegel was a sheet metal worker, and eventually opened a shop in DePere, where he resided until his death in 1897. His widow, who survives him, is seventy-six years of age and makes her home with her son Herman J. They had a family of four children: Alwin M., who resides in Minnesota; Edward, a resident of DePere, TWsconsin; Herman J.; and Emma, who is deceased. Herman J. Schlegel received his education in the public schools of Appleton, and as a youth learned the sheet metal trade with his father, later going into business with a Mr. Huetter, in the hardware line, continuing with him for one year and working out for a time thereafter. In 1899 he opened a shop on Appleton street, in the sheet metal line, and in 1902 he moved to his present place of business, a two-story shop on Morrison street, where he also has his home. He employs four men, supplying the local trade with the "Badger" furnace and the "Badger" washing machine, the latter one of his own inventions. All modern appliances are used in Mr. Schlegel's shop, electric power driving the machinery, and the excellence of his work testifies to his mechanical skill. In 1888 Mr. Schlegel was united in marriage with Louise Kramer, who died October 6, 1897, leaving one boy, who died April 1, 1911. Mr. Schlegel was married (second) in 1898, to Marie Dominske of Appleton, and they have had one son.

FREDERICK CHRISTIAN WARNING, whose fine farm of seventy-five acres in Greenville township is located on Hortonville Rural Route No. 19, is a native of the Fatherland, having been born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, October 4, 1850, a son of Frederick and Anna (Bauer) Warning. The family came directly to Wisconsin on first locating in this country in 1883, and settled in Hortonville, where Frederick Warning died nine days later, and his widow survived him until only 1892. Frederick Christian Warning attended the schools of his native country, and when fourteen years of age he started to work as a farm hand. He served the three customary years as a member of the regular army, and was married in Germany, coming to America about five years later. He worked on the railroad for about nine years off and on and also did. some farm work, and in 1892 he purchased his present farm of seventy-five acres. His farm is well cultivated, neatly fenced, and fully equipped with substantial buildings, including a modern residence, and the size of the crops that he sends to market testify to Mr. Warning's ability as an agriculturist. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and is independent in politics, having never had any aspirations for political preferment. On November 1, 1878, Mr. Warning was married to Mary Scharf, who was also born in Mechlenberg-Schwerin, Germany, May 20, 1854, daughter of John and Mary (Berkenhauer) Scharf, natives of that country, who came to Hortonville in 1883 and here spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying about 1898, and the mother in 1893. Mr. and Mrs. Warning have had four children: Anna, born August 1, 1879, wife of Emil Magedanz, of Hortonia township; Minnie, born March 10, 1884, wife of Harry Marcks, a farmer of Greenville township; and Otto, born November 9, 1885, and Herman born August 17, 1890, the latter a carpenter, residing at home.

WILLIAM J. VOSS, a prosperous and progressive business citizen of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is proprietor of the only establishment in the city dealing exclusively in phonographs, trunks and traveling goods, was born September 22, 1870, in Waterford, Wisconsin, a son of William and Dora Voss, the former a retired blacksmith and wagon manufacturer of Milwaukee. William J. Voss secured his education in the public schools of Waterford and later attended a business college in Milwaukee, after graduation from which he became bookkeeper in a hardware store in Milwaukee for two years. He then went to another hardware concern where he served in a like capacity during a period covering five years, and was then conected with hardware establishments at various places until November, 1906, when he opened a phonograph store as a side line, the business being cared for by his wife. He had come to Appleton in 1902, and he was connected with the Schlafer Hardware Company until 1907, at which time he added trunks and traveling outfits to his business, and gave up his position in order to devote all of his time to the new enterprise. This has proved very successful, and Mr. Voss now has a well established business, his establishment covering a floor space 22x100 feet, first story and basement. He has made the most of his opportunities and merits the success that has come to him. On March 15, 1901, Mr. Voss was united in marriage with Pauline Wrege, of Saginaw, Michigan, and they have had two sons, Dudley, aged eight years, and William, who is eight months old. Mr. Voss's fraternal connections are with the Elks, the Knights of Pythias and the Equitable Fraternal Union, in all of which he is very popular.

JOHN MELTZ, one of the prosperous farmers of Greenville township, who owns a tract of highly cultivated land situated on Appleton Rural Route No. 2, was born in Greenville township, Outagamie county, May 19, 1866, and is a son of Frederick and Mary (Cobbin) Meltz, natives of Germany, who early came to America and settled on a wild farm in Greenville township. Frederick Meltz spent the balance of his life in cultivating his farm and clearing it from the timber, and here he died about 1887, his widow surviving him for six years. Of their eight children, three are still living: Christian, residing near Oshkosh; John; and Charles, of Greenville township. John Meltz attended district school No. 13, and until he was married resided on the home farm. He then went to Appleton, where he was employed for one year, after which he purchased his present property, a tract of 131 acres of finely improved property, which he is operating in a general way, making a specialty of Guernsey cattle. His present commodious residence was erected by him in 1904, and he has made all of the other improvements, making an up-to-date, thoroughly equipped modern farm. Mr. Meltz is a member of the Lutheran Church, and is independent in politics. On November 12, 1887, Mr. Meltz was married to Miss Mary Hoh, who was born in Greenville township, January 13, 1869, daughter of Nicholas and Hannah (Schroeder) Hoh, the former born in Saxony, Germany, June 12, 1842, and the latter in Pomerania, September 21, 1848. Mr. Hoh came to the United States with his parents when five years of age, the family settling in Grand Chute township, where he grew to manhood and became a land owner, passing away there in 1889. His widow now makes her home in Appleton. They were the parents of six children, all of whom are living: Mary, the wife of Mr. Meltz; William, a painter of Appleton; Tillie, the wife of Ed Jacquot, in the real estate business in Hortonville; George, a butcher of Kellier, Minnesota; Charles, engaged in the barber business in Seattle, Washington; and Emma, a dressmaker residing in Chicago. Just before the close of the Civil War Mr. Hoh enlisted in a Wisconsin regiment. He was a prominent man of his day and held various township offices. Mr. and Mrs. Meltz have had three children: Emory C., born April 21, 1888; Viola B., born March 19, 1893; and Hazel L., born April 28, 1908.

HERMAN JOHN PETERS, a progressive and industrious young agriculturist of Greenville township, who is the owner of a finely cultivated farm of eighty acres, was born in Center township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, April 11, 1878, and is a son of Fred and Elenora (Bohl) Peters, natives of Germany. Fred Peters was born in Mecklenburg, May 12, 1827, and his wife June 15, 1837, and they came to the United States in 1863, settling in New York State, where they resided for two years. They then made their way west to Center township, and here bought land and engaged in farming, continuing to reside there until they died, Mr. Peters' death occurring about 1897, and that of his widow October 17, 1908. They were the parents of nine children, of whom Herman John is the youngest. He received his education in the district schools of the neighborhood of his father's farm, and upon attaining his majority continued to work on the home farm for wages for two years, and then purchased the old homestead, which he cultivated until April, 1910, at which time he sold out and bought his present property. This excellent tract of eighty acres has been greatly improved by Mr. Peters, who has remodeled and repaired the buildings and added to the equipment, and it is neatly fenced and presents an appearance that indicates able management. On November 29, 1906, he was married to Augusta Braun, who was born in Saxville township, Waushara county, Wisconsin, May 7, 1886, daughter of August and Elizabeth (Stallmann) Braun, the former born in Pomerania, Germany, October 23, 18---- , and the latter in Waukesha county, Wisconsin, May 1, 18----. They came to Saxville township from Berlin, Wisconsin, where they were married, and resided on the farm until their deaths, the father passing away August 23, 1908, and his wife on the same date. They had thirteen children, Mrs. Peters being the fourth in order of birth. Two of Mrs. Peters' sisters are living with her: Emma, born May 28, 1895, and Lena, born October 8, 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Peters have had two children: Evaline, born May 4, 1908; and Verna, born March 10, 1910. The family is connected with the Ellington Lutheran Church. In political matters, Mr. Peters is independent, and has never aspired to public office.

WARREN ANDERSON, deceased, who was one of the pioneers of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, near where he spent many years in agricultural pursuits, spent his latter years in Appleton, where his daughter, Miss Susan E. Anderson, is now engaged in the musical instrument business. Warren Anderson was a son of Harvey Anderson, and was born in New York, from which state he came west to Wisconsin in 1846, locating first at Sheboygan. Both father and son engaged in agricultural pursuits in Fond du Lac county, and there Harvey Anderson and his wife died. In about 1888 Warren Anderson and his wife came to Appleton, and here spent the remainder of their lives, Mr. Anderson passing away April 16, 1897. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Marietta Randall, was also born in New York, from whence her family removed first to Pennsylvania and later to Wisconsin. She died in Appleton, April 18, 1911, having been the mother of nine children: Warren R., a merchant of Eldorado, Wisconsin; Bertine H., who is engaged in the music business at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin; Susan E.; Mrs. Emma Hall, a resident of Minnesota; Mrs. F. R. Richardson (Josephine), a resident of Appleton; Eva, who married D. S. Stephenson, of Chicago; Effie, Eva's twin, who married A. E. Berndt, of San Francisco, California; John G., residing in Minnesota, engaged in the grocery business; and Nellie V., who died at the age of sixteen years.

Miss Susan E. Anderson came to Appleton, July 12, 1883, having studied music under Professor Philmore, of Ripon. For two years she was engaged as organist of the Presbyterian Church, and also engaged in teaching music, and then opened her present musical establishment, where she carries a full line of pianos and musical supplies and accessories of all kinds. She has a model store and has proved herself a good business woman, perfectly capable of handling a constantly growing trade.

WILLIAM P. COTTER, who carries on general farming on an eighty-acre tract of good land lying in Grand Chute township, was born November 6, 1882, in Center township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and is a son of James and Julia (Mullen) Cotter. James Cotter, who was also a native of Center township, where he was born about 1857, grew to manhood in that locality and became a landowner, but later removed to Appleton, where for a number of years he served as deputy sheriff. He then came to Grand Chute township, purchased a farm, and carried on agiticultural operations until his death in 1902. His widow, who was born in Osborn township, is still living here. They had a family of six children, namely: John, a farmer, residing with his mother in this township; William P.; Ella, single, residing at home; May, the wife of Robert McGinnis, a farmer of Grand Chute township; George, a farmer of North Dakota; and James, who lives with his mother. William P. Cotter secured his education in St. Mary's School at Appleton and the district schools of Grand Chute township, and at the age of thirteen years began working as a farm hand, continuing at this occupation until his marriage. At this time he settled on the farm which he now occupies, a fine property of eighty acres of well-improved land, on which he has carried on general farming with much success. He is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and in political matters is a Democrat. On September 7, 1905, Mr. Cotter was married to Clara Schroeder, who was born in Grand Chute township, on what is known as Spencer Road, May 15, 1888, daughter of George and Mary (Gruebe) Schroeder, the latter of whom was born on the farm now occupied by Mr. Cotter, December 25, 1863, and the former at Neenah, Wisconsin, March 15, 1858. Mr. Schroeder, who was always a farmer, resided at what is known as Mud Creek until 1896, and in that year purchased the farm now cultivated by Mr. Cotter, and here he lived until 1907, then removing to Appleton, where he and Mrs. Schroeder now live retired. Mrs. Cotter was their only child. One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cotter, namely: Lucile, born June 9, 1906.

JOSEPH ARTHUR HODGINS, who is engaged in cultivating a farm of seventy acres in Grand Chute township, is a native.of this township in Outagamie county, born June 22, 1869, a son of Patrick and Julia (O'Hare) Hodgins, the former born in County Louth, Ireland in 1826, and the latter of Irish parentage in Canada, May 1, 1832. Patrick Hodgins was nineteen years of age when he came to the United States, and he first located near Philadelphia; in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, where for about five years he worked as a farm hand. He then went to Milwaukee for a short period, and later took up 160 acres from the government, later selling forty acres of this property to a French-Indian named Jake Curdy. He continued to cultivate this property up to the time of his death, at the age of seventy-eight years, changing the land from a wilderness covered with masses of white pine timber into one of the finest properties in the township. His widow survived him only two weeks. Of their ten children six are living: Theresa, the wife of Alpheus Crowe, of Lawrence, California; Katharine, who is single and resides with her brother, Joseph A.; Sarah, the widow of Harry Lowell, of Seattle, Washington; Etta, a teacher, residing with her brother, Joseph A.; Joseph Arthur; and Peter, connected with the Denver postoffice department. Joseph Arthur Hodgins attended the Second and Third ward schools of Appleton, and at the age of nineteen years became a school teacher, continuing as such in this district for one year. He then worked out among the farmers for a short time, but at the time of the death of his oldest brother, he went home and there he has continued to operate to this time. He has seventy acres devoted to general farming, to which he now gives his entire attention, although at one time he was a partner in the Lowell Drug Comhpany. He is a member of the Bankers' Life Insurance Company of Des Moines, Iowa, is a member of the Roman Catholic Church and of the Catholic Order of Foresters, and is independent in politics and serving as school clerk. Mr. Hodgins is unmarried.

JOHN JULIUS, who owns one of the finest farms in Greenville township, an excellent tract of 144 acres, has been intimately connected with the agricultural interests of this section for a long period, and is well and favorably known throughout this part of the county. Mr. Julius was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, April 20, 1847, and is a son of Frederick and Louisa (Daho) Julius, natives of the Fatherland. Mr. Julius attended school in Greenville township, and at the age of fourteen years began working out among the farmers as a hand. When he was twenty-three years of age he learned the trade of mason, which he followed in connection with farming for about seven years, then renting a property from his father. Some years later he purchased this land, and he has added to it from time to time and made many improvements as the years have passed, adding to the buildings and equipments. He now operates his farm in a general way, marketing hay, cattle and grain. He has a comfortable residence, a barn 40x84 feet, and numerous outbuildings for the shelter of his grain, stock and machinery. In addition, Mr. Julius has a fine automobile, which he finds of much assistance in his farm work. In political matters he is a Democrat. Mr. Julius was married October 22, 1870, to Mary Jennerjahn, born March 1, 1851, in Mecklenburg, Germany, daughter of Christian and Mary (Weisenberg) Jennerjahn, natives of that country. Nine children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Julius, namely: Mary, born June 8, 1871, wife of John Burr, a resident of Neenah; Louis, born January 31, 1873, a railroad man of Fond du Lac; Louisa, born September 5, 1875, the wife of William Bentle, connected with the hardware business in Antigo; John, born December 26, 1877, employed in the paper mills at Neenah; Charles, born November 17, 1879, a railroad man of Fond du Lac; Lena, born November 4, 1881, the wife of William Burr of Neenah; Tena, born December 22, 1883, the wife of William Weismer, of Clayton township; and August, born August 8, 1886, and Ernest, born October 10, 1890, who are at home and operating the farm with their father.

A. H. DAVIS, who is the proprietor of a general store at Appleton, Wisconsin, is an enterprising and progressive business man, and has had a long and varied experience in his line of work. He was born November 20, 1870, in Richmond county, Wisconsin, a son of C. W. and Adele Davis, the former a native of Canada and the latter of New York, who came to Wisconsin in 1860, where the father was engaged in a general store business during the remainder of his life. A. H. Davis received a public school education in Richmond county, and as a youth began his mercantile training in the general store of his father. Securing the necessary financial backing he first embarked in a business venture at Excelsior Springs, where he remained for sixteen years, and then carried on a like enterprise at Lone Rock for five years, and on March 29, 1910, came to Appleton and bought out the general store business of George B. Maurer. He has a complete, up-to-date line of groceries, clothing, dry goods, hats, caps, boots, shoes and notions, and takes justifiable pride in a large, satisfied trade which he has built up through his own efforts to please. Mr. Davis is a popular member of the Odd Fellows, but he has found no time to engage in matters of a public nature, although always ready to give his influence to those movements which he believes will be of benefit to the conmmunity. In 1890 he was united in marriage with Miss Anna Smith, who is also a native of Richmond county, Wisconsin, and to this union there has been born a family of four daughters and one son.

FREDERICK BENTLE, who is extensively engaged in agricultural pursuits in the township of Greenville, Outagamie county, has spent his entire career as a tiller of the soil, and has a thorough and practical knowledge of agricultural conditions here. He is a native of Winnebago county, Wisconsin, and was born September 20, 1863, a son of Flarie and Sophia (Schefe) Bentle. Flarie Bentle was born in Ohio, and came to Outagamie county when he was fourteen years of age, his father having been killed during the Mexican War. For some years he was engaged in working as a farm hand, but finally purchased some land in Winnebago county, and there he was engaged in farming up to the time of his death, in 1893, his widow surviving him only two years. Frederick Bentle is one of a family of six children, and his education was secured in the district schools of his neighborhood. He was reared to be a farmer, and his boyhood and youth were spent in work on his father's farm and those of the neighbors who needed his services, and when he was twenty-six years of age he bought his present property in Greenville township, upon which he has made numerous improvements. He has remodeled and repaired the residence and barns, in addition to erecting numerous outbuildings for the shelter of his stock, grain and live stock, and now carries on general farming and stock raising, marketing hogs, cattle and dairy products and such hay and grain as he does not feed. He has other interests, among which may be mentioned stock in several Oklahoma oil companies. During the past fourteen years he has served very acceptably as treasurer of his school district. In 1888 Mr. Bentle was married to Anne Zachow, who was born in Clayton township, Winnebago county, daughter of John Zachow of that township. Four children have been born to this union, namely: Clara, John, Ella and Lawrence.

DR. HENRY T. JOHNSON of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is a well-known advocate of the Osteopathic school of healing, was born June 11, 1883, in Oconto, Wisconsin, a son of M. P. and Catherine (Christensen) Johnson, pioneer settlers of Marinette, Wisconsin, where Mr. Johnson was engaged for many years in a butchering business. Henry T. Johnson was the fifth of his parents' eleven children, and his early education was secured in the public schools of Oconto and Marinette, after leaving which he took a course in the University of Wisconsin. By this time he had decided upon a career and entered the American School of Osteopathy at Kirksville, Missouri, and was graduated therefrom in June, 1909, immediately after which he came to Appleton, and here has since been engaged in an extensive practice. He is a member of the National Osteopathic Association and the Wisconsin Osteopathic Society, and he and Mrs. Johnson are consistent members of the Lutheran Church, which they attend in Appleton. On June 29, 1910, Dr. Johnson was married to Miss Lillian M. Miller, of Marinette, Wisconsin, in which city her father, S. C. Miller, is the owner of a planing mill.

DR. O. N. JOHNSON, who is widely known in Appleton and the surrounding country in stock circles as a veterinary surgeon of unquestioned skill, is a native of Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, where he was born April 5, 1873, a son of Charles and Elsie Johnson, the former deceased, and the latter a resident of the State of Washington. O. N. Johnson secured a common school education, and after graduating from the University of Wisconsin in 1896, he entered the Chicago. Veterinary College, from which he was graduated in the spring of 1906. Prior to entering the veterinary college, Mr. Johnson had been employed as stock manager of the Baltimore estate in North Carolina, at which he was occupied until deciding to enter upon the study of veterinary surgery. Dr. Johnson has built up a large and lucrative practice in Appleton, and he is well known to the farmers and stock raisers all over this part of Outagamie county for the advancement he has given to the study of his profession and for the many remarkable achievements he has made. His practice is so large that it necessitates the use of a high-power automobile, and his knowledge of stock matters has been recognized by his election to the position of secretary and treasurer of the Fox River Valley Guernsey Breeders' Association. In the improvement of stock conditions, Dr. Johnson has won an enviable reputation and he is immensely popular throughout the district in which he practices.

On November 8, 1898, Dr. Johnson was united in marriage with Ida Frederick, daughter of August Frederick of Greenville, Wisconsin, and they have had two children: Ruth M. and Eleanor A. Dr. and Mrs. Johnson are consistent members of the Presbyterian Church. His fraternal connection is with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.

DANIEL McGINNIS, who has been connected with the agricultural pursuits of Greenville township, Outagamie county, all of his life, is now engaged in cultivating the old McGinnis homestead, which was settled by his father, Michael McGinnis, a native of Ireland. Michael McGinnis came to this country in young manhood, bringing with him his young wife, who had borne the maiden name of Mary Ryan, and was also a native of the Emerald Isle. On first coming to America, Michael McGinnis settled in Appleton, Wisconsin, where he secured employment on the canal, and was so occupied until he purchased the farm in Greenville township, which he was engaged in operating until his death in 1903. His wife had passed away when the son Daniel was three or four years old. The latter, who was one of a family of five children, was born in Appleton, in 1856, and received his education in the country district schools. He was reared to the life of an agriculturist and never left the home farm, which he worked until 1883 as a renter and then purchased it. He has engaged in general farming and stock raising, marketing hogs, cattle and what grain and hay he does not feed, in addition to dairy products, and has been successful in his ventures. He has brought his property to a high state of cultivation, and its general appearance denotes the presence of good and able management. In 1875 Mr. McGinnis was united in marriage with Juliet Thompson, daughter of Robert Thompson of Menasha, Wisconsin, Mrs. McGinnis' birthplace, and seven children were born to this union: Mattie, Mary Ellen, Robert, George, Gertrude, Elmer and Earl. Mrs. McGinnis died January 18, 1907, in the faith of the Catholic Church, to which her husband also belongs, and she was buried in the Catholic Cemetery at Neenah.

JULIUS C. WITT, who owns and cultivates a fine farm of fifty acres in Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, is a native of this township, where he was born May 2, 1872, a son of Henry and Caroline (Tecklin) Witt, natives of Germany. Henry Witt was born in 1835, and came to America as a young man, locating in Wisconsin and taking up a farm in Grand Chute township, where he was living at the time of his death in 1874. Mrs. Witt was born September 12, 1841, and was sixteen years of age when she came to this country with her parents, who became residents of Outagamie county. After her husband's death she rented the farm for one year, and was then married to Herman Ruscher and moved back to the property, but after some years they located in Appleton, where she died in 1907. Mr. Ruscher still makes his home in Appleton. Julius C. Witt attended the district schools and German schools in Greenville township, and remained with his mother until he was twenty years of age. Having learned the trade of carpenter, he began to work at that occupation in Appleton, where he was so engaged during the next fifteen years. He then purchased the land on which he is now operating, a tract of fifty acres located in Grand Chute township which he has brought up to a high state of cultivation. He has practically given up all carpenter work in order to give all of his time and attention to the duties of his farm, and his efforts have met with well-merited success. Mr. Witt is a member of St. Paul's Lutheran Church at Appleton. He is independent in politics and has never aspired to office, although he has served several terms as school director of his township.

Mr. Witt was married January 2, 1896, to Mary Stark, daughter of Andrew Stark of Grand Chute township, and they have had five children, born as follows: Harry Edward, December 28, 1899; Rosie Anna, February 6, 1902; Matilda Alma, March 9, 1904; Irving Julius, June 14, 1908; and George Herman, May 22, 1910.

CARL GRUETZMACHER, an industrious and well-to-do agriculturist of Greenville township, who is engaged in cultivating a fine tract of 133 acres, is a native of the Fatherland, and was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, September 25, 1857, a son of John and Mary (Dahl) Gruetzmacher. John Gruetzmnacher was a wagonmaker and landowner in Germany, which country neither he nor his wife ever left. Carl Gruetzmacher was the next to the youngest of a family of seven children and he secured his education in the schools of his native country, from whence he came to the United States in 1882, settling at once in Outagamie county. During the next five years he was engaged in working for others, and he then rented the property adjoining his present farm for a like period. Moving to this land, Mr. Gruetzmacher rented it for eight years and then purchased the property which he has developed into one of the finest equipped and highly cultivated tracts of this part of the township. He has added to the buildings and now has a substantial, comfortable residence, a large barn and numerous outbuildings for the shelter of his cattle, grain and farm equipment, and his property is growing more valuable every year. He farms along practical lines, marketing what hay and grain he does not use to feed, as well as cattle, hogs and dairy products. On April 2, 1882, Mr. Gruetzmacher was married to Mary Ehde, who was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, July 25, 1859, daughter of John and Mary (Ehde) Ehde, landholders in Germany who never came to the United States. Six children have been born to this union: Carl, born June 17, 1881, single and residing at home; Ella, born January 15, 1883, the wife of Louis Menning, a farmer of Greenville township; Freda, born January 5, 1886; Emma, born March 29, 1887; Elsie, born September 29, 1889; and Rosie, born October 14, 1890, all single and residing at home. Mr. Gruetzmacher is independent in political views, and he and his family are members of the Lutheran Church.

JOSEPH LINSMEYER, a well known citizen of Isaar, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, where he conducts a blacksmith shop and handles general farm implements, was born June 25, 1874, in Franklin township, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Joseph and Marian (Kaulessaus) Linsmeyer, natives of Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Linsmeyer came to the United States with their four children, Barbara, Maggie, Mary and John, of whom Mary is now deceased, and settled in Franklin township, being one of the earliest families there, and Mr. Linsmeyer began agricultural operations on a tract of 120 acres of wild land, the family home being a log shanty. This humble dwelling and the log stable that had originally been built were later replaced by good substantial frame buildings, and here Mr. and Mrs. Linsmeyer still make their home, he having reached the advanced age of ninety years, while she is eighty years of age. Five children were born to this worthy couple after they had come to the United States, namely: Joseph, Mathew, Andrew, Sophia and Rosa.

Joseph Linsmeyer secured his education in the district schools of Manitowoc county, and his boyhood days were spent on the home farm. As a youth he learned the trade of blacksmith, and at the age of sixteen years he began to follow this occupation, working around the home place for five years. On May 1, 1895, he came to Isaar, in Seymour township, and established a blacksmith shop, and here he has built up a large business in this line and that of the selling of farm implements. He has never aspired to public office, preferring to give his entire attention to the duties connected with his business. On June 29, 1896, Mr. Linsmeyer was married at Isaar, to Catherine Kroner, who was born in Seymour township, a daughter of John Kroner, an old pioneer settler of this part of Outagamie county. There have been no children.

LAWRENCE LUTZ, one of the proprietors of the largest ice business in Appleton, Wisconsin, which began in a small way and has steadily grown to its present large proportions, was born in 1860, in Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, a son of Lawrence and Fredericka (Bohne) Lutz, natives of Germany who came to this country when children. Lawrence Lutz the elder became a farmer in Kewaunee county, where he died January 16, 1909, and his widow still survives him and makes her home in Appleton. They had a family of seven children, as follows: Edward, who is engaged in farming in Calumet county; Lawrence; Sophia, who married Henry Koehne; Fred, who is residing in Kewaunee county; William, who is deceased; Ricke, who married August Becherich, a resident of Plymouth county; and Teresa, who married Edward Pfranz, of Edgar, Wisconsin. Edward Lutz came to Outagamie county in 1875, and here learned the blacksmith trade, later engaging in driving a team, and it was his glowing reports of the opportunities offered the ambitious young man in this section that persuaded Lawrence Lutz to locate in Outagamie county in 1877. In 1885 the brothers engaged in the ice business with Edward Weimer, and during the following year purchased his interests. The company now handles about 4,500 cords, or 15,000 tons of ice annually, employing eighteen men and using nine wagons, and the ice is cut from the pure spots of the Fox River and Lake Winnebago. In addition to doing the largest business of its kind in Appleton, the company engages to some extent in contracting, although the ice industry receives the most attention. Like other successful business ventures which have started in a small way, the success of this company may be traced to the persevering efforts of its proprietors and to the fact that they have gained the confidence of the community in their business integrity.

On May 27, 1882, Mr. Lutz was united in marriage with Hattie Graves, who was born in Waushara county, Wisconsin, daughter of R. H. Graves, and they have had two children: Orville, in business with his father; and Hazel, at home, both being graduates of the Appleton High School. The family is connected with the Congregational Church, and Mr. Lutz is a member of the Independent Order of Foresters, the Elks and the Harmony and Driving Clubs. He votes independently, and has never aspired to public office, preferring to give all of his time and attention to his business interests.

HERMAN GRAF, a progressive farmer and substantial citizen of Seymour township, who is engaged in extensive operations of an agricultural nature on a fine farm of eighty acres on section 3, was born March 2, 1876, in the town of Osborne, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Gottlieb and Johanna (Peots) Graf. Gottlieb Graf was born in Germany, and was there married to Wilhelmina Bauman, who died in the Fatherland, leaving four children: Carl, Wilhelmina, Augusta and Anna, and he was married a second time to Johanna Peots. To them there were born four children in Germany, William, Elbert and two who died in infancy, and six in the United States: Eliza, Bertha, Herman, Emma, Martha and Ida. In 1871 Gottlieb Graf came to the United States, and for four or five years followed the trade of mason in Osborne, but subsequently took up eighty acres of wild land in Osborne township. Later he purchased and cleared three forty-acre tracts, and engaged in agricultural operations until his death, December 19, 1905, when he was seventy-two years of age. Mrs. Graf still survives her husband, being now in her sixty-ninth year.

Herman Graf received his education in the district schools of Osborne township, and remained at home with his father, assisting him in the duties of the home farm. He accompanied his parents to Seymour township, and is now the owner of the original eighty-acre tract on which his father first settled on coming to this section. The farm is a fertile, well-kept property, which yields large crops, and Mr. Graf also engages extensively in fine stock raising. He was married in 1904 to Elma Sorensen, who was born June 6, 1884, a daughter of Nels and Mary Sorensen, residents of Shawnee county, Wisconsin, and to this union there have been born three children, namely: Raymond, born June 23, 1905; Harry, born November 26, 1907, and Mabel, born February 11, 1910.

ERNEST A. HUEBNER, a representative and highly esteemed citizen of Deer Creek township, who is engaged in the furniture and undertaking business in the village of Welcome, was born August 1, 1872, in Caledonia, Waupaca county, Wisconsin, and is a son of John and Fredericka (Habeck) Huebner, natives of Germany who immediately after their marriage came to America. They settled first in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for two years and then removed to Waupaca county, buying land and engaging in farming. John Huebner is still living at the age of eighty-four years and his wife has reached the age of seventy-nine. Mr. Huebner enlisted in the Union army in 1861, becoming a member of a regiment of Wisconsin Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. With the exception of a short time spent in the hospital when he was recovering from the effects of an injury that broke both of his legs, he was with his regiment during all of its service, and had a record of which any man might well be proud. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and is now living in the Soldiers' Home at Milwaukee, having signed all of his property, consisting of 360 acres of land in Waupaca county, to his wife and children. His wife makes her home with her son, John F. Huebner, on the old homestead. Ernest A. Huebner was the eleventh of a family of thirteen children, of whom nine are alive today, and he received a common school education. At the age of fourteen years he commenced working for wages on a farm, and one year later went to work for a butcher, with whom he remained about eighteen months. He then returned to the farm for two years, after which he engaged as a helper in a cheese factory, and a year later established a factory of his own in Liberty, Outagamie county. This was in the spring of 1893, and after four years he engaged in the same business at Shiocton, operating that factory until the spring of 1904. In the meantime he had acquired an interest in a farm implement business at Shiocton, and in 1904 he sold out his cheese and butter making business to devote his whole time to the implement business. During his partnership in this new venture, he traveled for one year for the International Harvester Company in Michigan and Wisconsin and then combined his implement business with his furniture and undertaking business, which had been founded by A. K. Dewick of Shiocton, the firm becoming Dewick & Huebner. Mr. Huebner resided in Shiocton until 1910, when the firm established a branch store at Welcome, and since that time he has continued at the latter place in charge of the branch. In 1892, Mr. Huebner was married to Miss Eva E. Spurgeon, born May 29, 1875, the eldest of the two children of George and Sarah (McClellan) Spurgeon, natives of Virginia and Ohio, respectively, who came to Wisconsin during the early days with their parents and were married in Dale townnship, Outagamie county. Mrs. Spurgeon died September 5, 1907, aged fifty-five years. Her husband, who still survives, is a veteran of the Civil War. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Huebner, namely: Evelyn and Eveline, twins, the former of whom died in infancy; and Isla. Mr. Huebner is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and is independent in politics. With his wife he attends the Methodist Episcopal Church of Welcome.

MICHAEL J.GAYHART, one of the enterprising and progressive young farmers of Outagamie county, who has spent his entire life in Grand Chute township, is now the owner of a fine farm of forty acres. He was born on the farm on which he now lives, April 14, 1880, and is a son of Michael and Elizabeth (Bohn) Gayhart, the former born in Tonawanda, New York, September 29, 1836, and the latter in Weisbach, Germany, September 29, 1833. Michael Gayhart was reared on a New York farm, and in 1854 came with his parents to Wisconsin, the family settling at Barton. In 1862 Mr. Gayhart came to Outagamie county, and after his marriage located in Appleton, where for about eight years he was engaged in teaming for a Mr. Finney. At the end of this period he opened a brickyard near the city, which he continued to operate for about fifteen years, and also engaged in farming in the summers and working in the woods winters at lumbering. He had previously purchased the farm in Grand Chute township that is now occupied by his son, Michael J., and here he farmed for one year, then renting it and removing to Split Rock, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in lumbering and operating a sawmill until 1891. In the latter year he returned to the farm, where he spent the balance of his life, dying December 30, 1899. He and his wife had a family of twelve children: Anna, the wife of William Aderman, in the lumber business at Appleton; Lizzie, wife of John Miller, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Caroline, wife of Michael Spielbauer, a member of the Appleton Fire Department; Minnie, wife of George Carter, a farmer of Paris, California,; Jennie, wife of Frank Merrit, a resident of Pasadena., California; Hattie, who is single and resides at home; Henry and Lena, who are deceased; Emma, wife of William Miller, a Grand Chute farmer; Laura, who is single and residing at home; Mary, wife of Ben Derby, a farmer of West Menasha; and Michael J.

Michael J. Gayhart attended the district schools of Grand Chute township, the district school at Split Rock and St. Joseph's school in Appleton. With the exception of a few winters spent in the woods, he has always resided on his present farm, of which he took charge at the time of his father's death. He now has forty acres under cultivation, and is carrying on general farming with great success. His land is finely cultivated and yields large crops, his buildings are modern and substantial, and his stock of good breed and well-fed appearance. Mr. Gayhart is a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and in politics he is a Democrat. He has never married.

ALBERT JEPSON, a progressive and enterprising agriculturist of Deer Creek township, who is the owner of a 200-acre tract lying in section 31, was born August 5, 1860, in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, the eldest of a family of four children. He remained on the home farm until he was thirty-two years of age, at which time he was married to Miss Margaret Dempsey, daughter of Martin and Mary (Doran) Dempsey, natives of Ireland. She was the sixth born of her parents' eight children, and was born December 4, 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Jepson have had nine children: Earl, Pearl, Milo, Rebecca, Edith, George, Hiram, Eben and Sylvester. After his marriage, Mr. Jepson remained for one year on the farm of his father, and at that time his parents retired and moved to Welcome. When his brother died, Mr. Jepson purchased the interests of the other heirs to the property, and he is now the sole owner of the 200 acres, of which 150 are cleared and under cultivation. The farm is one of the handsome properties of this locality, being neatly kept and well fenced with barbed and woven wire. Mr. Jepson has carried on general farming and stock raising, finds a ready sale in the markets for his dairy produce, hogs, cattle and sugar beets, and milks on an average of fifteen cows the year round, specializing in Holsteins. His hogs are of the Poland-China breed, while he has raised Percheron and Clyde horses and is now breeding the French Coach stock. Mr. Jepson is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Equitable Fraternal Union. He is a Republican in his political views, and has served eighteen months as chairman of the township board, as a member of the school board for a long period and as road commissioner four years. He and his family are consistent members of St. Mary's Catholic Church, of Welcome, Wisconsin.

LOUIS BONINI, JR., proprietor of the butchering establishment located at No. 702 College avenue, Appleton, Wisconsin, and one of this city's good, practical citizens, was born August 4, 1869, in Appleton, a son of Louis and Elizabeth (Hartung) Bonini, the former a native of Lucca, Italy, and the latter of Germany. They were married in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and early came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, settling in Appleton, where Mr. Bonini began to work at his trade of sawyer and filer. In 1876 he embarked in the butcher business, and he was so engaged until his retirement in 1900, and his death occurred seven years later. Mrs. Bonini still survives her husband and makes her home in Appleton. They had a family of six children, as follows: Mrs. S. F. Bartram; Mrs. Oliver Butler of Sedro Woolley, Skagit county, Washington; Celia; Louis, Jr.; John, who is deceased; and William, who is engaged in the grocery business in Appleton. Louis Bonini attended the public and high schools of Appleton, and learned the butcher business with his father, and at the time of the latter's retirement in 1900, he and his brother John started conducting the establishment, which Louis has been operating alone since the death of his brother. The business is still at the old stand, No. 702 College avenue, and in front of the building is standing an old tree, which Mr. Bonini has steadfastly refused to be allowed to be cut down. He has an excellent business in his part of the city, which under able management is increasing steadily. On June 15, 1899, Mr. Bonini was married to Augusta Heckert, a daughter of Herman Heckert, and they have had four children: John, Robert and Cecelia, and one child who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Bonini are members of the Episcopal Church. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Odd Fellows, the Eagles and the Fraternal Reserve Association.


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