Part 13 | History of Outagamie County, Wisconsin. Thomas Henry Ryan. Part 14 | Part 15

WILLIAM MERKL AND ALWIN F. BOEHME. One of the flourishing meat market enterprises of Appleton, Wisconsin, is that conducted by the firm of Merkl & Boehme, the members of which, William Merkl and Alwin F. Boehme, are enterprising and progressive business men. This business was originally established by Jacob Wolter, and later became the property of Daniel Neusbaum, who conducted it until 1903, in which year it was purchased by the present owners, who have developed it into a prosperous, well-patronized establishment, meat market and sausage factory. William Merkl, the senior partner of the firm, was born in Bohemia, November 18, 1872, and is a son of Florian and Annie Merkl, who are still living in the old country. He came to Appleton in 1891, having learned the trade of butcher in his native country, and in 1903 associated himself with Mr. Boehme. In 1899 he was married to Minnie Feldhoven, of Outagamie county, and they have two children, Florian and Willard. Mr. and Mrs. Merkl are members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and he is connected with St. Joseph's Society and the Catholic Knights. Alwin F. Boehme is a native of Germany, born February 15, 1875, a son, of Frank and Mary Boehme, who brought him to Appleton in 1892, his mother now being deceased, while his father still resides in this city. Mr. Boehme has always been engaged in the meat business, and well known to members of the trade. He was married in 1899 to Mary Ullrich, of Outagamie county, daughter of Justin Ullrich, a retired farmer of Appleton, and they are the parents of five children, as follows: Alvin, Mary, Clemmons, Theodore and Arthur. Mr. and Mrs. Boehme are also members of St. Joseph's Catholic congregation, and he holds membership in the Catholic Knights.

MARTIN COONEN, who during a long, useful and eventful life has been intimately associated with the agricultural, public and professional interests of Outagamie county, is now the owner of sixty-three acres in section 33, Buchanan township, and is not only known as a pioneer farmer and veterinary surgeon and as a public-spirited citizen who always has had the best interests of his community at heart, but is honored and respected as a veteran of the great Civil War. Born December 22, 1840, in Zeeland, Holland, Mr. Coonen is a son of James and Cornelia (Jacobs) Coonen, natives of Holland, where Jacob Coonen was the proprietor of a hotel and also owned a farm. In June, 1848, the family came to America, locating on a partly developed farm in Little Chute township, where Jacob Coonen's death occurred about 1855, when he was only forty-seven years of age. After his demise his widow took her family to Buchanan township, buying sixty-three acres of land where Martin Coonen now resides, and here her death occurred in 1882, when she was eighty-three years old, and her burial took place in Buchanan Cemetery, her husband having been interred in Little Chute. The early death of Martin Coonen's father caused him to go to work at an early age, and he was not much past fourteen years old when he started to employ himself at whatever honest occupation presented itself. He continued thus, principally at farming, until 1862, in which year he enlisted for service in the Union army, becoming a member of Company F, Fiftieth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with which organization he served until the close of the war. His regiment, starting from Camp Randall, went to St. Louis for ten days, went thence to Memphis, Tennessee, returned to St. Louis and marched through Missouri, visiting Jefferson City, Kansas City, St. Joseph and Waverly; proceeded to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, with the Third Cavalry, and two months later were sent to protect the settlers from the Indians, and it was while there that the war closed. The regiment, originally with Sherman's army, was detailed to scout duty, and shifted from one army to another. Mr. Coonen was finally mustered out in Madison, in June, 1866. After his return from the war, Mr. Coonen resumed farming operations on the old homestead, where he was married November 19, 1866, to Miss Johanna C. Verstegen, who was born June 29, 1849, daughter of Arnold and Anna Mary (Beeman) Verstegen, natives of Holland, who were married in that country and came to America in 1850, settling in Little Chute on a farm. The mother died in 1862, aged forty-two years, and the father passed away in 1900, at the age of eighty, and both are buried in Little Chute. They had a family of eleven children, of whom Mrs. Coonen was the fourth in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Coonen have had eleven children: the eldest, Mary Catherine, married Michael Whiteman, and died February 23, 1890, aged twenty-two years, leaving one child; and is buried in Buchanan Cemetery; James L., is married and living in Calumet county and has six children; George W., also married and living in Calumet county, has four children; John A. died in infancy; Annie M. married J. Beelen of Buchanan township, and has four children; Cornelia C., married Henry Van Abel of Kaukauna and has five children: Arnold A., who was married and had four children, resided in Taylor county until his death, which was caused by accident September 7, 1910, and he is buried in Buchanan township; John E. is single and a teacher in the Green Bay High school; Christina married George Vanderheiden and lives in Brown county and has three children; Franklin J. is married, lives in Kaukauna and has one child; and Nellie J. is single and living at home. Mr. Coonen has all of his land in a high state of cultivation, fenced with barbed and woven wire, and carries on general farming and stock raising, markets dairy products and rents his land on shares to his neighbors. He milks six cows and breeds high-grade Short Horn and Holstein cattle. For the past forty years he has been engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery, having been the first veterinary in this community, and his reputation in this line extends over a wide district. He is a popular comrade of the Grand Army Post, and his fellow townsmen have evidenced their esteem of his upright character and official ability by electing him to various township offices, including those of school director, member of the township board and chairman of the township. Mr. Coonen has seen and taken part in the various changes that have occurred in Buchanan township and his reminiscences of early days are particularly interesting. His personal adventures have been thrilling, and have not been confined to serving in the army and fighting the Indians. On August 12, 1862, while sailing between Sturgeon Bay and Green Bay, at eight o'clock a. m., the vessel on which Mr. Coonen and his companions were sailing foundered on the west side of the bay, and Mr. Coonen swam to the other shore, saving not only his own life but also that of a companion, although it took him fifteen hours to complete the ten miles. Mr. Coonen's religious connection is with the Roman Catholic Church, and he attends services at the Holy Angels congregation at Darboy.

FREDERICK SPEEL, a worthy representative of an old and honored family of Buchanan township, has been a resident of this community all of his life, having been born here May 6, 1868, and now resides on a farm of eighty-two acres located in sections 31 and 32. He is a son of William J. and Catherine (Benarde) Speel, the former a native of Holland and the latter of Luxembourg, Germany, who were married in this country and engaged in agricultural pursuits in Buchanan township until their retirement, which occurred about 1895. William J. Speel is about seventy-five years of age, while his wife, who also survives, has reached the age of sixty-six years. Frederick Speel was his parents' only child, and he always lived with them until their retirement. In about 1900 he bought forty acres in section 32, and in 1903 purchased a farm of 42 acres in section 31, which comprises the eighty-two acres which he now operates. He moved to this land in 1906, and now has sixty-five acres under the plow, all fenced with barbed wire. General farming has received his attention, and he markets dairy products, hogs and some grain, and finds a ready sale for the milk from ten cows. He keeps graded cattle and Chester White hogs. The house, a two-story, seven-room frame structure, is one of the handsome ones of this locality, and in 1907 Mr. Speel erected a barn 32x62 feet, in addition to which he has other substantial buildings for the shelter of his stock, grain and machinery. He is independent in his political views and has never cared for public office, but his father, who is a Democrat, has been a justice of the peace for many years, town clerk for about fifteen years, town treasurer for some time and a member of the school board for a long period. The family is connected with the Holy Angels Church of Darboy, Wisconsin. In July, 1897, Mr. Speel was united in marriage with Miss Susan Monyette, who was born March 22, 1871, daughter of George and Susan (Martinie) Monyette, natives of Germany, who were married in the old country, coming to America in the '60s and locating in Outagamie county. Mrs. Speel's father died when she was but a child and her mother was married again and now lives in this county at the age of seventy-nine years. Mr. and Mrs. Speel have had two children: Isabella E. and Henry W.

JOSEPH HEIDMANN, who during a residence of sixteen years in Buchanan township has become intimately acquainted with agricultural conditions and methods in this section, is the owner of sixty acres of land located in section 32. He was born in Watertown, Wisconsin, November 25, 1869, and is a son of John and Jane (Lynch) Heidmann. Joseph Heidmann was sixteen years of age when he began working for wages, and he so continued until he was twenty-one years old, at which time he began working for himself on rented property. After five years he bought the property on which he now lives, and here he has since been carrying on successful operations. Forty acres of the sixty are in an excellent state of cultivation, all fenced with barbed wire, and in addition to general farming raises dairy products, hogs and some grain for the market, although most of the hay and grain he feeds to his herd of six fine graded cows and his Poland China hogs. In 1906 he remodeled the house on the property and it now has eight rooms and is two stories in height. The barn, which was on the farm when he bought the property, has also been remodeled by Mr. Heidmann, and he put a basement under it and increased it to 34x54 feet. He is a good practical farmer and understands the value of scientific treatment of the soil, and the success of his ventures has proved his good management and knowledge of his chosen business. In politics he is a Democrat, and he and his family are members of the Kimberly Catholic Church. In February, 1892, Mr. Heidmann was married to Miss Elizabeth Pompa, daughter of Jacob and Lydia (Scouter) Pompa, natives of Holland, who were married in that country and came to America in August, 1873, settling first in Milwaukee for three years, after which they bought five acres of land in Buchanan township and here resided until Mr. Pompa's death in 1899 when fifty-seven years old. In the meantime he had acquired forty acres, and after his death his wife sold the property and built a small house in this township, where she now lives at the age of sixty-nine years. Mrs. Heidmann was the third of a family of sixteen children, six of whom are now living, and was born March 21, 1869. Mr. and Mrs. Heidmann have been the parents of six children: John; James and Bertha, twins; Marie, Adeline and Benjamin.

DANIEL J. RYAN, chairman of the board of supervisors of Buchanan township, and one of the leading citizens of his section, has been actively identified with the agricultural interests of Outagamie county for the past fifteen years, and is now the owner of 109 acres of good farming land situated in sections 24 and 25. Mr. Ryan was born February 12, 1862, in Outagamie county, and is a son of Daniel and Winifred (Powers) Ryan, natives of Ireland who were married in Massachusetts and came to Wisconsin about 1858. They first settled on eighty acres of land, a part of which is included in Mr. Ryan's present property, at that time a wild tract of timber land, and Daniel Ryan began to clear this property, building a one-story log house, 12x16 feet, with two half windows and one door, the timber for which he hewed himself. A few months later he purchased a team of oxen for which he built a small log stable, and shortly afterwards bought a cow, gradually adding to his stock of farm implements as he could afford them. About 1864 Mr. Ryan built the house in which Daniel J. Ryan is now living, the first frame house in the township of Buchanan, and about the same time erected a frame barn 32x50 feet, shingled with split shingles, some of which still remain in a good state of preservation. The lumber for these buildings was ripped by a small sawmill about two miles east of the Ryan homestead. In 1893 Daniel Ryan built a frame house on a piece of land adjoining the home farm, and there he lived during his remaining years, passing away in February, 1906, while his wife died October 16, 1903. Both are buried at St. Mary's Cemetery in South Kaukauna. Although Daniel Ryan was very well known, and an influential man in his community, he devoted all of his time to his farming interests and never aspired to public preferment. Daniel J. Ryan was the third of a family of eight children, and he remained at home with his parents until he was twenty-two years old, at which time he went to the State of Washington, where for one year he worked for wages. He then went to California, and during the next twelve years he was engaged in raising wheat, rye and barley on 2,500 acres of rented land. In 1897 he returned to Outagamie county, and since that time has resided on the old homestead in Buchanan township, a part of which he inherited and a part being purchased. He engages in general farming, markets dairy products, hogs and cattle and some poultry, and feeds his hay and grain. He milks on an average of eleven cows, and at present has a fine, well-fed herd of grades, and he is also breeding to Belgian horses. He is at present remodeling his house and barn, and has eighty acres under the plow, his property being fenced with barbed and woven wire. In political matters he is a Democrat, but in local matters is inclined to vote independently, and he is at present chairman of the board of supervisors of Buchanan township and has been a member of the school board for nine years. He and his family are members of the Holy Angels Catholic Church of Darboy.

In October, 1887, Mr. Ryan was married to Miss Catherine Gleason, who was born June 29, 1865, the fifth of the family of ten children born to Dennis and Catherine (Shinners) Gleason, natives of Ireland, who spent their lives in the old country. Mrs. Ryan came to the United States at the age of eighteen years, and they met and were married in California. They have had six children: Daniel T., a telegraph operator of San Francisco; Catherine I., who graduated from the Kaukauna High school in 1907, since which time she has been engaged in school teaching; William D., a graduate of the Kaukauna High school class of 1909, now assisting his father on the home farm; Winifred M., who graduated from the same institution in 1910 and is now living at home; Edward J., a student in the schools; and Mary E., who is now two years old.

JOHN PALMBACH, one of the representative farmers of Greenville township, who is carrying on extensive operations on 110 acres of fine farming land, was born at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, July 26, 1857, and is a son of Michael and Barbara (Schultz) Palmbach, the former born in Wittenberg and the latter in Byrne, Germany. Mr. Palmbach's parents came to the United States in 1852, settling in Milwaukee, where Michael Palmbach worked for others for six years and then came to Greenville township and purchased a tract of wild timber land. The remainder of his life was spent in clearing and cultivating this farm, and he died August 20, 1893, his widow surviving him until April 20, 1898. Mr. Palmbach served eight years in the German army prior to coming to this country. He and his wife had five children, as follows: William, practically retired, who is living at Potato Point, two miles east of Appleton; Andrew, retired from business and now living at No. 855 Superior street, Appleton; John; Caroline, deceased, who was the wife of John Schoettler of Grand Chute township; and August, residing on a farm adjoining that of his brother. John Palmbach attended school in Greenville township, and was reared to agricultural pursuits, working for his parents until he was about twenty-eight years of age, at which time he moved to forty acres of land which he had purchased some time before. He began farming on his own account on this tract, to which he later added seventy acres, and he now carries on general farming and has his land in a high state of cultivation. He also has other interests owning stock in several oil companies. On Septermber 26, 1889, Mr. Palmbach was married to Sophia Nieman, who was born in Greenville township, daughter of Christian and Sophia (Schroeder) Nieman, natives of Germany, and six children have been born to this union, namely: Leonard R., born August 10, 1890; Elsie B., born June 7, 1892; George A., born February 15, 1894; Rose L. B., born February 14, 1897; John C., born April 5, 1899; and Leona L., born July 16, 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Palmbach are members of the Lutheran Church, and he also holds membership in the Lutheran Aid Association, of Appleton.

WILLIAM MENNING, one of the leading agriculturists of Greenville township, was born August 18, 1871, on the farm which he is now operating and is a son of John and Dorothy (Nagel) Menning. John Menning was born in Germany and came to the United States with his parents, who first settled in the State of New York, and resided there for about ten years. They came to Outagamie county and settled on the Greenville township property, which John Menning was engaged in operating till 1903, when he moved to Neenah, where he lived up to the time of his death January 13, 1905; his widow is now residing in Neenah, having attained the age of seventy-four years. She was born in Germany, and was married to Mr. Menning in New York. They had twelve children of which nine are now living. William Menning received his education in the neighboring district school and has always been living on the home farm, which he purchased in 1903. Mr. Menning has made a number of improvements since he has taken charge of the property and is carrying on farming along practical lines. He is also interested in the breeding of fine stock, owns some prize winning animals, and is a stockholder in the Appleton Fair Association. He was one of the organizers of the Appleton Hail and Cyclone Insurance Company and during the past three years has acted in the capacity of president. In 1899, Mr. Menning was married to Miss Helen Schaefer, of Clayton, Winnebago county, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Schaefer, who were among the first settlers in that town. Mrs. Menning is a graduate of Ryan High School, of Appleton, and a member of the Congregational Church of that city. Mr. and Mrs. Menning are prominent workers in the Grange of which they both are members. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Menning: Marie, Harriet, Wilma, Raymond, Helen and Janet.

JAMES MURRAY, who was born August 16, 1846, in County Armagh, Ireland, and is now living on 160 acres of farming land situated in sections 15, 16 and 10, Maple Creek township, is one of Outagamie county's good, practical agriculturists. His parents, John and Mary Murray, emigrated to Canada about 1853, and there spent the remainder of their lives. Of their family of twelve children, James Murray was the youngest, and at the age of sixteen years he learned the trade of blacksmith, which he followed in the Dominion until the fall of 1865. At this time he came to New London, Wisconsin, where he worked at his trade for upwards of twenty years, and in 1887 moved to the property on which he now resides, which at that time consisted of 120 acres, part of which he had purchased in 1875 and part in 1882. There had been a few improvements made on this property, including some acres cleared and a log cabin built, and since that time Mr. Murray has added forty acres, and has 130 acres of his land under cultivation, and his land entirely fenced with barbed wire. He built a barn 30x30 feet in 1889, and in 1892 erected another 30x64 feet, while three years later he put up his residence of eleven rooms. In addition, he has erected a number of other buildings for the shelter of stock, grain and machinery, and has two flowing wells of pure water, which provides an ample supply the year around. Mr. Murray is engaged in farming and stock raising, markets dairy products, hogs and cattle, and feeds his hay and grain. He has mixed breeds of cattle of high grade, full-blooded Poland-China hogs and Percheron horses. In 1868 Mr. Murray was married to Miss Margaret Heffernan, born in March, 1846, the youngest of the three children of James and Ann (Hennebery) Heffernan, natives of Ireland who emigrated to Canada about 1853. Mr. Heffernan died in New London, while living with Mr. and Mrs. Murray, while his wife passed away in Detroit, Michigan, while at the home of her daughter. Mrs. Murray died July 8, 1908,.having been the mother of eight children. The eldest, Mary Ann, died in childhood; Edward J. married and living in Waupaca county, has five children; Elizabeth J. married J. H. Conroy and lives in Waupaca county; William B. married and living in Ashland, Wisconsin, having one child; John J. is married and lives in the State of Washington, having two children; Charles A. is married and lives in Deer Creek township, having four children; Ellen T. married Hugh Carew, and lives in Waupaca county, the mother of three children; and Francis T. is married and lives in Maple Creek township, having four children. Mr. Murray is a member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to New London Lodge No. 131 and to Royal Arch Chapter No. 62, New London. He is a Democrat in politics, served as town clerk five years, was twenty years school clerk, served as the first alderman of the Fourth Ward of New London when the city was incorporated, continuing in the office five years, and during 1883 and 1884 was mayor of the city. He and his family are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church of Welcome, W\isconsin.

WILLIAM J. CONLON, born December 14, 1873, in New London, Waupaca county, Wisconsin, and now living on 180 acres of good farming land in section 24, Deer Creek township, Outagamie county, is a son of Michael and Margaret (Cooney) Conlon, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of the State of Indiana. They were married in New London, Wisconsin, whence the father had come when twenty-six years of age, Mrs. Conlon having come here in the early days with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Conlon lived in New London until 1895 when they bought the place now operated by William J. Conlon, but in 1901 they returned to New London, where they still reside, the father being seventy-two years of age and the mother fifty-six. With the exception of the six years spent in Deer Creek township, Mr. Conlon was in the employ of the railroad company at New London during his residence in this country. William J. Conlon was the eldest of his parents' nine children, and he remained at home with his parents, taking charge of the Deer Creek farm in 1901, in which year he was married to Mary A. McGlone, daughter of Patrick and Ellen (McMyler) McGlone, and born February 11, 1879. Six children have been born to this union: Margaret, Mary, William, Alice, Edward and Richard. Ever since his marriage Mr. Conlon has continued to reside on this farm, and he now has seventy acres cleared and under cultivation and all fenced with barbed wire. He does general farming, markets dairy products, hogs and cattle, feeds his grain and hay, and raises Durham cattle, Poland-China hogs and Percheron horses. He built his modern frame house of eight rooms, 16x24 and 16x26 feet, in 1899, and the barn, which was one of the buildings on the place at the time of its purchase is a structure 30x50 feet. Mr. Conlon is a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters and of the Fraternal Reserve Association. He is a Republican in politics and is now chairman of the township board of supervisors, and has served four previous terms on the board, during two of which he was chairman. He and the members of his family are consistent attendants of the Catholic Church of Helena, a mission of St. Mary's Catholic Church of Welcome.

HENRY GROSSMAN, one of the leading agriculturists of Dale township, who owns eighty acres of valuable land in section 23 and a finely cultivated tract of twenty acres located in section 14, was born in Dale township, March 12, 1858, and is a son of August and Louisa (Herbst) Grossman, natives of Kensbaugh and Mecklenburg, Germany, respectively. The parents of Mr. Grossman came to this country as young people and were married in Appleton, shortly after which they came to Dale township, where Mr. Grossman purchased 120 acres of raw land. After he had built a log house, 16x24 feet and a log barn, Mr. Grossman settled down to clear his land, and he later added forty acres to his original purchase, having at the time of his retirement, in 1897, seventy acres of the 160 under cultivation. He died in Dale in 1908, aged eighty-seven years, and his widow still survives and resides in that place. Mr. Grossman enlisted in Company A, Forty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers; in 1865, and his burial was conducted by the Grand Army of the Republic. Henry Grossman was the eldest of his parents' eight children and he remained at home until he was twenty-one years of age, after which he worked at the mason trade for fifteen years. In 1897 he bought the old homestead from his father and continued to operate it until 1905, when he purchased the farm which he now cultivates. In 1884 Mr. Grossman was married to Annie Dorshner, who was born July 18, 1865, daughter of Anton and Catherine Dorshner, natives of Austria, who were married in that country and came to the United States in 1865, settling in Dale township, where Dorshner died in 1901, aged sixty-five years, his widow still surviving. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Grossman: Lorena, who married Charles Wischow, of Dale township, and has two children; and Harriet and Palmer, residing at home. Mr. Grossman is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and is a Democrat in politics. His religious connection is with the Reform Church of Dale. He engages in general farming and markets dairy products, hogs and potatoes and feeds his hay and grain. He has a number of good substantial buildings on his property, including a basement barn, 35x70 feet, built in 1907.

LOUIS ULLMER, who owns and operates a tract of 120 acres in section 2 and another property of sixty acres in section 3, Seymour township, is one of the leading agriculturists of this section. His birth occurred December 28, 1876, in Brown county, Wisconsin, and he is a son of Joseph and Mary (Reinhardt) Ullmer. When Joseph Ullmer was three years old his father died, and when he was but fifteen years old he left his native country, Germany, coming to the United States, where he spent the remainder of his life at the blacksmith trade and in farming in Brown county, Wisconsin, his death occurring in 1910, when he was fifty-seven years of age. His widow survives him, being fifty-five years old, and has been the mother of these children: Louis, Henry, Joseph, William, August, Charles, Leo, Mathias, Lawrence, Emily, Louisa, Mary, Clara and Cecil, of whom August is deceased. Louis Ullmer was educated in the district schools of Brown county, and as a youth learned the blacksmith trade with his father, an occupation which he followed for five or six years, and when twenty-six years of age he began farming in Brown county. In 1907 he came to Seymour township, where he has since made his home, being engaged in general and dairy farming, and having a large nine-room house, and two dairy barns, 40x70 and 40x60 feet respectively. Mr. Ullmer has devoted much attention to the raising of fine dairy cattle and Percheron horses, and he is also an extensive breeder of hogs. His farming interests .have demanded all of his time and attention and he has never aspired to public office. In 1902, Mr. Ullmer was married to Anna Boehm, who was born in Bohmem, Germany, August 16, 1881, daughter of Frank and Anna (Meyers) Boehm, who still reside in Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Boehm had these children: Anton, who died in America; Katie; Anna, Mrs. Ullmer, who came to the United States when she was sixteen years old; Frank, in Germany; Theresa, living in this country; Louisa, in Germany; and Frances, Katie and Wolf, who came to America in 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Ullmer have had five children, namely: Marcella Florence, born March 3, 1903; Raphael, born June 9, 1904; Matilda, who died November 4, 1906, aged seventeen months; Bernard, who was born February 8, 1908; and Gertrude, born February 3, 1910.

MARX A. LEMKE, of the city of Kaukauna, was born in Brown county, Wisconsin, September 10, 1858. William and Caroline (Schroeder) Lemke, his parents, came with their four children, Charles, August, Elvina and Minnie, to America in 1858, and for about six years resided on a farm near Milwaukee. They then moved to Brown county, this state, where William Lemke died in 1874, aged fifty-nine years, and Mrs. Lemke in 1901, at eighty-five years of age. Martin A. Lemke received a limited education in the public schools of his native county, and in 1891 came to Kaukauna and purchased the American House. Previous to this, in 1882, he married Bertha Rahn, daughter of Julius Rahn who came to the United States and located near Milwaukee where Mrs. Lemke was born. For seven years Mr. Lemke operated the American House and made it one of the noted and popular hostelries of Wisconsin, then leased the property to others. In the meanwhile he purchased what is now known as the "Lemke Farm" and has since devoted his time and attention to agricultural pursuits. In 1898 he built the Oakgrove cheese factory which was removed when he disposed of it in 1910. In 1902 he built a second cheese factory known as the "Lemke No. 2" which he sold in 1905. In 1898 he took up his residence on the farm and there lived until returning to Kaukauna in 1905. When Mr. Lemke bought his farm it had little beyond the ordinary, but under his wise management it has been brought to a high state of improvement and is considered one of the best in the county. To Mr. and Mrs. Lemke eight children have been born; Walter, dying in infancy; Antone, Elma, Arthur, Hugo, Viola, Laura and Elvera. Lemke is one of the progressive and enterprising men of the county. He served on the county board three years, as school director one year, and he and wife are members of the German Lutheran Church.

EDMOND J. CANCE, one of the prominent farmers and extensive landowners of Bovina township, who has a magnificent property of 470 acres in sections 10 and 15, was born September 15, 1877, in Ettrick, Trempealeau county, Wisconsin, son of Alexander and Agnes (Edmond) Cance, natives of Scotland. Alexander Cance came to the United States with his brothers, and at an early day settled in Trempealeau county, while his wife came to America with her parents, settling first in Canada and moving thence to Minnesota, in which State Mr. and Mrs. Cance were married. They settled in Trempealeau county on a farm, where Mr. Cance carried on farming until 1896, in which year they moved to Outagamie county, and in 1906 retired and went to Shiocton, where both are now living. They had a family of six children, Edmond J. being the third in order of birth. He received a common school education and lived at home with his parents until his marriage, in September, 1906, to Miss Alma McNiesh, who was born March 31, 1885, the youngest of the six children of Thomas and Mary McNiesh, natives of Ontario, Canada. Mr. and Mrs. McNiesh came to the United States as young people and were married in Appleton, Wisconsin, after which they began farming, an occupation which they carried on throughout their lives. Mr. McNiesh died in 1910, aged fifty-nine years, and his widow survived him but six months, she being but fifty-four years old at the time of her death, and both were buried in Black Creek. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cance: Agnes E. and Hervon G.

After marriage, Mr. Cance rented the farm which he now operates, and in 1910 he purchased the property from his father. This excellent tract, which is completely fenced with woven and barbed wire, has 325 acres under cultivation, and is equipped with a fine modern residence, built by Alexander Cance, good outbuildings and a substantial barn, the latter of which will be remodeled by Cance during this summer. He engages in general farming and stockraising, keeping Short Horn cattle, Poland-China hogs and Shropshire sheep, and he specializes in cabbages and dairy products. Mr. Cance is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and is a Republican in politics. He has been much interested in the cause of education, and is now serving as clerk of the Shiocton high school and treasurer of the district school board. He and Mrs. Cance are members of the Congregational Church of Shiocton.

EDWARD O'KEEFE, who is president of the firm of O'Keefe-Orbison Engineering and Construction Company, contractors, constructors and engineers, and the largest firm in its line in Wisconsin, was born at Green Bay, Wisconsin, in 1855, and is a son of Thomas and Mary (Hanrahan) O'Keefe. Thomas O'Keefe was born in County Limerick, Ireland, in December, 1817.

Edward O'Keefe received his preliminary education in the public schools of Appleton and Green Bay, and later attended Lawrence College for two years, after leaving which he engaged in mill work, which he continued until 1882, at which time Mr. O'Keefe formed a partnership with Thomas W. Orbison. This company, which does contracting, constructing and engineering has erected most of the mills on the Fox River, but has not confined its operations to this section of the country, as large construction contracts have been accepted as far away as the State of Maine. The firm enjoys a reputation that is second to none in the country, and the partners are especially well known as consulting engineers on hydraulic work.

In 1882, Mr. O'Keefe was married to Mary Hart, of Appleton; daughter of Warren Hart, an early settler of this part of Outagamie county, and five children have been born to this union. The family are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church. In politics, Mr. O'Keefe is an ardent Democrat, but he has found little time to engage in matters of a public nature.

REV. JOHN FAVILLE, who, as pastor of the Congregational Church at Appleton, Wisconsin, became widely known through this city both for his spiritual helpfulness as well as for the executive ability that brought about, within two years, the replacing of the small structure of the congregation by an edifice that ranks with the leading ones of the place. In a wider field Mr. Faville is equally well known. He was the originator, with his brother, Rev. Henry Faville of the Young Men's Sunday Evening Club, an organization which claims membership in every State in the Union. So important and far reaching had become the work of this organization as far back as the World's Fair Congress, that Mr. Faville was requested to address this great body on this subject.

John Faville was born in Jefferson County, Wisconsin, July 7, 1847, a son of Elijah and Eliza (Ostrom) Faville, the former of whom was a native of Herkimer county, New York, and the latter of Wayne county. They were parents of three sons: John and Henry, twins, and Rush E. The older sons both entered the ministry but the youngest adopted agriculture as his business. John Faville attended school at Milford, Jefferson county, later was a student at Lake Mills and subsequently at Lawrence University, where he was graduated in 1871. On leaving his alma mater he became principal of the Milford schools, and one year later accepted the same position at Two Rivers. In 1873 he entered the Theological department of the Boston University, where he was graduated in 1876, and his first charge was the Cotton Street M. E. Church at Fond du Lac, Wisconsin. In the following year he was assigned to the M. E. Church at Fox Lake, where he officiated also as supply pastor for the Congregational body. Later he was transferred to Waupun and from there returned to Fond du Lac, Division Street Methodist Episcopal Church, and three years later accepted the urgent invitation of the Congregational Church at Appleton, with the result above noted. After a pastorate of thirteen years at Appleton, he accepted a call to the First Congregational Church of Peoria, Illinois. After a pastorate of nine years at Peoria he was recalled by the church at Appleton, Wisconsin, where he is now in his fourth year of service. Some of Mr. Faville's public service aside from the ministry has been as a trustee of Lawrence University, of Milwaukee Downer and Northland Colleges, as president of the Anti-Saloon League of Wisconsin and director in the League in Illinois; as contributing editor of "Unity" and director in the Congress of Religions; and as moderator of both the Wisconsin and Illinois Congregational Associations. He has been also a temperance and general lecturer and so great a factor has he been in the ranks of the Prohibition party that in the fall of 1894 he was chosen as that party's candidate for Congress. For years he has written for the press and in every direction his influence has been beneficial and uplifting.

Rev. John Faville was married October 26, 1876, to Miss Louise G. Thayer, a daughter of Henry and Mary A. (Kelly) Thayer, of Massachusetts ancestry. Mr. and Mrs. Faville have two sons and one daughter: Henry T. (deceased); Mildred and John, Jr.

JOHN VAN DEN BOSCH, a prominent and influential citizen and large land owner of Freedom township, where he has been engaged in agricultural pursuits during a long and active career, is now residing on Kaukauna Rural Route No. 12. He is a son of Henry Van Den Bosch, a native of Holland, who came to the United States in 1868 with his wife, Mary, and their son John, and settled in Outagamie county. Henry Van Den Bosch first purchased a tract of forty acres of wild land in Freedom township, which he cleared and cultivated, later adding eighty acres and subsequently twenty acres of land which he made into one of the finest farms in Freedom township. The first family home was a log house, which is still standing on the property, testifying to the excellence of the workmanship of the one who built it, although a fine modern house and large barns have since been erected on the property by John Van Den Bosch, who was born in Holland May 7, 1860. He received his education in his native country and the district schools of Freedom township, and always worked on the home farm, which he inherited at the time of his father's death, January 12, 1906. Since that time he has added eighty acres to the farm through purchase. He is still actively engaged in tilling the soil, although he met with an unfortunate accident in 1910, when he lost his left hand in a corn husker which he was operating. He is an intelligent, practical farmer and operates his land along scientific lines, paying attention to crop rotation and turning out large crops. In 1888 he was married to Wilhelmina Vervort, who was born in Holland in 1868, daughter of Peter Vervort, and six children have been born to this union, namely: Henry, born September 16, 1892; Mathias, born August 20, 1895; Frank, born December 22, 1897; Mary, born November 20, 1900; Peter, born May 5, 1905; and Nellie, born December 11, 1906. Mr. and Mrs. Van Den Bosch are consistent members of St. Nicholas Catholic Church of Freedom.

BERT KUMROW, a well-known resident of Freedom township, Outagamie county, who is engaged in general farming and dairying in section 5, was born September 1, 1866, on his present farm, a son of Herman Kumrow. Herman Kumrow was born in Prussia, Germany, and was engaged in work in his father's mill in that country until coming to the United States at the age of twenty-six years, when he located at once in Milwaukee. While there he was married to Johannah Zeckart, who was born in Germany and was left an orphan at eleven years of age, and they came to Outagamie county about 1860, buying a farm which forms a part, of the present homestead. The land at that time was covered with timber, but after building a log house, Mr. Kumrow started to clear his property, and as he put it under cultivation he added to his acreage from time to time and made improvements in the buildings. He enlisted in the Northern army during the Civil War, but at the beginning of his term of service was taken seriously ill and was sent back home, his sickness lasting for several years. He served his township as school director and treasurer for a number of years and was a well known and prominent citizen. Bert Kumrow was one of a family of seven children, and his education was secured in the district schools and the German school of his neighborhood. He worked on his father's farm until he was nineteen years of age when he went to Beloit, Wisconsin, where he spent two years working for farmers, and then spent a like period among the farmers in the vicinity of Rockford, Illinois. He then went to Ashland, Wisconsin, where for about five months he was employed in the Superior Saw Mill, and when about twenty-three years old he returned to the home farm and for about two years spent his time alternately on the home farm and among the neighboring agriculturists. When he had reached the age of twenty-five years he and his brother Albert bought the home farm and their father retired and with his wife lived with the boys for one year, then going to Duluth, Minnesota. After one and one-half years, however, owing to the severe winters there, they returned to Wisconsin and bought a home in Appleton where they have since resided, Mr. Kumrow celebrating his eighty-first birthday March 18, 1911, and his wife being eighty years old August 10, of that year. The same year that the father went to Duluth, Albert Kumrow was married and Bert lived with him and his wife for eight years, at the end of which time he bought the farm and has since been conducting it. He married Anne Feitense, daughter of John Feitense of Shawano county, and three children have been born to this union: Alma, born January 27, 1901; Meta, born May 13, 1902; and Raymond, born July 2, 1905. Mr. and Mrs. Kumrow are connected with the Moravian Church of Freedom. Mr. Kumrow is engaged in general farming, dairying and stock raising and has been very successful in his operations. His farm is one of the good ones of his locality and its general appearance denotes the presence of excellent management.

NICHOLAS KEIFFER, one of the old and honored residents of Freedom township, and a veteran of the Civil War, in which he served for more than three years, has been prominently identified with the agricultural interests of Outagamie county for a long period. He is a son of John Keiffer, who was born in Luxemburg, Germany, a grist miller by occupation, whose only residence in the United States was for two months during the year 1880, when with his wife, Clara Keiffer, he paid a visit to his son Nicholas. The latter was also born in Germany and came to the United States in 1857, when twenty years of age. He first located in New York State. where he spent two months, and then went to Illinois and worked by the month for several years on farms. He then returned to New York State, having made up his mind to return to the Fatherland, but while there learned that two of his sisters had come to Wisconsin, and eventually he came to this state and settled in Green county. The Civil War breaking out while he was there, in 1861 he enlisted in the Thirteenth Wisconsin Infantry, and served three years and three months with that organization as a private, and after a brave and meritorious service returned to Green county. He remained there only three days, however, when he went to Port Washington, where his sisters resided, and while there, in 1865, was married to Miss Mary Green, born in 1846, daughter of John and Anne Green, natives of Germany who settled at Port Washington, but eventually located in Outagamie county. After his marriage Mr. Keiffer returned to Green county, where he farmed for four vears, anld then came to Outagamie county and rented land for a time. He was eventually able to purchase four acres of land in Freedom township, on which he lived for two years, then purchasing a tract of forty acres, which he cultivated for a period of ten years. He added to his holdings from time to time, and became a large land holder for this part of the country. In 1901 Mr. Keiffer bought his present farm and built a cozy farm house and adequate barns, and here he expects to pass his remaining years. Mr. and Mrs. Keiffer have had fourteen children, of whom three are deceased, namely: Clara, Margaretta and Leo. The survivors are: John, Lena, Annie, Walter, William, Mary, Susan, Rosa, Nicholas, Peter and Henry. The family is connected with the St. Nicholas Church of Freedom. Keiffer was supervisor of the township for one year, but refused reelection when he found he had spent twenty-five dollars over his salary while giving his services.

FRANK KRESSIN, one of Outagamie county's successful self-made men, who has risen to a place of prominence among the agriculturists of Freedom township, is now operating a fine farm in section 32. He is a native of the Fatherland, born February 18, 1856, a son of Herman and Caroline Kressin. Herman Kressin was born February 20, 1834, in Germany, and was there married to Caroline ------------, who was born March 19, 1833, in that country. The family came to the United States in 1870, it then consisting of the parents and the following children: Frank, Herman, Albert, Otto, Edward and Amelia, of whom Otto is now deceased. The family settled in Freedom township, where Mr. Kressin purchased land, and resided there until 1902, when he retired and removed to Appleton, but six years later returned to Frank Kressin's farm, and one year later, in October, 1909, he died, aged seventy-five years. His widow, who survives him and makes her home with her son Frank, is seventy-nine years old. Frank Kressin was fourteen years of age when he accompanied the other members of his family to this country, and his education was all secured in the schools of his native country, he having no chance to take advantage of educational opportunities after coming to the United States, as his services were needed continually on the home farm. His youth and young manhood were spent on the homestead with his parents, but at the age of twenty-five years he left home and began to work as a carpenter in the service of the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, continuing with that organization for a period covering seventeen years, living in Appleton during that time. In 1890 he was married to Ida Schultz, daughter of Gustave and Augusta Schultz, natives of Germany who came to the United States in 1866 and settled in Freedom township, where Mrs. Kressin was born August 29, 1872. In 1898 Mr. Kressin moved with his family to a farm in Freedom township, about a mile and one-half from the village of Freedom, and resided on that property for ten years, but in 1908 sold that tract and purchased his present property in section 32. He carries on general farming, raising good cattle and marketing dairy products. His buildings are in an excellent state of repair, his land is neatly fenced, and the whole property presents a neat and prosperous appearance. Mr. and Mrs. Kressin are members of the German Lutheran Church of Freedom. They have had three children: Alfred, born January 3, 1897; William, born July 31, 1900, and Linda, born April 13, 1905.

EDWARD H. VOGEL, a sterling citizen and prosperous farmer of Ellington township, who is the owner of a good farming property in Ellington township, is a son of Herman L. Vogel, a native of Prussia, who came to the United States in 1867, settling in the State of Illinois for one year and then going to Greenville township, Outagamie county, for a like period. At that time he bought land in Ellington township, on which he was engaged in farming until his death in 1909. Mr. Vogel married Johanna Lohrenze, also a native of Prussia, who came to America with her parents, and she died in 1890, having been the mother of ten children, as follows: Gustave, Charles, Matilda, Amelia, Mata, Edward H., Helen, Herman, Albert and Walter. Edward H. Vogel received his education in the district schools of Ellington township and the Ryan High School in Appleton, and after leaving the latter began to work by the month on farms, and for two years was in the employ of the Northwestern Railroad. He also worked at carpentering and followed whatever honest occupation presented itself, being industrious and enterprising and always a faithful workman. In 1902 he had accumulated enough to buy the farm of his father in Ellington township, but after working this for five years he sold that property and bought his present tract, which he has brought into a high state of cultivation. He has made numerous improvements on the property, and now stands high among the agriculturists of his township. Mr. Vogel's marriage occurred in 1902, in which year he was united with Myrtle Farnam, who was born on the farm on which she now lives, November 5, 1879, and is a daughter of Eliab and Amelia (Grunert) Farnam, old residents of Ellington township. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Vogel: Esther, Ruth and Glen. They attend the Methodist Episcopal Church of Stephensville, and Mr. Vogel is serving as school treasurer of his district. He is a Republican in politics.

WILLIAM LAIRD, who is engaged in general farming in Ellington township, is a worthy representative of one of Outagamie county's pioneer families. He is a son of Alexander Laird, who was born in Ireland in 1840, and came to the United States in 1857, locating in Ellington township, where he has continued to reside ever since, with the exception of a period when he returned to the old country to marry Agnes Jamison. They had a family of seven children. William Laird was born August 12, 1873, on his father's farm in Ellington township, and he first attended the district schools of this locality. Later he went to the Appleton high school for some time and later took the agricultural course in the University of Wisconsin. He worked on his father's farm until his marriage, in 1901, to Zella Sykes, who was born in Appleton, Wisconsin, daughter of William and Sarah Sykes, the former a native of New York State and the latter of Appleton. Some time prior to his marriage, Mr. Laird had purchased his present farm, formerly known as the Hunter farm, and this he has brought up to a high state of cultivation, by intelligently using scientific methods. He does mixed and dairy farming, keeping a number of purebred Holstein cattle, and his product meets with a ready sale in the markets of this section. Since locating on this property, Laird has erected a fine, modern residence and substantial barns and outbuildings, and has improved it in many other ways, making it one of the fine farms of this section. Mr. Laird is independent in his political views, voting for the man rather than the party. He is a great advocate of education, and has been connected with educational matters here for some time, serving as treasurer of the school district for four years. He and Mrs. Laird are consistent members of the Congregational Church of Ellington. They have four children: Margaret, Dorothy, Grace and Katherine.

CHARLES BREITRICK, who is engaged in cultivating the old Breitrick homestead in Ellington township, is one of the scientific and practical farmers of this part of Outagamie county who has an intimate knowledge of agricultural conditions, He was born in Ellington, Wisconsin, in 1864, and is a son of Karl William and Wilhelmina Herman, and a grandson of Andrew Breitrick, a farmer of Saxony, Prussia, where he spent all of his life. He married Rosa Kroshaus, and they had a family of eight children, of whom Karl William was born April 24, 1822. He received his education in his native country, was reared to the life of an agriculturist, and entered the German army at the age of twenty years. At the expiration of his term of service he returned to his home and settled up the estate of his parents, and then sailed for the United States on the "Alexander Edmond," being on the water for fifty-six days. On arriving in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, he was married to Wilhelmina Herman, who was born in Prussia and came to this country on the same boat with him, and after a short time there removed to New London, but after a season there went to Greenville township and took up 160 acres of land. Five years later he sold out and moved to Ellington township, where he continued to engage in farming until his death, April 23, 1891, his wife having passed away March 27, 1880. They had a family of five children: Albert; Minnie, who married F. E. Saecker of Appleton; Rosa, who married Charles H. Mory of Cicero township; Carrie; and Charles. Charles Breitrick was educated in the public schools of Ellington township, and has always resided on the farm which he is now cultivating. Early in life he was taught to cultivate the traits of thrift and industry, and these, together with an intimate knowledge of agricultural conditions here, have made his ventures a success. On March 17, 1897, Mr. Breitrick was married to Estelle Louisa Taggart, of Kaukauna, and they had three children: Karl Harold, Estelle Mary and John Kenneth Howard. Mrs. Breitrick died May 5, 1905, and on July 7, 1908, Mr. Breitrick was married (second) to Miss Jennie Vanderheiden. They have no children. Mrs. Breitrick is a member of the Methodist Church. In political matters Mr. Breitrick is a Republican.

PATRICK H. PRUNTY, a well-known citizen of Outagamie county, was born in Province Connaught, Ireland, and came to the United States with his brother, Peter, in 1845, when nineteen years of age, settling near Boston, Massachusetts, where he secured employment on farms. In 1851 the brothers started for California, via the Isthmus of Panama, making their way by foot across to the Pacific coast, where they took a vessel. After spending three years in placer mining they returned over the same route, and remained in Boston during the winter of 1855, when they came to Outagamie county, via Milwaukee. Patrick H. Prunty bought the south one-half of section 15, Town 22, range 16 east, in Ellington township. His brother Peter also purchased a quarter section of land north of the town of Stephensville. Patrick H. Prunty sold the east one-half of the southeast quarter of section 15 later on, and still later disposed of another eighty acres, but continued to hold 200 acres, which he developed from a wild waste of timber land on which only a small claim shanty had been built, into a fertile, productive farm with large residence, handsome barns and other farm buildings. On July 18, 1858, he was married to Anna Haffnier, who was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, and came to this country when three years of age in 1837, with her father and mother, John and Nora (Dwyer) Haffnier, who came. to this county in 1848 and settled in Greenville township, where both died. Mr. and Mrs. Prunty have been the parents of ten children, as follows: Peter S., who met an accidental death while operating a threshing machine in South Dakota, August 29, 1885, at the age of twenty-seven years; John H., who died in 1902, when forty-three years old; Patrick L., residing in Canada; Mary J., who married J. P. Crow and lives in South Dakota; Nora E., who married Frank Sheelar, of South Dakota; Michael E., unmarried and living on the homestead; Catherine, who is keeping house for her father in Appleton; Francis T., who married Agnes Corney and lives at Bear Creek; James, living on the homestead; and Anna E., teaching in the Third Ward school, Appleton, Wisconsin.

JAMES PRUNTY, chairman of Ellington township and one of the leading agriculturists of his section, is a son of Patrick H. Prunty. He was born March 15, 1872, on the homestead farm in Ellington township, and after attending the district schools of his neighborhood entered the High school in Appleton, where he continued three years. He then taught district school No. 4, Ellington township, for one year, after which he rented a farm near Aberdeen, South Dakota, for two years. During the two years that followed he was engaged in railroad construction in North Dakota and Minnesota, and he then went to Superior, Wisconsin, where for one year he was engaged in the wood and coal business with his brothers, Patrick L. and Michael E. They also made their headquarters there for jobbing in lumbering, and in 1899 returned to the old homestead. In 1900, with his brother, Michael E., Mr. Prunty began working the home farm for his father, and in 1904 the brothers purchased the land, their father retiring in the following year and moving to Appleton, where he now resides. Mrs. Prunty died during the winter of 1909. On October 6, 1908, Mr. Prunty was married to Lillie Louise Kimm, daughter of Francis and Julia (Downing) Kimm, of Minnesota, Mrs. Prunty having been reared in Mankato, that State. Mr. and Mrs. Prunty have one son, Kimm Patrick, born January 23, 1910. They belong to St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church. In politics Mr. Prunty is a Democrat, but he relies on his own judgment to tell him the best man for the position. He was township clerk for two terms, township assessor for a like period, and in the spring of 1911 was elected to the office of township chairman, in which capacity he is now acting.

JAMES E. HAWLEY, who has developed one of the finest farms in his section of Greenville township through a knowledge of soil and climatic conditions, backed by hard work and good management, is a son of David Hawley, a native of County Tipperary, Ireland. David Hawley came to the United States in young manhood, and was about twenty years of age when he settled in Greenville township, after having spent a short time in Green Bay. He settled on wild timber land, on which he built a little log house, and this was his home until he had cleared and cultivated a part of his farm, when he erected a better home of frame, and here he continued to reside until his death, January 11, 1890. Mr. Hawley married Margarette Sheirdan, who was born in County Wexford, Ireland, and she died January 4, 1906, having been the mother of nine children. James E. Hawley was born August 20, 1876, and received his education in the district schools of Greenville township and St. Mary's school in Appleton. He has always worked on the home farm, and when his father died, his elder brother, Thomas, took charge of the property, being the manager thereof until James E. was nineteen years old when the latter took charge, and so continued until the mother's death in 1906, at which time James E. purchased the interest of the other heirs and has since operated the farm alone. He has been a hard and faithful worker and has brought the land into a high state of cultivation and equipped it with good, substantial barn and outbuildings and with modern power machinery. He carries on general farming and dairying, and the large crops which he raises testify to his ability as a farmer. Mr. Hawley has never married, but since his mother's death his niece, Mary Mailey, daughter of his sister Margaret, has kept house for him. He is a consistent member of St. Mary's Catholic Church of Appleton.

WILLIAM KLITZKE, who is engaged in cultivating eighty acres of fine farming land in Ellington township, is a native of Germany, and was born in 1866, a son of Charles and Fredareka Klitzke. Charles Klitzke was born in the Fatherland and came to the United States in 1881, bringing his wife and four children: August, Minnie, Bertha and William. He purchased the property that is now being cultivated by Herman Klitzke, and there he continued to reside until his retirement, at which time he removed to Appleton, in 1891, and there he now resides. His wife passed away in 1889. William Klitzke received his educational training in the schools of his native country, and accompanied his parents to the United States in 1881. He spent the greater part of his time until he was married at farm work, and after that event he worked for four years in the Appleton paper mills. He then purchased his present eighty-acre farm, on which he has carried on operations to the present time. He built a new residence, remodeled the barn, put in new fencing and made a number of other improvements, making the farm one of the best of its size in this part of the township. He has carried on general farming and dairying, and his efforts have met with well-deserved success. In 1893 Mr. Klitzke was married to Lena Mueller, daughter of Charles and Maria Mueller, of Center, a native of Center township. Mr. and Mrs. Klitzke have had five children: Gordon, who died at the age of nine months; William; Elmer Irvin, Dorothy and Viola. The family is connected with the German Lutheran Church of Ellington.

HERMAIN ZSCHAECHNER, a wide-awake and progressive citizen and one of the leading agriculturists of Greenville township, where he is the owner of a farm of 165 acres, is a native of Germany, where he was born November 24, 1842, a son of Christian and Margaret (Shstdell) Zschaechner, natives of the Fatherland who never came to the United States. He attended the schools of Kreilbar, Germany, and came to the United States in 1870, first settling in Pennsylvania, where he secured work in a tannery, continuing there one year and then removing to Grand Chute township, where he worked as a carpenter, a trade he had learned in his native country. After seven years spent there, Mr. Zschaechner sold his property and removed to the farm on which he now makes his home, his first purchase being eighty acres, to which he added eighty-five acres 18 years later. He operates this property with the assistance of his sons, and has been very successful in general and dairy farming. He has a thorough knowledge of agricultural conditions in this section, is an expert on crop location, and proves by the large crops that he raises and of which he easily disposes that he is an excellent farmer. In political matters he is a Republican, but he has not found time to engage actively in public matters. The family belongs to the Lutheran Church. On August 20, 1870, Mr. Zschaechner was married to Paulina Plueberger, who was born in the old country but married Mr. Zschaechner in America, and to this union there have been born eight children: Minnie; who resides at home; Anna, who married Gust Schneider, a resident of Minnesota; Hulda, who married Louis Becker, a Grand Chute township farmer; and Clara, Emma, Alma, Herman and Otto, all single and residing on the homestead farm.

CLARENCE N. NUTTING. This gentleman, who is ranked among the progressive and public-spirited farmer citizens of Greenville township, is operating a fine dairy farm on 127 acres, and is a native of Jefferson county, Wisconsin, where he was born September 13, 1871, a son of Lucien A. and Amelia (Nutting) Nutting, the former born March 27, 1848, and the latter in 1850, in the same county. Lucien A. Nutting was a carpenter by trade, and for some years followed that occupation in the town of Farmington, but now devotes his entire time to his trade in the town of Baraboo. He and his first wife had but one child, she dying when Clarence N. was only three weeks old, and since then he has been married twice, his third wife having borne him one son, Charles, who resides near Seymour. Clarence N. Nutting attended the district schools in Farmington, as well as a high school in Fort Atkinson, and made his home with his grandfather from the time he was three weeks old until his marriage, when he rented and bought land in Jefferson county, and resided there six years. At the end of that time he located on his present farm in Greenville township, a well-cultivated tract of 127 acres, which he devotes to dairy farming, making a specialty of Holstein cattle, and White Chester and Ohio Improved hogs. He is independent in his political views, voting for the man from whom he thinks the community can get the most benefit. Nutting was married March 9, 1898, to Cora Potter, who was born in Jefferson county, June 20, 1878, daughter of Ferman and Jane (Cory) Potter, the former a native of New York State and the latter of England. They came to Wisconsin about 1846, and here Mr. Potter became well known and highly esteemed, accumulated property and continued to work his farm until his health failed, at which time he went to live with his son in Oakland township, where his death occurred. His widow now makes her home with Mr. and Mrs. Nutting. The latter was the fifth of a family of seven children. Mr. and Mrs. Nutting have had three children, born as follows: Nelson, December 20, 1899; Elwin, born January 8, 1905: and Lenora, born March 30, 1910.

CHARLES WIEDENHAUPT, who is ranked among the public-spirited citizens and skilled farmers of Buchanan township, is the owner of a farm of 143 acres, situated in section 35. Born in Germany, Mr. Wiedenhaupt is a son of Henry and Charlotte Wiedenhaupt, who came to America in 1863, settling first in Menasha, Wisconsin, for fifteen years, where Mr. Wiedenhaupt worked in the hub and spoke factory. He then purchased sixty acres in section 26, Buchanan township, and lived there until 1906, when he retired, and is now living with his son William in Kaukauna, being eighty years of age. His wife died in the spring of 1901, aged seventy-three years, and was buried in the Appleton Cemetery. Charles Wiedenhaupt was born October 7, 1863, the third child of a family of seven, and worked for his father until his marriage, September 13, 1894, to Miss Mary Zarnott, who was born September 29, 1873, the third of the five children born to Fred and Christina Zarnott, natives of Germany. Mrs. Wiedenhaupt's parents were married in the Fatherland and came to America about 1867, settling in Manitowoc county, where they have resided ever since, Mr. Zarnott being seventy- three years of age and his wife seventy. Mr. and Mrs. Wiedenhaupt have had seven children: Alfred, Charles, Odana, Benjamin, William, Viola and Rachel. Mr. Wiedenhaupt has 130 acres of his property under cultivation, all of it being fenced with barbed wire, and he carries on general farming, stock raising and dairying, marketing his dairy products, hay, grain, potatoes, poultry, hogs and cattle. He milks ten Jersey cows, keeps Berkshire hogs and breeds to Belgian horses. He erected his modern frame house in 1894 and built his basement barn, 40x80, in 1901, having bought the property two years before his marriage and resided on it since that event. He is a Republican in political matters and with his family attends the Lutheran Church of Kaukauna.

HERMAN TAYLOR HARDACKER, in whose death, which occurred November 30, 1909, Ellington township lost one of its most prominent citizens, was known all over Outagamie county as a farmer, business man and public official, and in every walk of life sustained a reputation for honesty and integrity. Born in Ellington township, November 20, 1854, Mr. Hardacker was a son of James and Elizabeth Hardacker, the former born in Nova Scotia in 1818. He came to Wisconsin as a young man and settled in the southern part of the State, but later moved to Ellington township, and there died December 12, 1857, his widow, also a native of Nova Scotia, surviving until 1861. Herman T. Hardacker was one of nine children, and he received his education in the district schools of his native neighborhood, but was not given unusual advantages as his father died when he was three years old and his mother when he was just past six, and he was compelled to go to work when he was still a youth. At the age of nineteen years he purchased forty acres of the homestead, on which he began farming. From time to time he added to his acreage, until at the time of his death he had a well-cultivated tract of 180 acres, finely equipped with modern buildings and operated with the latest machinery. Mr. Hardacker was progressive in his ideas, and even as a young man advocated the use of power machinery in all farming operations. He was the owner of a complete threshing outfit which he operated during season, and was the first man to use successfully in the county a self-feeder and cyclone stacker. He was always prominent politically, being an adherent of Republican principles. In addition to being one of the first directors of the county insane asylum and a member of the board for fourteen years, he held numerous school offices, was president of the Home Mutual Insurance Company of Ellington for thirteen years, served on the township board and was chairman of Ellington township for many years. As a public official and private citizen he had the esteem and respect of all who knew him and who could recognize and appreciate his many admirable traits of character. With Mrs. Hardacker he attended the Baptist Church at Hortonville. In 1876 Mr. Hardacker was married to Miss Emma A. Jack, who was born December 25, 1858, in Greenville township, daughter of Hiram and Mary (Hunter) Jack, the former born in New Brunswick and the latter in Scotland. They came to the United States in 1854, locating in Greenville township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hardacker, of whom two, Clyde H. and Wayne Clinton, are deceased. The survivors are Glenn Marshall, Jennie Emma, Jessie Belle, Ona Mildred and Marian Elizabeth.

JOSEPH KLEIN, whose life has been spent in agricultural pursuits on the farm of 160 acres on which he now resides in section 29, Buchanan township, was born on this property December 12, 1872, and is a son of Matt and Anna M. (Roerig) Klein, the former a native of Germany and the latter of Wisconsin. They were married in this State, immediately thereafter buying eighty acres of land in Buchanan township, at that time covered with timber, and Klein first cut down trees, hewed them into logs and built a small house, and here he continued to work at clearing and cultivating and from time to time adding to his property, until his retirement in the fall of 1909, since which time he and Mrs. Klein have lived in Appleton, he having reached the age of seventy-one years and she being sixty-three. Eight of their ten children are living, and of these Joseph was the second in order of birth. He received a district school education and worked for his father until nearly twenty-eight years of age, when he began working for wages and so continued for five months. He was married April 9, 1901, to Miss Frances Feypel, daughter of Michael and Catherine (Victor) Feypel, natives of Belgium, where Mrs. Klein was also born, March 12, 1879. They came to America in 1895 and settled in Appleton, but after five years moved to Dorchester, where they are now engaged in farming eighty acres of land, Mr. Feypel having reached the age of fifty-eight and his wife fifty-six years. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Klein, of whom five are living: Frances, Michael, Chrecentia, Matthew and Rosella. Mr. Klein has 110 acres under the plow, all fenced with barbed wire, and he does general farming and markets dairy products, hay and grain. In politics he is a Democrat, and he has served as a member of the school board for one term. He and his family are members of the Catholic Church of Kimberly, Buchanan township.

JOSEPH P. FASSBENDER, conducting an excellent general farm in Ellington township, Outagamie county, was born August 20, 1868, on his present farm, and is a son of Peter and Elizabeth (Nettenkoven) Fassbender. His grandfather, John F. Fassbender, was born in 1811, in Germany, and married Miss Sarah Bel, a native of Prussia. Three children were born to them, of whom Peter was the father of Joseph P. He was born December 22, 1838, in Oedecoven, near the Rhine, Prussia, and in 1856 came to the United States with his parents, the family landing at New York, from whence they made their way to Granville, Milwaukee county, Wisconsin. After the death of his mother, Peter Fassbender removed to Madison, Wisconsin, securing work on a farm until August, 1862, when he was married to Miss Elizabeth Nettenkoven, who was born in Prussia in October, 1839, and they had nine children: Annie, John M., Joseph P., Conrad, Francis, Hubert, Lizzie, Henry and Maggie. After marriage Mr. and Mrs. Fassbender resided on rented land for one year and then moved to Ellington township, where he purchased sixty acres of timbered land, to which in later years he added eighty acres, and rebuilt the house and barns, continuing to reside on this property until his retirement in 1902, since which time he has been living quietly in Appleton. Joseph P. Fassbender received his education in the district schools in the neighborhood of his father's farm, and he has always remained on the home place, of which he took charge at the age of thirty years, and three years later he bought the land. In 1902 Mr. Fassbender was married to Miss Josephine Ellenbecker, daughter of John and Barbara Ellenbecker of Center township, and they have five children: Barbara, Elizabeth, William, Henrietta and Eleanor. Mr. and Mrs. Fassbender are members of the Catholic Church at Greenville. Mr. Fassbender carries on mixed farming and also does dairying, keeping a fine herd of blooded Holstein cattle, and being the owner of the prize-winning registered bull "Cornucopia Haegerfeldt."

JOHN WITTMANN, one of the leading agriculturists of Buchanan township, who is operating 440 acres of fine farming land, 226 acres of which are located in Outagamie county and the remainder in Calumet county, just across the county line, resides in section 32, Buchanan township. His parents, Joseph and Monica (Steger) mWittmann, were natives of Germany and came to the United States in early life, being married in Milwaukee. They then moved to Menasha, but after one year went to Maple Grove, Calumet county, and spent ten years on a farm, which they sold to purchase sixty-two acres in section 32, Buchanan township. Eleven years later Mr. Wittmann bought sixty-two acres of land in Harrison township, Calumet county, just across the line, and there his death occurred in December, 1889, when he was seventy-five years old, his widow surviving until August, 1908, when she passed away at the age of seventy-six years, and both are buried in the cemetery at Darboy. John Wittmann was the second of a family of nine children, of whom five are living, and he remained at home until he was twenty-four years of age. On November 16, 1882, he was married to Miss Margaret Mueller, daughter of George and Catherine (Keipes) Mueller, natives of Luxemburg, Germany, who were married in that country and came to the United States in the spring of 1860. They settled first in Calumet county, on a part of Mr. Wittmann's present 925 farm, buying eighty acres of wild land on which Mr. Mueller built a log house, the logs for which were cut and hewed by himself. He continued to reside here until after the war, developing and cultivating his land, and then bought 120 acres in Buchanan township, which property is now being operated by Henry Schaffer. He then bought eighty acres in Calumet county, to which he moved two years later, still retaining his other property and lived there fifteen years, when he again located on the 120-acre farm in Buchanan township, and there his wife died March 17, 1893, aged fifty-six years, while he still survives and makes his home with Mr. Schaffer. Mrs. Mueller was buried at Darboy Cemetery. Mrs. Wittmann was the second of a family of six children, of which two are living today, and was born July 26, 1863. She and Mr. Wittmann have been the parents of twelve children: Margaret, single and living at home, who has been given a special education in music and drawing; Catherine, who was also given a musical education; and George, Arthur, Michael, Joseph, Hugo, Wilfred, Hildegard, Angeline, Isadore and Andrew. After his marriage Mr. Wittmann engaged in farming for himself on the place which he now owns, then a tract of 166 acres, but after two years leased this property and rented the farm of his father-in-law for six years, after which he returned to his present property which he has been operating ever since, adding to his holdings from time to time until he now owns 440 acres, 410 acres of which are under cultivation, fenced with barbed and woven wire. He does general farming and stock raising, marketing dairy products, hogs and cattle, grain and hay. He milks thirty-two cows, keeping graded Holstein and Short Horns, and also breeds Poland-China hogs. In 1891 Mr. Wittmann built his modern residence which has eleven rooms not including clothes closets and pantries, and one year later he erected a good frame barn, which has since been remodeled twice, today standing 100x30 feet and 100x34 feet in dimensions. He gets his water supply from drilled wells, fitted with windmills and gasoline motor. Mr. Wittmann has also interested himself in fruit culture and has about 100 fruit trees of various kinds. Mrs. Wittmann is a member of the Lady Foresters, auxiliary to the Catholic Order of Foresters, St. Johannis Court of Little Chute, No. 555. In political matters Wittmann is a Democrat, while the family's religious connection is with the Holy Angel Church of Darboy, Buchanan township.

AUGUST WUNDROW, who has spent his entire life on the farm which he now operates, a tract of 127 acres situated on sections 26, 27 and 33, Buchanan township, has been prominently identified with the agricultural and public interests of this district for a number of years. Mr. Wundrow was born on this property, December 19, 1870, and is a son of Frederick and Johanna (Harp) Wundrow, natives of the Fatherland, who were married in Germany and came to America shortly thereafter, settling first in New York. They came to Wisconsin before the outbreak of the Civil War, Mr. Wundrow's first wife dying in Menasha, in which city he was again married. After his second marriage, Mr. Wundrow came to Outagamie county, and bought seventy-two acres of land, a part of the property that is now being operated by his son August, at that time all wild land. He had to cut down trees and hew logs to build his first log home, a structure 18x24 feet, and here he resided until his death, November 30, 1904, aged seventy-three years, at which time he had a farm of eighty acres in a high state of cultivation. Mrs. Wundrow died August 27, 1907, aged seventy-six years and both were buried in Riverside Cemetery, Appleton. There were eight children born to Frederick and Johanna (Harp) Wundrow, and August was the seventh in order of birth. He has always resided on the home property, and after the death of his father purchased the interests of the other heirs. He was married November 18, 1896, to Miss Louisa Hupfauf, who was born February 24, 1878, the eldest of the four children of George and Julia (Roglar) Hupfauf, natives of Germany who came to America in early life and were married in Calumet county, where Mr. Hupfauf still resides. Mrs. Wundrow died December 25, 1902, and is buried at Riverside cemetery, having been the mother of three children: Arthur, Walter and Elsie, the latter of whom died in childhood. On July 13, 1904, Mr. Wundrow was married (second) to Miss Mary Gergs, born June 16, 1884, in Chicago, Illinois, the sixth of the eight children born to John and Matilda (Frause) Gergs, natives of Germany. They were married in the Fatherland and first emigrated to London, but after five years there came to the United States and located in Chicago. They came thence to Marshfield, Wisconsin, when Mrs. Wundrow was but a child, and they still reside at that place, Mr. Gergs being sixty-three years of age and his wife fifty-seven. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Wundrow: Adela, Harvey and Elsie. Mr. Wundrow has all but five acres of his land under cultivation, and it is all fenced by barbed and woven wire. He carries on general farming and stock raising, markets dairy, products, cattle and some grain, and milks ten graded Short Horn and Guernsey cows. He keeps Poland-China hogs and breeds to Belgian horses, having an interest in the Belgian stud. His barn is 34x56 feet, and was built in 1875 and remodeled in 1911, when a basement was added and patent stanchions were put in. Another barn, 32x44 feet, was built in 1880, and the residence, a frame, two-story structure of nine rooms, in 1882. His water supply is secured from drilled wells. In politics, Mr. Wundrow is a Republican, and for four years he has been a member of the board of supervisors, as well as having been a member of the school board for six years. The family religious connection is with the Zion Lutheran Church of Appleton.

WILLIAM DEGAL, who has spent his life in agricultural pursuits in Dale township, is now the owner of eighty acres of fine farming land in section 22, a part of the homestead on which he was born March 4, 1865, a son of Martin and Hannah (Zehner) Degal. Martin Degal was born in Germany and came to America lwhen three years of age, his parents settling in Pennsylvania where he married Hannah Zehner, a native of the Keystone State. After their marriage they came to Outagamie county and settled on the farm in Dale township that is now owned by their son William, and here Mr. Degal died June 18, 1896, at the age of sixty-six years, and his widow still survives him, being eighty years of age. William Degal was the second of his parents' three children, and he has always resided on the home farm, which he took charge of at the time of his father's death. He has his land all under cultivation, fenced with barbed wire and nicely graded. He does general farming, markets dairy products, hogs, sugar beets, potatoes and corn, and milks eleven cows the year around. He breeds to Holstein cattle and keeps Poland-China hogs. Mr. Degal erected his basement barn in 1895, and he has a modern brick residence and substantial outbuildings, the whole property showing the beneficent effects of able management. Mr. Degal is a member of the N. F. L. and is a Democrat in politics, while his religious connection is with the Lutheran Church, of which Mrs. Degal is a member. On March 2, 1897, Mr. Degal was married to Miss Lena Herbst, daughter of Fred and Catherine Herbst, natives of Germany, who were married and settled in Dale township, where they are now living retired, Mr. Herbst being seventy-one years old and his wife three years younger. Mrs. Degal was the sixth of a family of ten children and was born in June, 1872. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Degal: Doris and Willis.

JOHN MENTING, one of the old and honored residents of Buchanan township, Outagamie county, who has been engaged in farming and gardening in this locality for many years, is now carrying on operations on a neat little tract of land in section 24. He was born May 8, 1838, in Holland, the youngest son of the nine children of John and Wilhelmina Menting, who never left their native country. Mr. Menting was thirty-one years of age when he came to the United States, settling in the township of Little Chute in May, 1869. He lived in that township for two years and then came to Buchanan township, where he purchased thirty-three acres of land which was almost all cleared, and in later years he improved the remainder of the property and disposed of twenty-six acres. He works the seven remaining acres and is engaged principally in gardening, although he also rents some land and farms it. Menting is a Democrat in his political views, but has never cared to hold office. With his family he is a consistent attendant of the Catholic Church of Kimberly. In 1874, Mr. Menting was married to Miss Katie Tillman, a native of Wisconsin, whose parents, John and Annie Tillman, were married in this State and spent the balance of their lives here, her mother dying in Shawano county. Menting, who was the third of her parents' nine children, was born February 20, 1854, and died May 29, 1901, being buried at Kaukauna. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Menting: John, of Buchanan township, is married and has seven children; Mary married Herman Janssen, living with Mr. Menting, and has four children; and Henry, living in Niagara, Wisconsin, is married and has one child.

CONRAD GIEBEL, a prosperous farmer owning eighty acres of fertile land in section 30, Dale township, is one of the representative agriculturists of Outagamie county. He was born in Germany, October 1, 1845, being a son of Conrad and Elizabeth (Hengle) Giebel, who came to America in 1857, settling in Dale township, this county. Here the father invested in twenty-five acres of land just north of the village of Dale. At that time the land was covered with timber, but the sturdy German pioneer cut off the trees, built a log house and he and his sons placed the property under cultivation. This continued to be his home for a quarter of a century, when he sold it to one of his sons, he and his wife residing there still. However, in 1881, this son died, and for the following five years, the aged parents lived with their other children. In that year, the father died, in his eightieth year. The mother then went to live with Conrad Giebel, dying in his home in 1897, aged eighty-two years. Both parents were interred in Dale cemetery. Conrad Giebel, Jr., was the fourth in a family of seven children. When he was twenty-six years old, he bought eighty acres in Bear Creek township, Waupaca county, and spent seven years there, but then sold the property, returning to the homestead. After a year he left to buy his present farm upon which he has lived ever since. Forty acres of his farm are under cultivation, and enclosed with barbed wire and rail fences. He carries on general farming, raising dairy products, hogs, cattle, feeding his hay and grain to his stock, which he markets. In 1871, Mr. Giebel was married to Miss Phiana Zehren, born February 6, 1850, third child of five children born to her parents, John and Mary Zehren, natives of Pennsylvania, who came to Wisconsin in 1854, locating in Outagamie county. The father died in Dale township, in October, 1900, aged eighty-two years, but his widow survives, being now in her ninetieth year. There is no issue of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Giebel. Giebel is a Democrat, and he and his wife belong to the Lutheran Church of Dale, towards which they contribute generously. Giebel is another example of what can be accomaplished by the live, progressive farmers of the present day, who employ modern methods in their work, and raise only the best quality of products.

MARTIN HERMSEN, a. well known general farmer and dairyman of Vandenbroek township, who has developed an excellent property from what was originally a wild, uncultivated tract, was born in the woods of Vandenbroek township, December 17, 1861, and is a son of George and Elizabeth (Geurts) Hermsen. George Hernsen, who was a native of Holland, came to the United States with his wife and three children, Peter, Gertrude and John, the, family locating in Kaukauna township, Outagamie county, in 1855, Mr. Hermsen purchasing wild land, on which he built a log house with a wooden chimney. He set about to cultivate his land, and at the time of his death, in 1883, when sixty-four years of age, he was not only one of the prominent farmers of his locality, but had filled various township offices, including those of school clerk and supervisor. His wife passed away in 1907, when eighty-nine years old. Four children were born to them after coming to this county, namely: George, Hannah, Martin and Mary. Martin Hermsen received his education in the district schools of the neighborhood of the home farm, and worked on the homestead for his father until he had reached the age of twenty-five years, when he purchased his present property from his father, and here he has resided ever since. There were no buildings on this land when Mr. Hermsen took possession, and but little clearing had been done on the land, but he was earnest in his efforts and now has a well-cultivated property, equipped with fine modern structures. General farming and dairy work have claimed his attention, and he is considered one of the good agriculturists of his section. Mr. Hermsen was treasurer of the township for one term, and for many years has served in a like position on the school board. He and his family belong to St. John's Catholic Church of Little Chute. In 1886 Mr. Hermsen was married to Cornelia Van Gompel, who was born in Vandenbroek township, daughter of Martin Van Gompel, and eight children have been born to this union, namely: George, Mary, Kathrine, Elizabeth, Peter, Henry, Herbert and Martha. The five oldest children, after diligent attendance at district school No. 4, received diplomas, respectively, in 1903, 1904, 1904, 1908 and 1911. Henry and Herbert are now attending the district school, while Martha., the youngest, is but five years of age.

HENRY J. GALLOW, one of Dale township's enterprising and progressive agriculturists, who has made a success of his 100-acre farm in section 11, is a native of Outagamie county, having been born in Appleton, October 19, 1876, a son of John and Catherine (Rench) Gallow. Mr. Gallow's parents, who were natives of Germany, were married in Cleveland, Ohio, and came to Wisconsin about 1875, locating in Appleton, where they resided until 1898, in that year selling their home and moving to a farm of ninety-nine acres near Hortonville, where Mr. Gallow died April 18, 1903. His widow, who survives him, is aged fifty-nine years. Henry J. Gallow was the second of his parents' five children, and he remained at home until he had reached his twenty-second year, at which time he commenced working on rented property. After three years he purchased a tract of ninety acres, located four miles west of Hortonville and lived there for five years, and in the fall of 1907 he purchased the property which he is now operating. On September 6, 1899, Mr. Gallow was married to Lydia E. Heger, daughter of Fred and Amelia (Warnes) Heger, natives of Germany who came to America in childhood and were married in Jefferson county, Wisconsin. They resided in that county until 1880, in which year they came to Outagamie county and settled on a farm of 140 acres near Hortonville. They lived on this property until their retirement in 1901, when they removed to Hortonville, and they now reside at that place, Mr. Heger being sixty-two years old and his wife one year younger. Mrs. Gallow was the fourth of their eight children and was born February 13, 1878. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Gallow: Esther, Leo, Benjamin, Ruth, Walter and Margaret, of whom Walter died in infancy. Mr. Gallow has sixty-five acres of his land under cultivation, principally fenced with woven wire, and he carries on general farming, marketing potatoes, dairy products, hogs and cattle. He has nine milch cows, and keeps Holstein cattle, Poland-China hogs and Percheron and French Coach horses. He has made a number of improvements on his property since locating here, including a fine barn, with cemented basement and patent stanchions. Mr. Gallow is a Democrat in his political views and is at present a member of the township board of supervisors. With his family he attends the Lutheran Church at Hortonville.

JOHN HERMSEN, one of the good, practical agriculturists of Vandenbroek township, where he owns a valuable tract of farming land, was born in Holland, December 10, 1854, and is a son of George and Elizabeth (Geurts) Hermsen. George Hermsen came to the United States with his wife and three children, Peter, Gertrude and John, in 1855, the family locating at once in Outagamie county, where Mr. Hermsen purchased land in the township of Kaukauna, now Vandenbroek township. At that time the country in this neighborhood was all raw, uncultivated land, with no improvements whatever, and Mr. Hermsen felled trees, hewed logs, and built a log house with a wooden chimney. Later he erected a new and better house, which has since been replaced by a new and better one by the son-in-law, John Vandenhooven. Mr. and Mrs. Hermsen lived on this property during the remainder of their lives, he dying in 1883, when sixty-four years of age, and she passing away in January, 1907, when she had attained the age of eighty-nine years. The children that were born to this couple after coming to the United States were: George, Hannah, Martin and Mary. The father became a prominent man in his community, serving his township as school clerk for twenty years and as supervisor for one year. John Hermsen was still an infant when the family came to America, and he received his education in the district schools of Vandenbroek township. Until he was large enough to go out among the farmers of his neighborhood, he worked on the home farm, but at the age of eighteen years he went north and worked in a sawmill, his wages being given to his parents. He so continued seven years, and in 1880 he was married to Hattie Gloudemans, who was born in Vandenbroek township, in 1859, daughter of Adrian Gloudemans. Twelve children were born to this union, two of whom, Martha and Peter, died in infancy. The survivors are: Jane, Elizabeth, George, Annie, Mary, Minnie, John, Martin, Rose and Delia. After his marriage Mr. Hermsen purchased the property which he is now operating, and has greatly improved the farm, replacing the log house and barn with modern frame structures. He carries on general farming and markets dairy products, while he raises some cattle for his own use. He is a member of St. John's Church of Little Chute, in the faith of which Mrs. Hermsen died, May 17, 1903.

DAVID ZEHNER, who for the past eight years has served in the capacity of clerk of Dale township, is the owner of a magnificent farm of 207 acres situated in section 27, and for a number of years has been closely identified with the agricultural and political life of this community. He is a native of Dale township, and was born January 18, 1862, a son of Abraham and Mary (Zehner) Zehner, natives of Pennsylvania who were married in Ohio. They came to Dale township in October, 1853, purchasing eighty acres of raw woodland, on which they lived until Mr. Zehner's retirement in 1882, when they removed to the village of Medina, where Mrs. Zehner died January 9, 1893, Mr. Zehner following her to the grave three months later, on April 14, when his death occurred at the home of his daughter in Dale. Both were seventy-six years of age, and were buried in the West Medina Cemetery. David Zehner was the youngest of a family of ten children and remained at home until he was twenty-one years of age, at which time he commenced working for wages at the painting and paper hanging trade, which he followed for nine years, in connection with working in the woods during the winter months. He then purchased thirteen acres of land in Medina, which he cultivated when he could spare the time from his trade, and in 1893 sold this land and purchased eighty acres of land in Dale township, this being a part of the land which he now owns. This land had been partly improved and there was a log house and frame barn on the property, and he cultivated this tract for nine years, when he added eighty acres by purchase from an uncle. He resided on the new purchase until 1911, when he removed to his modern residence, and he now rents to his son-inlaw, who is operating the property. In 1885, Mr. Zehner was married to Miss Eliza A. Diley, daughter of John and Rosanna (Hanselman), Diley, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Wurtemberg, Germany. Mrs. Diley came to the United States with her parents and she and Mr. Diley were married in the Keystone State. During the early '50s they came to Wisconsin and settled in Outagamie county, but later removed to Waupaca county, and both died in the township of Caledonia, and are buried in Pine Grove Cemetery at Dale. Mrs. Zehner was the seventh of their family of eight children, and was born March 19, 1860. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Zehner: Bessie E., who married Otto Doshner, is now living in Dale township and has two children; Norma E., who married Leonard Doshner, is living on the homestead; and David W., is single and living at home. Zehner now has about 100 acres under the plow and all is fenced with barbed and woven wire. He carries on general farming and stock raising and markets dairy products, hogs, cattle, sugar beets and potatoes, and feeds his hay and grain. He milks about twelve cows throughout the year, and keeps Poland-China hogs and breeds to Percheron horses. His residence is 18x26 feet on both sides, consisting of ten rooms, which are fitted with all modern conveniences. He also has a basement barn, 36x74 feet, and numerous outbuildings for the shelter of his stock, grain and machinery. A good driven well, with windmill attachment, furnishes the farm with water and in addition there is a clear, cool spring with a spring house built around it. Mr. Zehner is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, and his religious connection is with the Baptist Church of Dale. He has been prominent in Democratic politics, serving as chairman of the township board for five years, as clerk of the school board for seven years, as delegate to the county convention three years and as delegate to the State convention at the time of William Jennings Bryan's first nomination, and for the past eight years has served as township clerk. For about two years he was a director in the Home Insurance Company, and he is now serving as a notary public.

WENZEL HEINDL, who ranks high among the agriculturists of Vandenbroek township, is now one of the large land owners of his community, and is operating an excellent property of over 200 acres. He is a native of Bohemia, and was born February 21, 1856, a son of Joseph and Barbara Heindl. Joseph Heindl came to the United States with his wife and four children, George, Joseph, Martin and Wenzel, in 1857, and settled in Washington county, town of Wayne, Wisconsin, purchasing land on which he resided for eleven years. He then bought another farm in the northeastern part of Washington county, town of Trenton, which he cleared and improved, and there his death occurred in 1905, when he was eighty-seven years of age, his widow surviving him one year and also being eighty-seven years old at the time of her demise. Two other children were born to them after coming to the United States, namely: Mary and Nicholas. Wenzel Heindl received his education in the district schools of Washington county and as a lad and young man worked on his father's farm. When he was twenty-three years of age he came to Outagamie county, and bought eighty acres of land in Vandenbroek township, which formed the nucleus for his present fine farm. At that time the property was covered with brush, no improvements had been made and the land was destitute of buildings, but Mr. Heindl cleared and cultivated the tract, putting it into a high state of cultivation, erected modern, substantial buildings and made improvements that make the farm compare favorably with any in the township. In 1881 he was married to Matilda Juchimich of Appleton, and to that union there was born one child: Hubert Martin. Mrs. Heindl died in 1883, and in the following year Mr. Heindl was married to Christina Neinhouse, born in Washington county, Wisconsin, whence her parents had come from Germany. Eight children were born to Mr. Heindl's second marriage: Frank Joseph, Nicholas, Mary, William, George, Andrew and Magdaline, and Bernard, who died when two and one-half years old. Mr. Heindl has always been known as a public-spirited citizen, and his fellow townsmen elected him to the office of supervisor for five years, and he is now serving his third term as school director of his district. With his wife he attends Holy Cross Catholic Church of Kaukauna.

DWIGHT W. DEAN, who has been identified with the interests of Appleton, Wisconsin, for the past eight years, is one of the practical business men who contribute stability to the commercial reputation of the places in which they reside and at the same time by this diligent interest make up the best class of citizens. Mr. Dean was born in 1865, a notable year in the history of these United States, in the State of New York, and is a son of Tower J. and Esther Dean. The father was a carpenter and subsequently became a contractor and spent his entire life in New York, where his death occurred in 1896, having survived his wife for one year. Their family contained four sons and four daughters. Dwight W. Dean had intelligent parentage and was sent to the public schools in his native State where he completed the ordinary course and afterward made himself useful in assisting his father. It was in 1879 that Mr. Dean came to Wisconsin, locating in Waupaca county, where he built the first cheese factory and was a pioneer in the wholesale business in this industry. From Waupaca county in 1881 he came to Dale, in Outagamie county, and here he also erected the first factory of this kind ever built in the county, in which county he discovered fine business opportunities and at one time had five cheese factories in operation here and was, more or less, the real exploiter of what became known as one of the choicest products of Outagamie county. In June, 1893, Mr. Dean came to Appleton where he erected a large warehouse close to the depot, and went into the business of handling cheese, butter and all dairy products, and built also a cold storage plant and subsequently a second warehouse and additionally has a warehouse at Seymour. In his various undertakings Mr. Dean has been very successful and is now in the enjoyment of an annual business that approaches $500,000 and the outlook for the future is most encouraging. In his different plants he employs from five to twenty men. Mr. Dean was married May 26, 1878, to Miss Helene Wilson, a native of Waupaca county, Wisconsin, and they have had eight children, three of whom died in infancy. The survivors are: Pearl, who is the wife of William Usherman, resides at Green Bay; S. L., who is associated with his father in business, lives at Oshkosh; R. E., who is also in business with his father; Mabel, who is the wife of Frank Murphy; and Hazel, who lives at home. Mr. Dean and family attend the Congregational Church.

ARNOLD HURKMAN, one of the pioneers of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who for many years was well known as a leading agriculturist and large land owner of Vandenbroek township, was a native of Holland, and came to the United States when a lad of sixteen years. He had always cherished a great ambition to become a mighty hunter and on first arriving in this country displayed what his conception of the New World had been by marching down Broadway, New York, with his shot-gun on his shoulder, looking for "b'ar." He soon came West, settling in Minnesota, but after a short time heard that the hunting was good in Wisconsin and subsequently came to Outagamie county, locating on the south side of the Fox River, one-half mile from the city of Kaukauna, where he bought a small tract of land, built a little log cabin and began raising potatoes and pork, which he traded to the Indians for skins. After one year, in partnership with a friend, Henry Hammond, he bought 200 acres of land north of Kaukauna, and in dividing the property, Mr. Hurkman gave Hammond a double-barrelled shotgun for twenty acres of his share. In a few years he bought 180 acres more, just east of the original purchase, and in 1872 he erected a log house which still stands, and in which his hired help lived. Eventually, he sold off all of his land but 120 acres which became his home farm, and there he continued to reside until his death, April 17, 1886, when he was fifty-eight years of age. In 1858 he was married to Jane Verstegen of Little Chute, who died one year later, and in 1861 Mr. Hurkman was married to Hedrina Berendsen, who came from Holland with her parents, Henry and Katherina Berendsen, locating in Freedom township. To this union there were born six children: Mrs. Annie Deering; Mrs. Mary Gloudemans; Mrs. Nellie Vandenberg; John B., born July 11, 1872; Henry L., born July 8, 1874; and Bernard W., born October 16, 1877. Mrs. Hurkman died December 27, 1910, aged seventy-seven years, in the faith of the Holy Cross Catholic Church of Kaukauna, of which her husband had also been a member. The three Hurkman brothers were educated in the Parochial school of the Holy Cross Church, and as lads they worked on their father's farm. In 1893 John Hurkman went to Appleton, where he lived for two years, and then, with his brother-in-law, G. Deering, he rented and operated the home farm for four years. The younger brothers, John B., Henry L. and Bernard W., then rented the home place and operated it for a year, and in 1900 the three boys bought the home place, which they have since operated as a dairy farm. They sell and deliver milk to the city of Kaukauna, having the largest dairy business there. They have made numerous improvements to the home place, including the erection of a new $5,000 dairy barn, and they have also added to the acreage of the property, buying 163 acres to the east in 1901, and in 1911 purchased 74 acres to the east of that. The production of the farm has also been greatly increased, and nearly all of the product is fed to the animals. The property covers lots Nos. 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, 18 and 20, in the south one-half of Private Claim No. 35, and 163 acres in the west one-half of the same claim. The brothers are known as enterprising and progressive business men, and have the esteem of their fellow townsmen as public-spirited citizens. John and Bernard are unmarried, but Henry married Miss Annie Segglink, daughter of George Segglink, of Kaukauna, a retired farmer, and has one child, Arnold George, born May 10, 1910. The brothers are all members of Holy Cross Catholic Church.

WILLIAM L. LYONS, president of the firm of B. Lyons Company, large manufacturers of cigars at Appleton, Wisconsin, was born at Memphis, Tennessee, December 21, 1867, and is a son of Mark B. and Bertha (Lederer) Lyons, the former of whom came to the United States from Birmingham, England, in 1857, and was engaged in business in Tennessee until 1871. In the latter year he located in Appleton, Wisconsin, and for one year was engaged in the furniture business here, after which he established the firm of B. Lyons Company, at No. 821 College avenue, where the firm was located until 1887, when a three-story brick building was erected to accommodate the increased demand at No. 715 College avenue. In 1906 the business was incorporated with William L. Lyons, president and general manager; B. F. Lyons, of Beloit, Wisconsin, vice-president; and C. B. Lyons, secretary. The firm employs fourteen people and does a large mail order business in addition to having an excellent local trade, and sells in all towns adjoining Appleton, its special brands, "Capitols," being favored in the ten-cent variety, while the five-cent special are known as "Capitolettes." William L. Lyons received his early education in the public schools and later attended Ryan High school in Appleton, and graduated from the De Land Business College, after leaving which he learned the cigar making business with the company founded by his father. He married Cecelia V. Pioso, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and they, have had two children: Miriam Rose, and William P. Benjamin F. Lyons, a resident of Beloit, Wisconsin, in addition to being vice-president of the B. Lyons Company, is general manager of the Beloit Water, Gas and Electric Company. Misses Millie and Rose Lyons are residing at home with their parents, and the other sister, Clare, married H. D. Pioso, a resident of Chicago, and has two children. William L. Lyons is a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the Blue Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic fraternity. With Mrs. Lyons he attends Zion Temple, and was one of the founders of the Appleton Council, No. 155, United Commercial Travelers of America of which he has been secretary for a. number of years.

MARTIN THOMPSON, one of the prominent and successful farmers of Maine township, who owns and operates a good farming property of forty acres located on section 5, was born April 23, 1841, in Pennsylvania, and is a son of Stephen and Betsy (Carpenter) Thompson, natives of New York and Pennsylvania, respectively. They came to Wisconsin in 1852, settling in Winnebago county, from whence they later moved to Outagamie county, where both died, the father March 19, 1901, and the mother November 24, 1855, Martin Thompson was the fifth of a family of seven children, and he remained on the home farm until his enlistment in the Union army, in 1861, when he became a member of Company D, First Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with which he served two years, being discharged on account of disability. He remained at home three months, and then, having recovered his health, he re-enlisted in the Third Wisconsin Cavalry, Company G, with which he was connected until the close of the war, the company being engaged in frontier duty when the close of hostilities came. He received his discharge October 27, 1865, and was mustered out of the service at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. Mr. Thompson saw service in some of the most fiercely contested and bloodiest battles of the entire war, and always displayed such bravery under fire and faithfulness to duty as to win the regard of his fellow soldiers and the respect of his officers. Among his engagements may be mentioned: Perrysville, Stone River, Chattanooga, while he was in the infantry, and his services in the cavalry on the frontier included battles with the Indians at Cottonwood, Sand Boot, Plum Creek and Walnut Creek. After his return from the war he remained at home until he was thirty-three years of age, and on October 3, 1874, he was married to Miss Esther Ann Watson, born September 22, 1855, daughter of Thomas and Roxey (Chambers) Watson, natives of England and Wisconsin, respectively, who were married in Milwaukee. Her mother died at the age of twenty-three years, in May, 1857, and her father passed away May 19, 1883, at the age of sixty-three years. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson have had five children: Ella, who married George Diemel, living in Outagamie county and has four children; Meade, who is married and living in this county, having three children; Ira, who is living in Clintonville, Wisconsin, is married and has two children; Thomas, who is married and has two children, residing in Outagamie county; and Stephen, also residing in this county, has one child. After Mr. Thompson's marriage he purchased eighty acres of wild land near Hortonville, where he lived for four years, and he then sold and moved to Hortonville. In September, 1881, he bought the land on which he now lives, then a tract of eighty acres, which he put under cultivation with the exception of ten acres, but later deeded forty acres to his son, for whom he had also built a modern frame residence in 1909. Thompson's own house was built in 1901, at which time he also erected a large barn, and he has brought his land into an excellent state of cultivation, being engaged in stock raising and general farming. Mr. Thompson is a stanch Republican in his political views, and he has served for ten or twelve years as a member of the board of supervisors.

HERBERT E. ELLSWORTH, M. D., who may be called the dean of the medical profession now in active practice at Appleton, Wisconsin, was born at Hudson, Ohio, June 4, 1856, and is one of a family of five children born to his parents, who were Ransom P. and Caroline N. (Oviette)Ellsworth. The parents of Dr. Ellsworth were born in Winstead, Connecticut, where they were married in 1826, and two years later moved to Ohio. Ransom P. Ellsworth was a substantial farmer near Hudson and a highly respected citizen. He was twice married, first to Caroline N. Oviette, as mentioned, who died at Hudson, in 1868, and second to Eliza Castle. Five children were born to the first marriage and two to the second. The father survived until 1883, his death occurring at the age of eighty-two years. Reared on the home farm and attending the country schools, Herbert E. Ellsworth quietly cherished his ambitions to secure a medical education and as a first step in that direction, in 1872, entered the high school at Hudson, where he was graduated in 1876, being then twenty years of age. After a certain amount of preliminary home study, he entered the medical department of Wooster University, at Cleveland, Ohio, where he was graduated in 1881, subsequently taking a post-graduate course in the Columbus Medical College, at Columbus, Ohio, and was graduated there in February, 1882. After a few months of initial practice at Saginaw, Michigan, on November 3, 1882, he came to Appleton, where he has remained ever since, maintaining the same office during all these years. Here he has built up a large and satisfactory practice, general in character, and is firmly established in the esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens. For six years he has been city physician, and for four years has served in the same relation to the county, and thus has been afforded a wide field of experience. Dr. Ellsworth has always kept fully abreast of the times in his profession, and is a member of all the local medical bodies and the American Medical Association. For many years he has been active in various fraternal organizations, and belongs to the Masons, the Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Elks, Woodmen, the National Fraternal League, the Fraternal Reserve Association, the Mystic Workers and the Maccabees. He is a member of the Episcopal Church. Dr. Ellsworth was married to Anna M. Kline of Appleton, December 27, 1904. The doctor has one son, Thomas Harold, by a former marriage, who lives at Bloomington, Illinois. As a means of recreation, Dr. Ellsworth occasionally permits himself a short vacation in order to enjoy hunting and fishing.

STANISLAUS F. LISBETH, who has been intimately connected with the agricultural interests of Deer Creek township for a number of years, and is now the owner of eighty acres of well-cultivated land in section 26, is a native of Outz, Prussia, Germany, and was born November 5, 1862, a son of Anton and ------------(Kitnskchey) Lisbeth. They were natives of Prussia and came to America in 1865, settling in New London, Wisconsin, where Mr. Lisbeth died in 1872, and three years later his widow was married to John J. Gitzen and moved to Bear Creek township, Waupaca county, where Mr. Gitzen died about 1895. Mrs. Gitzen then came to live with her son, Stanislaus F., and is now ninety-two years old. Stanislaus F. Lisbeth was the youngest of the eleven children born to his mother's first marriage and he resided with her until he was nineteen years old, at which time he went to learn the blacksmith trade with George Freiburger of New London. After completing his apprenticeship, he worked for about four years as a journeyman, after which he was employed by a bridge construction gang for two years on the Green Bay and Wisconsin Railway. At the end of this time Mr. Lisbeth established himself in a mercantile business at Sugar Bush, Maple Creek township, but after twelve years sold out to H . Kiekhofer, and bought a farm of 120 acres, located near Hortonville, which he traded a short time later for the American Hotel at Clintonville. In 1908, Mr. Lisbeth traded the hotel for his present property, where he has since been engaged in general farming and stock raising, keeping Poland-China hogs and French Coach horses and marketing dairy products. He has his land all under cultivation and neatly fenced with barbed wire, and has a large, modern residence, substantial barn and good outbuildings. On July 6, 1885, Mr. Lisbeth was married to Victoria Kowalski, born April 20, 1865, daughter of Anton Kowalski, who came to America about 1864 and settled at Stevens Point, later moving to New London, where he died. Mr. and Mrs. Lisbeth have had four children Lawrence F., telegraph operator on the Soo Railroad at Wheeling, Illinois, married Miss Nellie Spence of Maple Creek township; John C., a plumber and steam fitter of Jamestown, North Dakota, married Helen Naze, of Welcome; Leonard J., single and living at home; and Angela M., who also resides with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Lisbeth are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church of Welcome, and Mr. Lisbeth holds membership in the Catholic Knights. He is a Democrat in politics, but votes independently in local matters.

THOMAS W. ORBISON, a member of the O'Keefe-Orbison Engineering & Construction Company, of Appleton, Wisconsin, whose reputation as a consulting engineer is country wide, was born in Plover, Wisconsin, in 1854, and is a son of Thomas and Susan S. (Kellogg) Orbison. Thomas Orbison was a native of Ireland, from whence he came to the United States in 1849, and located in Wisconsin. He was a minister of the Methodist faith, and had various charges throughout the State until 1869, when he came to Appleton to reside. His death occurred in Appleton in 1872. Mrs. Orbison, who was born in Pennsylvania, and is now living in Appleton, is a descendant of the old New England family of Kellogg. She and her husband had a family of three children: Mary, who is married and resides in New York City; Kate, living in Appleton, and Thomas W. Thomas W. Orbison's early education was secured in the public schools. Attended Lawrence College, Appleton, for three years and graduated from the civil engineering department of Union College in 1876. Shortly thereafter he went to the State of Colorado, where he was engaged in railroad work, and on his return to Wisconsin continued to engage in this line until 1881. From this time his chief work has been that of consulting hydraulic engineer, and opened an office in Appleton in partnership with Capt. Nathaniel M. Edwards in 1884, and subsequently the O'Keefe-Orbison Engineering and Construction Company was established by Mr. Orbison and Ed O'Keefe, a connection that has continued to the present time. Civil engineering covers so wide a field that of late years it has been necessary to specialize in the several individual branches, but in this connection it may be stated that both Mr. Orbison and the firm he represents have gained a reputation that extends from coast to coast as paper mill and hydraulic engineers.

In 1880 Mr. Orbison was married to Irene Ballard, daughter of Anson and Harriet (Story) Ballard, and to this union there were born three children: Eugene, a graduate of Cornell University, who is now connected with the General Electric Company, Schenectady, New York,, and Nellie and Mary, who are living at home. The family are members of the Congregational Church. Mr. Orbison is a Republican in political matters, and is fraternally connected with the Elks. He is a director of the Riverside Paper Mills, and is a member of the American Institute of Mining Engineers, the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Western Society of Civil Engineers and the Wisconsin Society of Civil Engineers. He is best known as a consulting engineer on hydraulic work.

FRED SCHMEICHEL, who started life in humble circumstances and has won his way to the front rank of agriculturists of Outagamie county, is now the owner of 200 acres of well cultivated land in Cicero township. He was born in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, March 18, 1855, and is a son of Jacob and Carolina (Kollaske) Schmeichel, natives of Austria who were born near the boundary line of Poland. They were married in their native country and came to the United States with their four children: Mary, Carrie, Mike and Julia, settling on a farm in Sheboygan county, and later moving to Manitowoc county. He never saw his father, as the latter died of typhoid fever, contracted in the swamps, and after his death, Schmeichel's mother married again, L. Schultz, both now being deceased. They had two children: Elvina who, is deceased; and Louis. Fred Schmeichel received only a meager education, the little teaching he received being at the German school. As a youth he worked on the home farm, and when he had reached his majority he secured his first eighty acres, fifty-five of which were partly cleared, with a small frame house and log stable. During the years that followed, he added to his property from time to time, first buying forty acres partly cleared, then forty acres of wild land, and still later eighty acres which were partly improved, and there he built one of the first silos in Cicero township, a fine frame house, a basement barn 52x100 feet, and a wagon and hog shed 30x60 feet. He carries on general farming, raises high grade horses and hogs, and specializes in Guernsey cattle. Mr. Schmeichel has won his present position by hard, industrious labor and by exercising a natural knowledge of his chosen occupation. In 1876 he was married to Miss Paulina Kurth, who died in 1895, having been the mother of children as follows: Levi, who married Minnie Brusewitz; Lydia, the wife of Charles Wussow; Arthur, who married Selma Wurl; and Laura, residing at home. Mr. Schmeichel was married (second) to Ida Wussow, born in Shawano county, and three children have been born to this union: Florian and Franklin, twins, the latter deceased, and Maynard, also deceased.

HENRY SCHUETTER, who during a long and active career was prominently identified with the business interests of Appleton, Wisconsin, is now living a quiet, retired life, satisfied in the knowledge that he has done his share in promoting the interests of his adopted city. Mr. Schuetter was born May 8, 1851, at Capelle, near Munster, Westphalia, Prussia, and is a son of William and Gertrude (Dickman) Schuetter, and grandson of Henry William and Mary Anna (Esberg) Schuetter, natives of Capelle and Werne, Prussia, respectively. The children of Henry William Schuetter and wife were William; Anna, who married Bernhard Mehring, a mason at Capelle; Elizabeth who married and lived near Capelle, in Westphalia; another daughter who became the wife of Theodore Holtrup, shoemaker at Capelle. William Schuetter, father of Henry, was born in 1807, also in Capelle, and there learned the trades of mason, builder and marble cutter and the profession of architect. He later became superintendent of public works in the employ of the Prussian Government, won a wide reputation as artist and sculptor, and in many ways was a brilliant and gifted man. He was married to Gertrude Dickman, daughter of Anna Katherine Dickman, who was born in 1805, in Prussia. In the Dickman family there were four children: Gertrude, who married William Schuetter; Annie Katherine the wife of John Bernard Neuhaus; Theresa, a resident of Westphalia; and B. Henry, married and living at Dusseldorf, Prussia, and they became the parents of three children: Anna, who died in Germany June 18, 1855, aged eleven years; William, born November 25, 1848, and died January 2, 1850, and Henry. Henry Schuetter was educated in the schools of his native locality, and was but twelve years of age when his father died. At the age of fifteen years, finding it necessary to depend on himself for support, he started to learn the tailor trade at Ascheberg, and when he had served but two years of the three-year apprenticeship he had made such rapid progress that his employer paid him for the final year. He worked for this man for four years in all, and in 1870 came to America, landing at New York, from whence he came to Wisconsin where he knew he could find friends. He arrived in Appleton on a Saturday, and by the Monday morning following he had started to work at his trade for C. O. Callaghan, with whom he remained for two months. Later he was employed by Edward Utley, H. A. Phinney and C. G. Mugridge, a cutter and refined gentlemen artist from Boston, the latter of whom did much to assist the German youth and make things easier for him. During the year 1871 Mr. Schuetter went to Chicago, where for a year he was employed at his trade, but returned to Appleton to accept the position of assistant cutter under C. G. Mugridge, with whom he remained two years, and during the next year following he worked as a clerk in the dry goods store of Clark & Edwards. He was later engaged as cutter by A. H. Van Strattum and subsequently by Mr. Ullman, but in April, 1883, engaged in business on his own account, a move for which he had been preparing for a number of years. The business, started in a humble way, grew steadily, and soon began to take on proportions that led it to be known as one of the largest merchant tailoring establishments in northern Wisconsin, employment being given to twenty hands. Mr. Schuetter is a man of exceptional business ability, and this he put to good use in conducting his enterprise, and to dealing in real estate, in which at one time he was a heavy investor. He now owns some valuable property in Appleton, including his handsome residence. In 1909 he retired from active business pursuits, selling his interests to his son. He is a stockholder in the Citizens Bank and a director in the Lakeside Paper Mill. On May 16, 1876, Mr. Scheutter was married to Mary Schmidt, born January 17, 1852, at Hatzenport, Rhenish Prussia, near Coblentz, daughter of Mathias and Gertrude (Moritz) Schmidt, natives of that place, who came to America in 1857. Here the father passed away seven months after landing, while his widow survived him until November 13, 1873. Of their seven children, three are now living, namely: Katie, Mary and Mathias: Mr. and Mrs. Schuetter have had seven children, as follows: William G. H., who is deceased; Edward C., who died in infancy; Carl A., who is conducting his father's business; Gertrude A. and Clara Anna, at home; Robert L., a graduate of the State University at Madison; and George M., a graduate of St. Mary's College, Kansas. The family is connected with the Catholic Church, being members of St. Joseph's congregation, and Mr. Schuetter is a member of the Catholic Knights and Knights of Columbus. In political matters he is independent, although all other things being equal he favors the Democratic principles.

WESLEY H. SHERMAN, a well known resident of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who lives in section 8, Osborn township, has one of the fine stock farms of this section of the county and is numbered with the substantial and enterprising men of Outagamie. He was born August 28, 1862, in Province Ontario, Dominion of Canada, a son of Emory William and Phebe (Finkle) Sherman. He was six years old when his parents came from Canada and settled on this farm, 120 acres of wild land, with the road running thirty rods farther east than at present. He started to clear his land with his only valuable stock at that time, a yoke of oxen, and in the course of time accomplished it and erected comfortable buildings. He became a recognized good farmer and stockraiser and was also a man of importance in politics, and in association with Mr. Melter, organized the Republican party in Osborn township. He survived until 1904, dying at the age of seventy-six years. He married Phebe Finkle, who was born in Canada, a daughter of George Finkle, who settled at Appleton and continued there. To the above marriage six children were born: Wilmet, Wesley, Williard, Bertha, Myrtle and Idalett.

Wesley H. Sherman in 1890 acquired the homestead, to which he later added forty-six acres and has improved all the land. He has devoted his attention particularly to stockraising. He began with Durham cattle, but now also has Holsteins, and thorough-bred heavy draft Percheron horses, having recently sold a pair of sucking colts for $250. He is an extensive breeder of Poland-China hogs and has now on hand over fifty of these superior swine. He owns a fine Kentucky bred mare for driving that has a record of one-eighth mile in seventeen seconds. Mr. Sherman has also been very successful with his poultry and has a handsome flock of the Light Brahma variety. Mr. Sherman was married in 1899 to Miss Jennie Weller, who was born in England, a daughter of Alfred and Harriet (Noakes) Weller. Two other children, James and William were born in the United States after the family camie here in 1871 and located at Oshkosh, Wisconsin. The father died of typhoid fever, in 1875, at the age of twenty-seven years. His parents, who accompanied him to Oshkosh, were George and Jennie (Richardson) Weller. Mr. Weller had one sister and two brothers: Ann, George and William. Mrs. Weller contracted a second marriage, with James Griffin of Oshkosh, and they moved to Shiocton, where he is a retired farmer. Mr. and Mrs. Sherman have three children: Hubert, Warene and Emery.

PETER R. THOM is general superintendent of the Kimberly- Clark Company, with headquarters at Neenah, Wisconsin. This important organization of combined capital and business talent controls the output of eight mills, owns and leases valuable water power and gives lucrative employment to 1,500 people. The officers and directors of this vast combination of interests are as follows: J. A. Kimberly, president; F. J. Sensenbrenner, first vice-president; J. C. Kimberly, second vice-president; S. F. Shattuck, treasurer; C. B. Clark, secretary, and Peter R. Thom, general superintendent. Of the original board of directors, C. B. Clark died in September, 1891; F. C. Shaddock died in 1900, and Alvina Babcock died in 1902. The Kimberly-Clark Company was established in 1872 by J. A. Kimberly, C. B. Clark, F. C. Shaddock and Alvina Babcock, at Neenah, Wisconsin, under the style of the Globe Mills, the business being the manufacture of paper and the output of their plant being three tons per day. In 1875 they expanded to a small degree, purchasing the Smith & Van Alsten Mill at Neenah and thereby increasing their production of paper to five and one-half tons per day, this plant now being known as the Neenah Paper Mill. The business prospered, and in 1877 the company purchased from Wharton Brothers, Appleton, their sawmill and on this site they erected the Atlas Paper Mill, which then had a capacity of ten tons of paper a day, and at the present writing its output is thirty tons a day. In 1881 they still further increased their interests, building the Vulcan Mills at Appleton, which were subsequently dismantled. In 1880 the company also bought the Conkey Flouring Mills and continued to operate them as such for two years, when they made additions and changes which made them suitable as paper mills and began paper manufacturing in the remodeled structures in 1883. In 1885 they dismantled the flouring mill at Neenah, owned by J. A. Kimberly, and at first its capacity was five tons of paper a day, which has been increased to eleven tons. In 1886-87 the company tore down the Neenah Mill and on the site erected new buildings and put in equipments for two paper machines with capacity of ten tons a day. The master business men at the head of this great enterprise saw opportunity for still further enlargement in 1887, when they bought not only the iron works of Edward West, at Appleton, but all the interests of his, with the water power, in the West Canal. On July 5, 1887, they started to build the Telulah Mills, which were completed and occupied by March 19, 1888, the capacity of these mills being fourteen tons per day. With remarkable sagacity, all of these purchases had been made, and in 1888 the company purchased the Kimberly water power, all the water power of the Fox River at this point. They built ground wood, sulphide and wrapping mills. In 1890 they built the two-machine mill at Kimberly, and in 1891 added one more machine, making the output capacity forty tons per day. In 1900 the paper mill was burned, but was rebuilt and business was resumed in July, 1905. Prior to this other purchases had been consummated by the company, all showing the foresight and good judgment of alert and astute men of business. In 1889 they purchased the water power at De Pere, Wisconsin, and organized the Shaddock & Babcock Paper Company, built mills and put them into operation in April, 1891, the output being fifteen tons of writing paper per day. This plant was operated by that company until 189-9, when it was sold to the American Writing Paper Company. In 1897-8 the company bought the mills of the Badger Paper Company at Quinnessec Falls, Wisconsin, and rebuilt the mills, taking out one machine and adding two more improved ones, also building sulphide mills, and the capacity of this plant is eighty tons of ground wood, sixty tons of sulphide and seventy-five tons of news print. They are also building a ground wood mill. The combined output of the mills of this company aggregates 450 tons of writing paper per day, together with wrapping, book and news paper. The Neenah Paper Company also manufactures writing paper, but does not belong to the Kimberly-Clark system, although all the members of the latter are interested in the former.

For twenty-eight years, Peter R. Thom has been with the Kimberly- Clark Company and is now general superintendent of their mills. He has had a large amount of experience in Massachusetts, Indiana, Connecticut and New York, in 1883 coming to Appleton and soon after identifying himself with the present company. He was married in 1882 to Miss Christina Watt, at Norwich, Connecticut, and they have five children. In politics he is a Republican, and he has been an active and useful citizen of Appleton, which city he served as mayor in 1895, 1896 and 1897. He is president and on the directing board of the Appleton Chair Company, the vice-president of the Riverside Fibre Paper Company, the Kimberly-Clark Company and the First National Bank. Fraternally, he is an Odd Fellow, a Pythian, a thirty-second degree Mason and a Shriner. He belongs to the Congregational.Church Society.

ISAAC THORN, one of Outagamie county's most representative men, who was for many years identified with the agricultural interests of Deer Creek township, is now living retired in Welcome, of which village he is now president. Born August 17, 1847, in Jefferson county, New York, Mr. Thorn is a son of Isaac and Mariam (Gardner) Thorn, natives of New York State and Massachusetts, respectively, and on the paternal side can trace his ancestry back to the "Mayflower," and on the maternal side to an old English family. Mr. Thorn's parents were married in New York State and came to Wisconsin in 1852, settling in Sauk county, where they were engaged in farming. Some years later they came to Deer Creek township, Outagamie county, where Isaac Thorn died about 1891, and his wife about 1887. Isaac Thorn was the youngest of their In seven children, and he received a common school education. 1864, although only seventeen years of age, he enlisted in Company A, Forty-seventh Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with which organization he served until the war's close. With his company he was detailed on guard and picket duty, guarding the railroads in Tennessee and was never assigned to brigade. He was mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee, September 22, 1865, and after his return from the war was engaged in lumbering and river driving for twenty-five years, most of the time working for wages. At the end of that time he bought eighty acres of land in Deer Creek township and engaged in farming, five years later purchasing forty acres adjoining his first purchase. On the raw timber land he erected a shanty, and here he and his family lived in the summer months while working the land, and in the winter he moved his family to the village while he went and worked in the woods at logging. At the end of five years he built a hewed log house and barn and with a team of oxen, a wagon, plow and drag, settled down to develop his land. As years passed by he built numerous outbuildings for the shelter of his stock, grain and machinery, and added modern farming implements piece by piece as he became financially able until he was fully equipped in this line. In 1893 he sold this property and moved to a farm of 116 acres in Deer Creek township which his second wife had inherited from her first husband, who was Thorn's brother, and there they lived until August, 1896, when Thorn was appointed postmaster at Welcome. At this time he rented his property and moved to the village, where he served as postmaster for eleven years, and since that time has been living retired.

In 1873, Mr. Thorn was married (first) to Miss Elizabeth Billings, daughter of Lyman and Eliza (Craig) Billings, natives of New York and early settlers of Wisconsin. Mrs. Thorn died in April, 1888, leaving six children, of whom the eldest died in infancy; Amy married Napoleon Thibeau, and they live in Deer Creek township and have eight children; Genevieve, who died in childhood; Lana E., single and living with his father; Ed J., also single and residing at home; and Guy, who met his death in a railroad accident when sixteen years of age. Mr. Thorn was married (second) in 1893, to Mrs. Adda Thorn, widow of Daniel Thorn, and daughter of Horace and Olive (Muncy) Wadsworth, natives of New York State and of English extraction on the father's side, and German on the mother's. They came to Wisconsin about 1850 and settled in Dane county, where both died. Mrs. Thorn was the youngest of a family of eight children, and was born July 3, 1847. There were no children born to Mr. Thorn's second marriage. Mr. Thorn is a member of Starkweather Post No. 51, Grand Army of the Republic, which he organized and of which he was the first commander and then was re-elected and served a second term. It originally had twenty-two members, but is now disbanded, there not being enough members to fill the offices. In politics, Mr. Thorn is a Republican, having cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln, and he is now serving as president of the village and also represents it on the board of supervisors. He is also a member of the board of school directors, was a deputy sheriff for two terms and served as assessor for four years. With his family he attends the Methodist Episcopal Church of Welcome, his wife being the first superintendent of the Sunday school, which was organized in 1894, and she served twelve years in that position. For about fifteen years Mr. Thorn served as a. member of the board of church trustees.

FREDERICK F. REINKE, postmaster of Welcome, Wisconsin, and one of the leading citizens of the village, is the owner of a farm of fifty-three acres in section 30, Deer Creek township. He was born January 2, 1863, in Dodge county, Wisconsin, a son of Charles and Augusta (Busslaff) Reinke, natives of Germany who came to America about 1852 and settled in Dodge county, where they bought eighty acres of land. The first home of the family here was a log house, 18x28 feet, and Mr. Reinke worked with a team of oxen, a wagon, plow and drag to clear his land and develop it into a farm, gradually adding to the improvements on the place until at the time of his death, in 1907, when he was eighty-eight years old, he had a fertile, well equipped farm. His widow, who still survives him, is living on the old homestead, and has reached the remarkable age of ninety-three years. Frederick F. Reinke, who is the youngest of his parents' ten children, started working for wages at the age of twenty years, and continued to do so until his marriage, March 21, 1889, to Miss Amelia Russ, daughter of August and Augusta (Tietz) Russ. Mrs. Reinke's parents were married in their native country, Germany, and came to America in 1887, settling in Waupaca county, on eighty acres of new land, which they cultivated and developed into a farm, on which the father still lives, at the age of seventy-five years, the mother having died in September, 1908, when sixty-seven years old. They had thirteen children, of whom Mrs. Reinke was the second, and she was born February 21, 1865. Mr. and Mrs. Reinke have had ten children: Adeline, who is assistant in the postoffice of Welcome, who is single and residing at home; Arthur and Elsie, at home; Esther, who died in infancy; Irene, who died at the age of seven years; and Edward, Elmer, Theodore, Frederick and Loretta, all at home. After his marriage, Mr. Reinke purchased the property on which he now resides, a raw, undeveloped property of sixty-three acres, of which he later sold ten acres for city lots. He has developed the remainder of his land into one of the finest farms of its size in this section. The residence which. he first built was remodeled in 1904, and in 1894 he built a large barn, 36x56, and numerous outbuildings for the housing and shelter of his grain, live stock, poultry and machinery. He carries on general farming and stock raising and markets dairy products, hogs and cattle, and some grain and hay. He has Holsteins and a mixture of other breeds in cattle, Poland-China hogs and Percheron horses. In politics he is a Republican, has served two terms on the board of supervisors, was the first president of the village of Welcome, in which capacity he served for five years, was a member of the school board for six years, and was appointed postmaster of Welcome, January 1, 1908, having been in that position ever since. He and his family are members of the Lutheran Church, and at present he is serving as deputy treasurer.

JOHN L. JACQUOT, one of Appleton's substantial business men, who is engaged extensively in the manufacture of and wholesale dealing in cheese, is a son of Louis Jacquot, and was born July 15, 1830, in Outagamie county, Wisconsin. Mr. Jacquot received a common school education, and his early business training was secured in a mercantile establishment at Merrill, Wisconsin, with which he was connected two years, after which he formed a partnership with John McMurdo, Jr., and bought the sash and door factory of W. K. Rideout at Hortonville. Here Mr. Jacquot also operated a lumber yard and sawmill for five years, when he went into the lumber and log business in Northern Wisconsin, with Robert McMurdo, and in 1894 came to Appleton, where, during the following year he first engaged in the wholesale cheese business. He continued to follow this business in Appleton until 1901, and in that year went to Neenah, purchasing an interest in the Neenah Cold Storage Company, but after managing that concern for six years sold his holdings, and in May, 1903, returned to Appleton, where he has since devoted his attention to the business in which he is now engaged. Mr. Jacquot has had much experience in this line, and his product is of a very excellent quality, finding a ready sale in the markets throughout the United States, while his business ability has evidenced itself in the manner in which his business has grown. Mr. Jacquot was married in 1881 to Elma R. Whitman, who was born in Hortonville, Wisconsin, a daughter of Frank and Amelia Whitman, a pioneer couple of Outagamie county. Mrs. Jacquot died in 1898, leaving a son and a daughter, and Mr. Jacquot was married (second) in 1900 to Emma Kurasch, of Appleton, daughter of Henry Kurasch. Mr. Jacquot is prominent fraternally, belonging to the Masons, the Modern Woodmen of America, the Elks and the Eastern Star.

HENRY J. PROSSER, one of the old and honored residents of Seymour, Wisconsin, who during the past ten years has lived in quiet retirement, is a son of Henry Prosser, a native of County Monmouth, England. Henry Prosser was born in 1819 and some time between the years 1840 and 1850 came to the United States, with his wife and two children, Henry J. and Mariah, locating at Pottsville, Pennsylvania, where he was naturalized March 13, 1854. He was a blacksmith by trade, and this occupation he followed, in conjunction with mining at Pottsville, Bear Ridge, Beaver River and Minersville, Pennsylvania, and his death occurred January 15, 1906, when he was past eighty-six years old. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Susanna Hoskins, passed away April 21, 1894, when seventy-three years and one month old. Besides the two children born in England, Mr. and Mrs. Prosser had four children born to them in this country, namely: John and Emma, deceased; George, who met his death at the age of four years, when run over by a drift car at the Beaver River mines; and Robert, who died at Tuscarora, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, aged six months.

Henry J. Prosser was born February 15, 1843, in Monmouthshire, England, and was a mere lad when he accompanied his parents to America. His education was secured in the schools of Pennsylvania, and in his youth he learned the trade of blacksmith, which he followed around Pennsylvania until the year 1877, when he came west to Wisconsin, locating in Watertown and two years later coming to Seymour. Here he opened an establishment with his wife's brother, Richard Holman, and they continued in business for twenty-two years, at the end of which period Mr. Prosser sold his interests to his partner and retired from active life. Mr. Prosser is a Republican in his political views, and in addition to serving as school director, he has been on the county board for one year and for two years on the board of aldermen. Fraternally he is connected with Social Lodge No. 56, I. O. O. F., Minersville, Pennsylvania.

On November 4, 1871, Mr. Prosser was married to Susan Mary Holman, who was born November 24, 1848, in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, daughter of Richard and Elizabeth (Edwards) Holman, natives of Cornwall, England. Mr. Holman was a contractor and coal operator and spent most of his life in Schuylkill county, where he died in 1873, aged fifty-one years. Mrs. Prosser's mother died when Susan Mary was but eight or nine years of age and she was reared to womanhood in the family of her grandmother. Besides Mrs. Prosser there were four children in her parents' family, a brother Richard and three children who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Prosser have been the parents of three children, namely: Charles Richard, born July 20, 1873, who is cashier of the Seymour State Bank, married Kate Lampson, daughter of Charles Lampson; Howard Edgar, born December 13, 1875, resides in Green Bay; and Nellie, born April 16, 1882, resides at home.

JOHN MAURER, a well known public official and business man of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is conducting a first-class general store at the corner of College avenue and State street, was born in the Third Ward, Appleton, at No. 1084 Eighth street, September 11, 1872, a son of Joseph and Anna (Bauer) Maurer, natives of Germany. The parents of Mr. Maurer came to the United States June 4, 1857, locating in Appleton, Mr. Maurer's father securing employment in the Government service for a time and later entering the employ of George Kreiss, who was proprietor of a hub and spoke factory. He continued with Mr. Kreiss for eighteen years, and on May 14, 1909, his death occurred, after he had lived retired for some years. His widow still survives him and makes her home in the old family residence. They had nine children, of whom eight still survive. John Maurer secured his education in the Parochial school, and in 1884 began to work at twenty-five cents per day in the shoe factory. Later he went to work for the Atlas Pulp mill, where he received a salary of from $90 to $120 per month, and during the four years he worked there saved $500. He then went to high school and business college, and in 1892 opened a grocery store with Miles Kavanaugh, then alderman of the Third Ward, but a few months later sold out, and until 1896 clerked for M. Nitschke. His next business venture was with his brother, George, with whom he conducted a grocery store, dry goods establishment and general store until January 23, 1907, when the building and stock were destroyed by fire, at a time when the business was flourishing, thirteen clerks being employed and five horses used in making deliveries, and the firm was at this time dissolved. John Maurer then bought the corner building at College avenue and State street, where he has since conducted a general store. In 1898 he was elected alderman, to which office he was re-elected in 1900. He is now a member of the Fire and Police Commission. He and Mrs. Maurer are members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and he is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, St. Joseph's Society, the Equitable Fraternal Union and the Elks. On May 14, 1895, Maurer was married to Margaret Schuh, born in Hartford, Wisconsin, and they have had six children: Leona, Raymond, Lucille, Marcella, Herron and Anita.

FRED N. TORREY, cashier of the Bank of Hortonville, and one of the leading citizens of the village, is engaged in the real estate business, deals in cigars as a wholesaler, and is connected with various other business enterprises. He is a son of Samuel C. Torrey, who was born in Massachusetts, September 19, 1839, of Pilgrim descent. In young manhood Samuel C. Torrey learned the trade of carder and for a time worked in the woolen mills of the Eastern States, but becoming discouraged with the outlook for a successful career, he emigrated to the West in 1854, locating in New London, Wisconsin, where he took up 160 acres of Government land, heavily timbered, where he developed a fine farm. In June, 1881, he enlisted in Company E, Sixth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, under Captain Moster, "the Iron Brigade" and they joined the Army of the Potomac, participating in many bloody battles, including the engagements at Antietam and Gettysburg. In September, 1864, he re-enlisted in Company A, First Wisconsin Cavalry, and with that organization served until the close of hostilities, when he returned to his farm. Fred N. Torrey was born in Bovina township, June 4, 1863, and his boyhood was spent on his father's farm. He attended the local country school until 11 years of age and the following two winters went to work for neighbors after finishing his home work and for two weeks plowing received four dollars. The next summer he worked out for fifteen dollars per month for six months and gave his father eighty-five dollars, the greater part of the remaining five dollars being spent for a pair of boots. That winter he went into the woods where he drove a team and engaged in hauling logs, and most of this money he gave to his father, saving out twenty dollars with which he bought a colt. This he put out to pasture on his father's farm, and the latter sold the animal six months later for fifty dollars. During the next winter Mr. Torrey went to Florence and began to work in a drug store, but eventually he left for the woods and during the next summer again worked on a farm. Later on when he had given about $300 to his father, the latter gave him his time and in the fall he again went into the woods to work. He continued to work on farms in the summers and in the woods in winter until 1882, when he opened a drug store which was destroyed by fire in 1887, taking nearly everything Mr. Torrey had saved. Nothing daunted, he accepted a position as traveling salesman for Charles Wright & Company, dealers in pharmaceutical goods, and after traveling two or three years on commission he was given a contract on salary to cover the Pacific Coast trade which he worked at for eight years, making several trips each year to the Pacific Coast. In 1891 he gave up this position. and entered the wholesale cigar business at Hortonville, and he now has two traveling salesmen. At the time of the reorganization of the Bank of Hortonville, Mr. Torrey bought stock, and soon thereafter was elected a director, and in 1902 he in company with G. A. Zuehlke started a bank at Shiocton under the name of Torrey & Zuehlke. In 1903 he was appointed cashier of the Hortonville Bank, a position which he still holds and he also deals in real estate and has numerous other interests. Although his business affairs have kept Mr. Torrey exceptionally busy, he has still found time to serve his community in positions of an official nature, it being his contention that every man owes something to his village and his county, and he has served as a member of the village school board, as village clerk, postmaster and Chairman of the County Republican Committee. He is connected fraternally with the Modern Woodmen of America and is a charter member of the Equitable Fraternal Union. In 1884 Mr. Torrey was married to Esther Van Alstine, daughter of James and Emily Van Alstine, early settlers of this locality, and to this union there were born the following children: Freda E., Bessie B., Ruth, Donald F., Esther M. and Theodore S. Mrs. Torrey died June 2, 1909, in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which she was a devout member.

HERMAN A. KAMPS, president of the jewelry firm of H. A. Kamps Company, Incorporated, has been a well-known figure in the jewelry trade of this section for a number of years. He was born in Appleton, Wisconsin, March 8, 1865, a son of Gerhard and Katherine (Jansen) Kamps, who were born near the Rhine, Germany. They came to the United States during the '50s and located in Appleton about 1861, where Mr. Kamps engaged in the harness business until a few years prior to his death. He was a well-known and highly esteemed business citizen, and retired in comfortable circumstances. His death occurred September 14, 1893, and that of Katherine (Jansen) Kamps, April 20, 1873. They had a family of five children and Mr. Kamnps also had five children by a second marriage. Herman A. Kamps attended the public and high schools of Appleton, as well as the parochial school, and his first experience in the jewelry business was as clerk with L. M. Follett, in whose employ he continued two years. He then took a business course, and during the following nine years was employed by Max Mayer, at Appleton. For several years thereafter he was employed in different jewelry estabishments in this city, and at Milwaukee, but eventually returned to Mr. Mayer's employ, and at the time of the latter's death, in 1892, he bought a half interest in the business, the firm name becoming Mayer & Kamps. This connection continued for several years, when Mr. Kamps bought out the Mayer interest and formed the firm of H. A. Kamps Company, Incorporated, with himself as president and treasurer, M. C. Kamps as vice-president, and J. H. Bedessem as secretary. This business was established in 1880 in Appleton by Max Mayer, and is one of the old and reliable firms of the city. Under Mr. Kamps' management the business has increased steadily and now takes front rank with other Appleton jewelry houses. Kamps and his family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and he holds membership in the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Catholic Knights and St. Joseph's Society. On June 10, 1890, Mr. Kamps was married to Mary C. Bedessem, daughter of M. and Barbara (Bain) Bedessem, and they have had five children, namely: Barbara, Celia, Harold, Ralph and Laurine.

ORLANDO NAGREEN, who is cultivating eighty acres of farming land situated in section 5, Maine township, is a native of DeKalb county, Illinois, where he was born November 19, 1862, a son of Joseph and Sarah (Thompson) Nagreen. Joseph Nagreen, who was a native of Austria, came to America in the early '50s, settling in Illinois. From Sycamore, that State, he enlisted at the outbreak of the Civil War, in Company F, Twentieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, serving three years. Mr. Nagreen had previously seen three and one-half years' service in the Austrian army, during which he had never been wounded, but during the Civil War he received a wrist wound in addition to suffering a sun-stroke. After the war he engaged in his trade of cabinet-making until his eyesight failed, about 1885, and he is now living retired in Appleton, at the age of eighty-seven years. His wife, who is a native of Pennsylvania, is seventy-seven years old, and they have been the parents of ten children, of whom Orlando was the fifth in order of birth. At the age of twelve years Orlando Nagreen commenced working for wages on the farms in the vicinity of this home, continuing thus until he was nineteen years old, when he began the manufacture of wooden pumps, also drilling artesian wells, and so continued for about eight years. He then went into the mines east of Ironwood, where he operated a steam drill for a company in Appleton one year. In June, 1889, Mr. Nagreen purchased his present farm, which was mostly wild land at that time, but he now has sixty acres under cultivation and twenty acres of wood land, his farm being neatly fenced with barbed and woven wire. His basement barn was built in the summer of 1902 and his present residence was built during his second year on this place, but he intends to replace this with a new one in the near future. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising, making a specialty of dairying and hog raising. He is a member of the Fraternal Reserve Association, as is also his wife, and is a Republican in politics, having served for two years as supervisor of his township. On August 2, 1890, Mr. Nagreen was married to Mrs. Addie Diemel, who was born July 29, 1866, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Allen. She is the widow of Jacob Diemel, and had two children by her first marriage: George, of Aniwa, Wisconsin; and Orville, married and living in Outagamie county, the father of one child. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Nagreen, of whom one died in infancy; Sarah Margaret was born November 18, 1895; and Raymond Artie was born February 13, 1903.

JOHN A. LAMBIE, of the town of Kaukauna, is one of nine children, Andrew A., James A., Mary, Elizabeth, John A. and Thomas, twins, William, Margarette and Hugh, born to John and Margarette (Aird) Lambie who were both natives of Scotland. The father, John Lambie, was born September 15, 1823, and together with his wife and two oldest children immigrated to the United States. They settled near Kaukauna, Wisconsin, but after a short time, in 1862, purchased what is now known as the Lambie homestead. Here Lambie lived until 1903, honored and respected for his many sterling qualities, when he removed to the city of Kaukauna and here died in 1911, at eighty-seven years of age. His first wife died in 1876, and in 1877 Mr. Lambie married Kersina Hansen by whom he became the father of six children, as follows: Ellen, Jennie, George, Bertha, Frank and Bessie. John A. Lambie, the immediate subject of this sketch, was born September 15, 1860, in the town of Kaukauna. He was educated in the neighboring public schools and was reared to manhood on his father's farm. Following this he worked five winters in the woods at lumbering and during the summers was employed as a farm hand. When 22 years old, with his brother, Thomas, he bought his present farm, and three years later purchased his brother's interest and added 60 acres to the original tract. This he has improved materially until it has become one of the best farming properties in the community. In 1884 he was united in marriage with Miss Anna, daughter of Avery Grant, a native of New England and one of the early settlers of the town of Ellington, where Mrs. Lambie was born. Mr. and Mrs. Lambie are among the best people of Outagamie county, and they are the parents of the following named children: Roy, Fay, Erle. Fern, Dean and Dana.

PHILLIP SASSMANN, of Black Creek township, Outagamie county, is operating the old Sassmann family homestead, which has been in the family for nearly forty years, and which was developed from the virgin soil, his father having purchased it when it was nearly all wild property. Phillip Sassmann was born April 13, 1878, on this place, and is a son of John and Sophia (Hominghouse) Sassmann, natives of Germany. The parents of Mr. Sassmann were married in New York State, and in about 1872 came to Wisconsin, Mr. Sassmann taking up eighty acres of land in section 21, Black Creek township, which had been but partly cultivated. Here John Sassmann spent the remainder of his life engaged in general farming and stock raising, his death occurring October 6, 1910, and that of his wife in July, 1893, and both are buried in the Black Creek Cemetery. They had a family of nine children, and of these Phillip Sassmann is the youngest.

Phillip Sassmann secured his education in the common schools of Black Creek township, and as soon as he was able began to assist his father in the duties of the home farm. At the time of his father's death, he secured sixty acres of the old homestead, and in addition to this he owns another tract of forty acres, and he now has fifty-seven acres under the plow. Mr. Sassmann farms along scientific lines and specializes in barley and dairy products. His property is well kept, being thoroughly fenced and drained, and is considered one of the good, productive farms of this section. Politically a Replublican, Mr. Sassmann has always been active in the interests of his party, and he has been especially interested in educational matters, now serving as clerk of the school board. In his religious belief he is an adherent of the faith of the Evangelical Church, and he and Mrs. Sassmann attend St. John's church of that denomination.

In 1903 Mr. Sassmann was united in marriage to Miss Emma Hanf, who was born November 22, 1878, the eldest of the five children of Michael and Mary (Sitz) Hanf, natives of Germany and Canada, respectively, who were married in Outagamie county, Wisconsin and are now residing in Center township. Mr. and Mrs. Sassmann have had no children.

EMORY STANSBURY, M. D., deceased, for many years was a prominent physician of Appleton, Wisconsin, where he was professionally trusted and honored and personally held in the highest esteem. He was born at Baltimore, Maryland, August 28, 1839, and died at his home in Appleton, April 3, 1899, a son of Rev. Daniel and Gertrude (Milemon) Stansbury. His parents came to Wisconsin in 1851, where his father was a pioneer Methodist preacher. Of the ten children of the family, Emory was the sixth in order of birth. The father died at Janesville, Wisconsin, in 1860, at that time being the presiding elder of the Janesville district. In the same year Emory Stansbury graduated from the Janesville High School, after which, for some months, he taught school and began the study of medicine. His studies were interrupted, however, by the outbreak of war in the following year, and in 1861 he enlisted in the First Wisconsin Cavalry and after a time was appointed hospital steward, in which capacity he served for thirteen months, when he was discharged on account of disability. He then devoted himself to his medical studies under the supervision of Dr. N. M. Dodson, of Berlin, and subsequently was graduated at the Long Island Medical College, in Brooklyn, and still later at the Bellevue Medical College, in New York. Returning to Wisconsin he practised prior to 1868, at Berlin and Winneconne, when he located permanently at Appleton, where the remainder of a busy, useful and beneficent life was spent. For many years preceding his death he was a prominent member of the boards of trustees of the Methodist Church and Lawrence University. He was a member of the county, state and American Medical Associations, and at different times served on charitable committees and benevolent boards. In his last illness, which he knew to be a fatal one, he set an example of patience and courage which was as admirable as it was remarkable. His chief care seemed to be for his family, their grief distressing him more than his sufferings. His death was made the occasion of numerous memorials and newspaper articles, among these being a glowing tribute to his worth as physician, man and citizen which was written by Dr. J. T. Reeve and read at the annual meeting of the Fox River Valley Medical Society and placed on record. Dr. Stansbury belonged to the Masonic fraternity. On June 13, 1872, Dr. Stansbury was married to Mrs. Mary A. P. Humphrey, a daughter of Samuel C. and Lorian (Sheldon) Phinney. They were natives of New York and came to Wisconsin in 1853, the father of Mrs. Stansbury being a retired minister. Stansbury has one sister, Mrs. W. D. Mason, who is a resident also of Appleton. To Dr. and Mrs. Stansbury three children were born, namely: Clara, who is a graduate of Lawrence College, is a teacher in the Appleton High School and resides with her mother; Karl Emory and George Jay, both graduates of Lawrence College, connected with the Thilmany Paper and Pulp Company of Kaukauna, and reside at home.

WALTER VAN ASTEN, who owns and operates the well known Van Asten homestead farm, situated on Little Chute Rural Route No. 9, in Vandenbroek township, is one of the leading agriculturists of his section. He was born March 26, 1862, on the farm he now operates, a son of John Van Asten, who was born May 3, 1815, in Wauroy, Holland. John Van Asten came to the United States in 1851, in which year he purchased land in what was then known as Kaukauna township, now Vandenbroek, which was then all covered with timber. Building a little log cabin, as was the custom of the pioneers, from logs cut from his own land, he commenced cultivating his property, and he continued to operate here until his death, August 15, 1902, at which time he was the owner of a well cultivated property equipped with good buildings, and one of the leading men of his township, having served as treasurer of his school district for many years. In 1852 he was married to Petronella Verhagen, who was born in Holland, August 16, 1823, and she died December 30, 1896. They had nine children, as follows: Gertrude, Cornelia, Katherine who died aged eight years; Martin, Mary, Walter, Albert, Cornelius and Johannah. Walter Van Asten received his education in the district schoolhouse, which was situated on one corner of his father's farm, and as a lad he worked on the homestead, being reared to agricultural pursuits, and having instilled in him those traits of industry and right living that have characterized his whole life and helped to make his undertakings successful. In 1889, at the age of twenty-seven years, with his brother Albert he bought the home property from his father, but a few years later he purchased his brother's interest, and he has since conducted the farm alone, being engaged in general farming and dairy work. He has erected new buildings on the property since taking charge, and has brought the land into a high state of cultivation, until now the tract compares favorably with any of its size in the county. In 1890 Mr. Van Asten was married to Miss Katherine Vandehey, who was born in Brown county, Wisconsin, daughter of Henry and Adriana (Vanderloop) Vandehey, natives of Holland, the former born June 11, 1829, and died June 14, 1905, and the latter born August 27, 1836, and died October 28, 1910. Eleven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Van Asten, of whom two are deceased, John and Arnold. Those who survive are Nellie, Henry, Jennie, John (II), Hattie, Arnold (II), Martin, Annie and Albert. The family is connected with St. John's Catholic Church of Little Chute.

GERHARD T. MOESKES, ex-Judge of Outagamie county, whose long and faithful public service entitles him to the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens, was born January 18, 1846, in the Rhine Province, Prussia, a son of Herman and Maria (Geeren) Moeskes. Herman Moeskes was born April 10, 1817, in Holland, and in his native country was employed as a coachman and hunter by a nobleman, also owning a small farm in Rhein, Prussia. In 1860 he came to the United States with his family on the sailing vessel "Daniel Webster," the journey lasting forty-seven days. He had married in 1844, Maria Geeren, and there were ten children born to this union, of whom Judge Moeskes is the eldest, there being two surviving children. On coming to the United States, Herman Moeskes settled in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and there continued to reside until his death, April 28, 1894, his wife having passed away in 1866. Gerhard T. Moeskes received an excellent educational training in the schools of his native land, and he was fourteen years of age at the time when he accompanied the family to America. On account of the ill-health of his father, the eldest son was given but few advantages in his youth, early starting to work at whatever employment offered itself, his principal occupation being wood chopping in the lumber woods. He next secured a position as bookkeeper and lumber scaler, and at the age of twenty years he learned the carpenter's trade, but after two years took up the insurance business in Manitowoc, and shortly afterward, in 1868, moved to Appleton, which city he had for headquarters during the time he was traveling for an insurance company. In April, 1874, he returned from a trip to find out from his wife that he had been elected to the office of justice of the peace, and during the spring of 1876 he started to study law in the office of Collins & Pierce. Later in the same year he was elected clerk of the Circuit Court, but during the eight years in which he was an incumbent of that office he never ceased his law studies, and in 1884 he was admitted to the bar. He commenced the practice of law in Appleton, as a partner of Humphrey Pierce, and in 1889 he was elected County Judge, being reelected in 1893 and for two terms following, his incumbency of that office covering a period of twelve years. Judge Moeskes' administration of the office distinguished him as a man of far more than the ordinary ability, and he established a reputation of being in all things just; no one can say of him that he was ever prejudiced, nor can any one point to a single instance where favor has been shown. That he served the people of Outagamie county in this trying and difficult period for twelve years without the slightest blotch to mar his record is an achievement which should be gratifying to him and of which his family may justly speak with pride in the years to come. Judge Moeskes has been a representative of steamship companies during the past forty years, and now looks after the interests of the International Merchant Marine, Hamburg, North German Lloyd, Holland and American lines. During his youth he worked with Charles Graves, who is now manager of The Fair, in Chicago, and a warm friendship has existed between the two men throughout their lives. Since 1902 Judge Moeskes has been engaged in a large law practice in Appleton. He is a consistent member of the Catholic Church, and was one of the organizers and charter members of Branch No. 6, Catholic Knights of Wisconsin, an insurance organization of which he was president for ten years, during which time it increased its membership from the five original organizers to 155, when he declined a re-election. As an appreciation of the excellent service he had given to the order, Judge Moeskes was presented with a gold-mounted, properly-inscribed cane. He was one of the organizers and for six years treasurer of the Appleton Building and Loan Association; one of the organizers and directors and secretary of the Union Toy and Furniture Company; one of the organizers and directors of the Appleton Straw Board Company, in none of which he is now connected in any way; and one of the organizers of the Citizens' National Bank of Appleton, of which he is a director. Judge Moeskes is a Democrat in his political views, and during 1880 and 1881 he served as a member of the city council. Judge Moeskes was married in 1869 to Miss Maria P. Kamps, of Appleton, the youngest of a family of thirteen children, whose father was a native of the village in which Judge Moeskes was born in Prussia, and who came to Appleton in 1860. A tanner by trade, he erected the first tannery in the town, and died in 1872, his widow surviving him one year. There were seven children born to Judge and Mrs. Moeskes, as follows: two who died in infancy; Agnes, who died in 1892, when twenty-one years old; William, who died in October, 1893, when sixteen years old; Herman E., former register of probate in Outagamie county, and now residing in Colorado; Katie M., who married E. W. Sacksteder of the firm of Kamps & Sacksteder, druggists of Appleton; and Elizabeth, who lives in Los Angeles, California. The mother of these children died August 13, 1894, aged forty-six years, in the faith of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, of which she had been a member for many years.

JAMES D. KEELAN, a well-known farmer of the town of Kaukauna, was born February 29, 1864, in Canada. Michael Keelan, his father, was a son of James Keelan, and both were natives of Ireland. The family immigrated to America in 1840, first settling in Vermont, where they engaged in agricultural pursuits. Later the home of the family was established in Canada. Michael Keelan was born in 1833, and was one of a family of seven children. Upon the death of his father, James Keelan, he came with his widowed mother, whose maiden name was Mary Mohan, to the United States in 1865, and settled in Wisconsin. Here his mother died in 1885 at seventy-six years of age. Michael Keelan married Sarah Donley, a native of Toronto, Ontario, and they walked north from Kaukauna to the McCabe farm and purchased land upon which they erected their first home, a log cabin. Their land was heavily timbered, but this was eventually cleared by hand. In the course of time the rude cabin was replaced by a more modern one; economy enabled them to procure utensils befitting the times, and they gradually prospered in material welfare and in the esteem of their neighbors. In 1902, Mr. and Mrs. Keelan moved to the city of Kaukauna, where Mr. Keelan died in 1907, aged seventy-four years, and is yet survived by his widow at the age of sixty-seven. They were the parents of ten children, four of whom are now living, viz.: James D., Mary, John A. and Bernard J. James D. Keelan, the subject of this sketch, received all his scholastic training in the Dent School, at Snyderville. He remained on the home farm until twenty-three years old, then married Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph and Rose (Delima) Houle. The parents of Mrs. Keelan came from Canada to Brown county, Wisconsin, in the '50s, and both died in 1906, the father aged seventy-seven and the mother seventy-one. James D. Keelan bought land near the old homestead after his marriage, but one year later moved to Oshkosh, where he worked at his trade of carpenter six years. He then returned to Outagamie county, and has since resided on his present farm. Mr. Keelan has held several town offices, among which were supervisor four years, treasurer six years and school clerk nine years. He and his wife are the parents of eight children: Rose, James, Arthur, Elizabeth, Sarah, Earl, Henry, Ruth and Camilla. The family belong to St. Paul's Roman Catholic Church at Wrightstown.

DAVID E. REESE, secretary of the Combined Locks Paper Company and of the Green Bay and Mississippi Canal Company, and treasurer of the Fox River Telephone and Telegraph Company, is one of the leading business citizens of Appleton, Wisconsin, and has been prominently identified with some of its large business enterprises. Mr. Reese was born in Neenah, Wisconsin, March 14, 1855, a son of Thomas and Jane (Jones) Reese, natives of Wales, who came to the United States in 1846 and located in Pennsylvania. Two years later they came west to Neenah, among the early settlers, and here Thomas Reese engaged in various occupations, eventually becoming connected with the Kimberly Flour Mills. In 1898, he removed to Appleton, where his death occurred in 1902, his widow surviving him but one year. These good people were consistent members of the Methodist Church. They had four children, as follows: Thomas, who died in 1902, was clerk of Appleton at the time of his death; Annie, who died at the age of fourteen years; David E.; and an infant who died aged two years. David E. Reese received a public school education in Neenah, and at the age of fifteen years began to work for himself as clerk in the Neenah post office. For two years he clerked in a store at Lima, Ohio, and on his return to his native place he found employment in the mills until 1878, at which time he came to Appleton, and in 1878 went to work in the paper mill. He then spent two and one-half years in Colorado, after which he returned to Appleton, where he has been prominently identified with the paper business ever since. He was connected with the interests of J. S. Van Nortwick at Kaukauna for a number of years; beginning in 1885, and he is now one of the executives of the Van Nortwick estate. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Order of Elks, and his political convictions are those of the Republican party. In 1882 Mr. Reese was married to Miss Katherine Jones, of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, and to this union there were born two children: Harry B. and Mary E.

HUBERT FASSBENDER, who owns and operates the largest cheese factory in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, located in Ellington township, is one of the leading business citizens of his section and is a son of one of the pioneers of the county, Peter Fassbender, who was born December 22, 1838, in Prussia, and came to the United States in 1856. Peter Fassbender was for many years engaged in agricultural pursuits in Ellington township, but is now living a retired life in the city of Appleton. He married Elizabeth Nettekoven, and they had a family of nine children, Hubert being the sixth in order of birth. He was born April 30, 1875, on the old homestead farm in Ellington township, and received his education in the district schools of his neighborhood. When only fourteen years of age he began to learn the cheese making trade in his father's factory, where he worked up to ten years ago. In 1901 Mr. Fassbender bought the plant, building the present fine property from the old one, the main factory being located near Mr. Fassbender's residence, while the branch factory is two miles west and one-half mile south. He secures his milk from the farmers of this township, and ships his product all over the country, Appleton being the principal distributing point. Mr. Fassbender is an able business man, and it has been through his hard work and good management that the factory has become the largest in Outagamie county. Mr. Fassbender was married to Anna Schammer, daughter of Carl and Charlotta Schammer, and three children have been born to this union: Clement, who died at the age of four months; Mabel and Gertrude. Mr. and Mrs. Fassbender are consistent members of the Roman Catholic Church at Greenville.

HON. JOHN GOODLAND, whose many years of efficient service on the Circuit Court bench entitle him to the highest degree of consideration from his fellow citizens of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, was born at Taunton, Somersetshire, England, August 10, 1831, a son of William and Abigail (Sharman) Goodland. Until he was eighteen years of age John Goodland was mainly occupied with school duties, and he left the academy in his native town with very creditable papers testifying to his standing as a student. Coming to the United States in 1849, he located in Oneida county, New York, and from there came to Sharon, Walworth county, Wisconsin, in 1854. Here he embraced the opportunities then offered to willing and ambitious young men, and taught school, was a clerk in a store, served for several years as justice of the peace and in several other town offices, making friends in all lines of business. The grocery store with which he was connected was burned, and soon after, in 1864, he secured a railroad clerkship which necessitated his removal to Chicago, where he remained with the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad until 1867, when he moved to Appleton as agent for the same road. Seven years were devoted to the interests of this company, then he resigned, entering into the insurance business and beginning the study of law, for which profession he had always had a strong leaning. In 1879, he was admitted to practice in the District and Circuit courts, and in 1888 he was elected District Attorney, prior to which he had been associated in the practice of law with Hon. Lyman E. Barnes, who later became a member of Congress. Judge Goodland served in the arduous office of district attorney until 1891, when he became a candidate for Circuit Judge of the Tenth Judicial Circuit, to which office he was elected. Prior to taking his seat in 1892, however, a vacancy was caused on the bench and Governor Peck appointed Judge Goodland to serve out the unexpired term. In 1897 he was re-elected without opposition, and again in 1903 and 1909. As a judge he has filled out the measure of his high office. Possessing the robustness of an English ancestry, he owns also many of the mental qualities which have made Englishmen notable in whatever land their activities have been engaged. In political preference he is a Democrat and his influence has been given to advancing the interests of that party, but he is broad-minded and on many occasions has been identified with other earnest men irrespective of party in movements for the general welfare. September 4, 1850, Judge Goodland was married in New York to Miss Caroline Clark, who died in 1893, the mother of nine children, five of whom survive. One son, Walter S., is mayor of Racine, Wisconsin. John, Jr., is a member of the city council of Appleton, Wisconsin. Judge Goodland is a Mason and formerly was master of the lodge at Appleton.

CHARLES G. HERMAN, who is now operating the old Herman homestead in section 29, Cicero township, which was first settled by his father many years ago, is one of the enterprising and progressive farmers of this section. He was born on the property which he is now operating, January 11, 1874, and is a son of Charles G. and Louisa (Noach) Herman, who are both now living at Black Creek, retired from activities. Charles G. Herman, Jr., received his education in the district schools of Cicero township, and was reared to the life of an agriculturist, his boyhood and youth being spent on the home farm, which, in fact, he has never left. He bought eighty acres of land adjoining that of the old homestead when he had attained manhood, and later purchased the home farm itself, but since that time he has disposed of forty acres and now is cultivating 120 acres, which he devotes to general farming and the raising of good blooded stock. When Mr. Herman's father first came to this section of the county, the farm was but a wilderness, the original buildings on the property being a log cabin, 18x20 feet, and a log stable, 20x24 feet, which forms somewhat of a comparison to the present handsome residence of twelve rooms, thoroughly equipped with all modern conveniences, the eight-room house adjoining it, the basement barn, 40x70 feet, and the hay barn, 22x50 feet. Other improvements made have been correspondingly great, and the farm is now one of the finest of its size in Cicero township. Mr. Herman was married in February, 1896, to Anna Trams, who was born in New York, and came to Wisconsin with her parents. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Herman, namely: Clara, Elma, Harvey, Lydia and Dora.

HON. GEORGE C. JONES, whose business activities have long identified him with the natural resources of the country, particularly in mineral and timber land interests in Michigan, Wisconsin and Oregon, is a member of the Appleton bar and is known and honored also by his fellow citizens as a philanthropist. He was born at Barry, Orleans county, New York, October 1, 1829, and is a son of William C. and Lucy (Strong) Jones, and grandson and great-grandson of William Jones. The Jones family originated in Wales, and from there the great-grandfather came to America, locating at Saybrook, Connecticut, where he was married and engaged in agricultural pursuits. William Jones, the second, was born in Saybrook, Connecticut, and at the age of sixteen years became a volunteer in the Patriot Army and served for seven years as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, being at Fort Ticonderoga with General Ethan Allen. He was present also at the surrender of General Burgoyne. From an undersized lad who had difficulty in being accepted by the recruiting officer, he grew into a man of large stature and of miilitary carriage and manly vigor. After the war was over and his services no longer needed, he returned to Saybrook and shortly afterward married Esther Clark. After some changes of residence they settled at Middlebury, New York, where he engaged in farming and milling and lived to be ninety-three years of age. William Clark Jones, father of George Clark Jones, one of the eight children of the Revolutionary soldier, was born in 1800 and died in 1883. After his marriage to Lucy Strong, he moved to Orleans county, New York, buying a tract of land in Barry township, where the family continued to reside until 1842, when they moved to Oakland county, Michigan. At that time Oakland county was more or less a wilderness, and life on the farm in Springfield township included all the trials and hardships incident to pioneer life. William C. Jones survived his wife ten years. Both were members of the Presbyterian Church. Seven children were born to them and those who reached mature years were: Caroline R., George C., William S. and Mary J. While a resident of New York Mr. Jones assisted in the construction of the Erie Canal, which was then considered a marvelous piece of engineering. George Clark Jones from the age of thirteen years was reared on his father's Michigan farm. His education was not neglected, but at that time in Springfield township country boys had to be satisfied with the instruction they could secure in the winter months only. This particular country boy was probably more ambitious than most of his schoolmates, and when he had reached the age of twenty-one decided to begin his preparation for a legal career, entering the law office of Judge A. C. Baldwin in Pontiac, Michigan. He. continued his studies with other able members of the profession, and in 1853 was admitted to the bar. In the following September he located in the Lake Superior copper country, at Ontanagon, Michigan, where he continued to practice some sixteen years. He then came to Appleton, Wisconsin, the change of residence being because he wished his children to have the best educational advantages possible. During the forty-three years that Mr. Jones has been a resident of this city he has in many ways identified himself with the best interests. For a few years he practiced law, but for a long period his larger interests have been connected with real estate and tracts of land, largely mineral, in different sections of the country. In politics he is a Republican, as was his father, who, in his early political life, was a Whig. During his residence in Michigan Mr. Jones was quite active in public affairs, served in the office of district attorney of Ontonagon county, Judge of Probate and subsequently in the State Legislature. He was first married to Elizabeth Hannah Weller, in 1854, and she died in June, 1895. He then married Lucy Sprague Rhodes, who died in 1907, and his third union, in December, 1909, was with Camilla (Wheelwright) Davis, and they reside in the pleasant old home on Prospect street. Mr. Jones has had a family of five children, namely: Charles W., an attorney practicing in Nevada; George C., now deceased; Fred W., who secured his medical education in one of the great schools of Chicago, died in January, 1907; William S., who resides in San Jose, California; and Edward G., an attorney of Appleton. Mr. Jones is an active member of the Congregational Church. Although many of his business interests are at a distance, Appleton is his home and he has recognized this fact by many public-spirited acts and beneficent deeds. He donated land for a city park in the heart of Appleton, and feels great pleasure and pride in the Free Public Library which he was instrumental in starting. He and his first wife, Elizabeth H. Jones, being deeply interested in the welfare of the young people, started the work of a Free Public Library and Reading Room in a very modest way, which later developed into the present very beautiful library building. It was built by the city for a Free Public Library and City Hall and dedicated in 1900. Mr. Jones has been president of the Library Board ever since its organization, and each year has contributed to it many books. He has great hopes of some day seeing an art gallery and museum connected with the library. He plans giving to it several valuable pictures and a collection of specimens he has for years been gathering. For the purpose of encouraging free public libraries in the county, Mr. Jones has given small libraries to nearly every township in the county, some of which have grown to be a credit to the town where they were started. He also started the movement to secure a soldier's monument to be located on Market street in front of the library and city hall, spending several months in the work, and afterwards Mr. A. W. Priest very generously came forward and donated the beautiful bronze monument to the Grand Army. Mr. Jones recently contributed the furnishings for the George C. Jones Y. M. C. A. hall in Brokaw Hall, the beautiful new dormitory for Lawrence University boys. Having retired from active business life he is enjoying a well-earned rest in this, the evening of his life. He delights in travel, and in 1910 he and Mrs. Jones spent five months abroad, visiting Athens, Constantinople, Jerusalem, Cairo, Rome and several other cities of Europe---a most charming trip.

ANTON RITGER, whose popular hotel, the Hotel Ritger, is well known to the Wisconsin traveling public, is one of the self-made citizens of Appleton, who has won success in life entirely through his own efforts, having had neither the advantage of exceptional educational training, influential backing nor financial assistance to start him on his career. Mr. Ritger was born March 28, 1851, in Washington county, Wisconsin, a son of John and Margaret (Berchold) Ritger, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1843 and located in Washington county, where John Ritger'engaged in farming during the remainder of his life. Mr. and Mrs. Ritger had five children, as follows: Katherine; Michael, a resident of Hortonville, Wisconsin; Anton; Theodore, deceased; and Jacob, who is living in Washington county. After attending the common schools of Washington county, Anton Ritger tired of the work of the home farm, and at the age of thirteen years became a grocer's clerk for two years, after which he learned the trade of carriage maker, at which occupation he worked in various shops in Neenah and Milwaukee. In 1871 he decided to enter the business on his own account, and for two years conducted a business at Hortonville, after which he returned to Milwaukee and for the next five years worked for others. He came to Appleton in 1877, and for two years thereafter had charge of the Pardee shop, then purchasing a farm in Ellington township, which he cultivated during the next three seasons. In 1881 he sold out, returned to Appleton, and invested his money in real estate, also engaging in the carriage making business until 1892, and built up a business that demanded the employment of fifteen men, but in the year last mentioned he sold this enterprise, together with his real estate, and during the following year started building the Hotel Ritger, which he doubled in size in 1906. The popularity of this hostelry may be seen when it is known that the capacity of the house, seventy-five guests, is constantly taxed. It is modern in every way, having every up-to-date convenience, and Mr. Ritger is an ideal host, his constant attention being given to the welfare and comfort of his guests. He is a strong Republican in politics, and has served as county treasurer two years, as alderman of the Second Ward, and for three years was chief of the Fire Department. Fraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows and the Sons of Herman. Mr. Ritger was married in 1875 to Miss Dora Wunderlich, who was born in 1857 in Outagamie county, daughter of Simon and Mary (Berch) Wunderlich, natives of Germany and early settlers of Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, from whence they removed to a farm in Outagamie county. Of the three children born to Mr. and Mrs. Ritger, Theodore and Mamie are deceased, and Arthur is serving as clerk in his father's hotel.

HIRAM G. FREEMAN, president of the Commercial National Bank of Appleton, Wisconsin, and identified with other important business interests of this city, was born January 3, 1844, at Concord, New Hampshire, and is a son of Rev. Hiram and Adeline W. (Guernsey) Freeman. The parents of Mr. Freeman were natives of Vermont, and from there, in 1846, they came to Wisconsin, the father in the capacity of a home missionary of the Congregational Church. For a time the family lived at Potosi, but in 1849 moved to Oshkosh, where Mr. Freeman was the pastor of the First Congregational Church. A man of scholarly attainments, he was particularly interested in educational work and was one of the organizers of what is now Ripon College, at Ripon, Wisconsin, to which place he removed in 1858. Subsequently he served churches in both Illinois and Iowa, and when he had reached an honored old age passed away at Sioux City, Iowa. His father, Captain Constant Freeman, was a Revolutionary soldier and a son of Sergeant Joseph Freeman, who removed from Sudbury, Massachusetts, to Preston Connecticut. To Rev. Hiram Freeman and wife three children were born, Hiram G. being the second. Hiram G. Freeman attended school wherever his father's missionary labors led the family, and completed his education at Ripon College before he was fifteen years of age, when he became self-supporting, being employed in several towns as clerk and bookkeeper. In 1864 he enlisted for service in the Civil War, entering Company B, Forty-first Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and served until his regiment was mustered out in the following September. He resumed his former business activities and remained at Oshkosh until 1867, when he removed to Green Bay to become cashier of the City National Bank at that place, which was succeeded by the Kellogg National Bank, where he continued until 1881, and at this time came to Appleton and helping to organize the Commercial National Bank of this city, he became its first cashier. In 1902 he became vice-president and in 1910 president of this financial institution, and has continued at its head, ably and successfully directing its policy. The stockholders of the bank were also largely interested in the Fox River Paper Mills. The stockholders of the paper mills asked Mr. Freeman to take charge of the management. After some time spent in the east, studying conditions, Mr. Freeman consented, and in 1899 accepted the position of treasurer and general manager. A new regime was inaugurated. Mr. Freeman raised these mills to their high standard, and steadily increased the scope of operations. The mills are kept up to date, supplied with all modern machinery, cement floors, etc. All credit must be given to the able management of Mr. Freeman, a man of few words, who commands the respect of all his employes. November 20, 1886, Mr. Freeman married Miss Susie W. Smith, of Appleton, a daughter born to the marriage of Rev. Reeder Smith and Eliza P. Kimball, natives of Pittston, Pennsylvania, and Boston, Massachusetts, who came to Wisconsin in 1849 in the interest of Lawrence University, representing Amos A. Lawrence, of Boston, for whom the college was named. Mr. and Mrs. Freeman have one daughter, Angeline Smith Freeman.

CHARLES W. WENDEL, whose fine farm of 140 acres is situated in section 11, Dale township, may be numbered among the practical agriculturists and good citizens of his community. He is a native of Dale township, where he was born September 25, 1870, and is a son of Fred and Barbara (Now) Wendel, the former a native of Germany and the latter of Canada. Mr. Wendel's parents were married in Dale township, and settled on the property now owned by their son, Charles W, at that time a wild tract of 160 acres. Here Mr. Wendel was engaged in farming until his death, March 28, 1894, when he was fifty-five years old, and his widow passed away November 1, 1909, having attained the age of sixty-five years. Both are buried in Medina Cemetery. Fred Wendel served for three years in the Civil War as a member of a Wisconsin cavalry regiment and received an injury to his back from falling from his horse, from which he never fully recovered. He was a member of the Grand Army of the Republic, and was buried with military honors. Charles W. Wendel was the next to the oldest of his parents' five children, and until he was twenty-two years old worked on the home farm. He then rented a farm for three years, after which he purchased the homestead, on which he has been operating since April, 1899. He now has about eighty acres under cultivation, neatly fenced with woven wire, and he carries on general and dairy farming, marketing his dairy products, hogs and cattle, and some grain, sugar beets and potatoes. He is breeding to Holstein cattle, milking about ten cows throughout the year, and breeds to Percheron horses. In 1910 he remodeled his residence, and the basement barn, built by his father, and which is 60x36 feet, will be remodeled in 1912. In political matters Mr. Wendel is a Republican, and he and his family attend the Lutheran Church at Hortonville. On September 5, 1894, Wendel was united in marriage with Martha Kluge, who was born November 17, 1874, the sixth of the fourteen children born to Edward and Augusta (Schmolke) Kluge, natives of Germany. Wendel's parents were married in their native country and came to America about 1880, settling in the town of Dale, where they are living at this time, Mr. Kluge being seventy-two years old and his wife sixty-six. Mr. Wendel's six children, all of whom are living at home, are as follows: Gerald, Ella, Irvin, Mata, Dora and Gilbert.

AUGUST SIEVERT, a prominent retired citizen of Outagamie county, who for many years was engaged in agricultural pursuits in the town of Freedom, was born November 30, 1850, in Germany, and is a son of John and Frederica Sievert, natives of the Fatherland, who came to the United States in 1870, with their two children, August and Wilhelmina. The family came direct to Freedom, this county, where John and August Sievert bought land in partnership and John Sievert was engaged in farming here until his death in 1891, his widow surviving him until 1907, when she passed away on the farm. August Sievert received his education in the schools of his native country and was twenty years of age when he accompanied the family to America. He was married in 1879 to Carolina Dobler, who was born in Chicago, Illinois, daughter of John Dobler, and five children were born to this union: Helena, Albert, Emma, Herman and Alma. Albert Seivert married Meta Fiesteadt, of Freedom, and has one child, Clark. Herman, who is engaged in general farming and dairy work on the homestead, married Mabel Groat. Helena married Emil Jentz, of Center. Emma married Arnold Muenster of Osborn. Mr. and Mrs. Sievert belong to the Moravian Church of Freedom, and Mr. Sievert has held the office of school director. On May 1, 1911, he retired from activities, selling his farm to his son, Herman, and built a new residence on land one mile west from the homestead. He was very successful in his farming venture, and now that he has retired can reap the fruit of his early years of labor and look back over a useful, well-spent life. He has always had the interest of his home community at heart, and any movement that has for its object the betterment or advancement of his township or county can be sure of his hearty and active support.

CONRAD A. SCHWAB, a successful farmer and stock breeder of Ellington township, belongs to a family which has been located in this section for a number of years. His grandfather, George Schwab, was born in Germany and came to the United States with his wife and two children. Two of the grandparents' children, Mary and Conrad Schwab, had preceded them to America in 1856, settling in Canada, where they worked for a month on a farm, and in 1865 came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and purchased the farm now occupied by Conrad A. Schwab in Ellington township. This property had but few improvements at that time, but Conrad Schwab was an industrious worker and able agriculturist, and in a comparatively short time had one of the well-cultivated and equipped properties of his community. He was actively engaged in farming here until his retirement, at which time he sold his land to his son, Conrad A., with whom Conrad and his wife are now living. In 1869 Conrad Schwab married Bertha Steinke, daughter of John and Minnie Steinke, who came from Germany in 1869, two weeks after which the mother died, while the father survived until 1891. Mr. and Mrs. Schwab had six children: Emma, who married Elmer Godfrey, is the mother of one child, named Eunice, and resides in Washington; John an industrious farmer of Ellington, who married Mary Chevelier, and has one daughter, Gladys; Laura, residing in Washington, the wife of Orvil Delemater; Julia, who married John Wunderlich, lived in Minnesota and died in 1902, leaving two children, Catherine and Johnnie; Conrad, who married Sophie Schumacher, daughter of August and Bertha Schumacher, of Ellington township, and has two children; Louise and Edwin; and Frida, who married Joseph Collar and lives in Green Bay, the mother of three children, Loyd, Della and Harold. The family is prominently connected with the German Lutheran Church of Ellington. Conrad A. Schwab, the present owner of the farm, is a man of agricultural ability and progressive ideas, and has been successful in his general farming and dairy work.

AUGUST ENDTER, an honored pioneer of the town of Freedom, Outagamie county, who has been identified with the growth and development of this part of the state, is a native of Germany and a son of Casper Endter, who came to this country during the Civil War with his wife, Katherine, and three children. He settled first in Milwaukee, where he lived for a few years, then spent two or three years on a rented farm in the town of Freedom, this county, and eventually bought a small farm in Grand Chute, on which he spent the remainder of his life. August Endter was born February 20, 1839, in Germany, and came to the United States prior to his parents in 1857. In 1862 he was married to Amelia Betcher, who was born in Germany, August 6, 1839, and came to the United States with her parents, Charles and Henrietta Betcher. At the time of his marriage, Mr. Endter was living in Milwaukee, and he continued to work there for five or six years, at the end of which time he came to Outagamie county and purchased the farm on which he is now living. The only clearing that had been done on this land at that time was the cutting down of a part of the timber, and the stumps of this were still in the ground. Mr. Endter's implements for clearing his land were crude and the work of developing the land was slow, but he was persevering and industrious and after a number of years began to see his land take on the appearance of a prosperous farm, but the family lived in the little original log house for twenty years before the present comfortable home was erected. Mr. Endter now has one of the best properties in this part of the township, and it has all been developed through his, own hard labor and industry. Mr. and Mrs. Endter were the parents of eleven children, one of whom is dead, Theodore, who met an accidental death in the woods when he was twenty years of age. Those who. survive are: Anna, Charles, Lena, Hettie, Bernard, Emil, Augusta, Tilla, Paulina and Frederick. Mr. and Mrs. Endter are members of the German Lutheran (St. Peter's) Church of Freedom township, and Mr. Endter is the only survivor of the thirteen men who built the first church of this congregation.

ALEX. ZENIER, pianist, organist, teacher, director and critic. Coming to Appleton a very young man in 1885 to teach piano at Lawrence College, conduct a chorus at the same institution, and act as organist and director of music at the Methodist Episcopal Church, Mr. Zenier has been a most conspicuous figure in the advancement of the cause of music not only in Appleton, but throughout the State as well, for his influence has been far-reaching, and what he has accomplished is a matter of history. He was instrumental in organizing the Mendelsohn Club in 1885, which was the first choral society established here for the study of oratorios, taking up such works as The Messiah, Creation, Elijah, Hymn of Praise, etc. Mr. H. G. Freeman was the director of the Club for a number of years, and the membership included such names as W. A. Clark, W. B. Murphy, Charles W. Mory, Charles Greenfield, George Verity, B.T. Rogers, Jr., E. P. Humphrey, Fred Wheeler, Mr. and Mrs. Max Meyer, Mrs.Foye, Mrs. Bacon, Mrs. McGillan, Mrs. Stowell, the Misses Whorton, Graham, Babcock, Mead, McGillan, etc. It was by the invitation of this organization that the Wisconsin State Music Teachers Association met here in 1886, bringing together the principal musicians of the State in a session of several days' duration, and the year following being privileged to participate in an orchestral festival in Milwaukee under the direction of Theodore Thomas. Mr. Zenier severed his connection with the college about this time and returned to New York for continued study with such masters as S. B. Mills, William Mason, Dudley Buck and Frederick Archer. Returning to Appleton in 1890 he opened a studio on College avenue, which has become famous for its many concerts and entertainments, and where have appeared for the first time in this section of the country and in most cases in any city in the State outside of Milwaukee, such artists as Emilio Gogorza, David Bispham, Schumann-Heink, the Kneisel Quartet, George Hamlin, Scharwenka, Rider-Kelsey, Christine Miller, Evan Williams, Gadski, Reed Miller, Glenn Hall, Arthur Hartman, Fannie Bloomfield Zeisler, Witherspoon, Ernest Hutcheson, Maud Powell, Elsa Ruegger, Olive Mead Quartet, Bruno Steindel, the Dolmetsches, and others too numerous to mention. These concerts (Artists' Recitals) were instituted about the begining of the new century, and had the backing of such people as Lyman E. Barnes, Bertin Ramsay, H. G. Freeman, Charles W. Mory, J. E. Thomas, F. D. Lake, S. Clinedinst, C. S. Dickinson, E. P. Humphrey, M. F. Mitchell, Thomas Orbison, A. S. Galpin, George C. Sherman, E. G. Jones, Miss Morgan, Mrs. F. C. Shattuck, Mrs. Hall, Mrs. Oborn, the Pattens, Stansburys, Van Nortwicks, Kimberlys, Smiths, Ullmans and others. Later Mr. Wertheimer became interested, also Mr. Erb, Mr. Conway, Mr. Utz, Mr. Gilbert and Mr. McNaughton, followed by Mr. Rosebush; and still later the younger generation, including George and Charles Baldwin, the Wettengels, Dr. H. Schaper, Albert Gilbert, Dr. Brooks, Dr. Moore, Frank Young, William Hoyt, Mr. Walker, Miss Hartung, Miss Harriet Smith, Miss Buchanan, Miss Thom, Miss Ryan, Miss Reid and others, and it would seem as if after all these years of continued success the concerts were now permanently established. This was the pioneer course and has been copied by others in this vicinity, although differing from many in that its object has been to raise the standard of music with no thought of pecuniary profits. In the public schools Mr. Zenier worked for many years, turning out some excellent singers, readers and teachers. His pupils were also taught harmony, history, theory and analysis, and with him contributed many volumes to the public library on these subjects. In his piano work he has perhaps been most successful, and many a well known celebrity can thank him for a splendid technical foundation.

His teaching has had the endorsement of the best pianists and critics in the country. In 1892, with the co-operation of Miss Ida Graham, Clarence Shepard and A. M. Maeder, all local teachers, Mr. Zenier organized a series of quarterly Historical Recitals, at first as an experiment to interest the pupils in obtaining a broader knowledge of the classics than could be crowded into a lesson of an half hour's duration. The interest and enthusiasm in these concerts has steadily increased, and as they are now in their nineteenth year, a liberal education has been handed out free of charge to the pupils and their friends. Many works of the old masters have been studied and illustrated, including compositions for clavichord, piano, violin, organ and cello, also chamber music, opera, cantata, oratorio, symphony ensemble music, a cappella, and the folk songs of various nations. In scanning the programs of these concerts, all of which have been preserved, one finds the names of Theda Clark, Blanche Ullman, Martha and Mary Van Nortwick, Edith and Edna Beveridge, Clara Hartung, Winifred Willson, Nellie West, Laura Erb, Alice Barnes, Hallie and Ethel Ramsay, Emma Patten, Georgia Hall, Ann Thomas, Madge Hoyt, Dora Heyman, Florence Brown, Lucy Ingold, Gertrude Creedon, Edward, John and Fred Schlosser, Herbert and William Harwood, Dr. C. E. Schmidt, Carl Schneider, George H. Schmidt, Edward Hilfert, Richard Thickeus, Louis Kirchner, John Graber, Alvin Hauert, Wm. Houston, Morris Wilson, Arthur Shattuck, Lyman E. Barnes, Mr. and Mrs. Ledyard Smith, Mrs. Ramsay, Mrs. Wertheimer, Mrs. Oborn, Mrs. Voecks, Mrs. Clinedinst, and many others---some whose names are now hardly more than a memory.

In 1909 the Philharmonic Society was organized with a membership of a little less than 100 and included the principal vocalists of the city, many of whom had sung under Mr. Zenier's direction for years. It was the first choral society to take out a charter, and among its officers were George H. Schmidt, its first president; Dr. C. E. Schmidt, vice-president; William W. Houston, secretary; and on the committees, Miss Perry, F. F. Wettengel, John Buchanan, Miss Willson, Dr. Brooks, Carl Schneider, Fred V. Heinemann, Dr. and Mrs. Dohearty, Mrs. Victor Marshall, Mrs. George H. Peerenboom, Mrs. Adsit, Louis Kirchner, etc. Mr. Zenier was re-elected director in 1910. The Society has many fine entertainments to its credit, such as the Forty-second Psalm of Mendelssohn, which was given with Miss Vina Shattuck as soloist, Dubois' Seven Last Words (two performances), with Miss Willson, William Harwood and William W. Houston as soloists, Rossini's Stabat Mater (three performances), Miss Willson, Mrs. Oborn, Mr. Graber and Dr. Schmidt in the solo parts; The Holy City with Fred V. Heinemann, the operas of the Chimes of Normandy and Pinafore (each two performances) with large orchestra and stage accessories, and in which operas the young people were given an opportunity to display their talents, vocal and histrionic, and in many instances the right to lay claim to being professionals. The Society has never been led into the error of attempting a work it could not do creditably and it is the hope of Mr. Zenier and of many members of the Society that the time is not far distant when the Philharmonics will have a home and hall of their own, equipped with pipe organ, grand piano, library, etc. The Society is not affiliated with any church or school, and welcomes all singers who have good voices and a knowledge of music. Mr. Zenier's preparation as an organist was most thorough, for besides the teachers already named, he was also a pupil of Widor and Libert in Paris, and did considerable work in composition with Albert Lavignac. He is also a program-maker of no mean ability; in fact there are few musicians who approach him in versatility. Those who know and understand him best are his pupils, for they are his friends and his associates. Many of them are a great credit to his teaching, and when it comes time for him to lay down his work he will be consoled by the thought that his labors have not been in vain. His studio is one of the most attractive in the United States, and has been the wonder and delight of many visiting artists. Maud Powell in sending him an autographed photograph, inscribed on it: "To Mr. Alex. Zenier, Art Connaisseur and Humorist, Musician and Bon Camarade."

CHRIST HANSLETT, who may be named as one of the representative farmers of Seymour township, is engaged in general farming and stock raising operations on a valuable tract of fifty acres, situated on section 3. His birth occurred July 24, 1853, in Germany, and he is a son of George and Mary (Ridaud) Hansleit, natives of the Fatherland who came to the United States in 1873 with their six children, namely: Helena, Minnie, John, Zomwale, Christ and Gusta. Making their way to Wisconsin, the family settled on forty acres of land near Seymour, where the father and sons began to clear the land for cultivation, the family home at that time being a log cabin and the only other building on the farm a log barn. They remained on the original purchase for nine years, and at the end of that time came to the present family home, on section 3, then a forty-acre tract, to which ten acres has since been added, and here George Hansleit spent the remainder of his life. Christ Hansleit worked with his father until the latter's death, when he took charge of the property, and he has made many improvements both to land and buildings, and carries on general farming and raises good livestock. His mother, who is still living, makes her home with him.

Christ Hansleit was married to Reka Barth, who was born in 1876, in Germany, and they have been the parents of six children, as follows: William, Bertha, John, Mary, George and Walter.

ALFRED R. HILLS, a progressive and well-to-do agriculturist of Dale township, Outagamie county, operating a farm of 160 acres situated in section 35, was born in Dale township, August 27, 1869, and is a son of Hubbard E. Hills. Hubbard E. Hills was born April 4, 1834, in East Hartford, Connecticut, and was married in the spring of 1854, to Miss Hannah C. Akins, who was born September 21, 1837. After their marriage they came to Wisconsin and settled on wild land in Dale township, where they spent the remainder of their lives, Mr. Hills dying December 11, 1900. Alfred R. Hills was one of a family of nine children, and he received his education in the common schools, remaining on the home farm until he was twenty years of age, at which time he commenced working for wages at the cheese making trade. He continued thus for twelve years, and during the next three years was engaged in the manufacture of cheese on his own account. In 1896 his factory was destroyed by fire, and he again began working for wages, but in 1905 returned to the home farm, which now belongs to his mother, and here he has carried on general farming ever since, having about 100 acres of land under cultivation. He markets dairy products, hogs, potatoes and some grain, and is considered one of the good, practical farmers of his township. He is socially connected with the Equitable Fraternal Union and Modern Woodmen of America, and is a Republican in his political views, having served Dale township as a member of the school board for about five years. In 1895 Mr. Hills was married to Miss Minnie Alger, who was born October 7, 1875, the second of three daughters born to Hartley and Marilla Alger, natives of New York State who were married there and later moved to Illinois where Mrs. Alger died. Mr. Alger then returned to New York State where his death occurred. One child has been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hills, Murl E., who was born February 5, 1896.

JAMES A. LYONS, M. D., a prominent practicing physician of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who has been identified with the medical profession of Welcome, Wisconsin, for a number of years, was born May 25, 1866, in Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, and is a son of James and Elizabeth (Graney) Lyons, natives of County Kerry, Ireland. James Lyons came to the United States in 1848, and settled in the State of Vermont, where he was married to Elizabeth Graney, who had come to that State in girlhood. A few years later they moved to Ohio, and in 1856 came to Wisconsin and settled in Fond du Lac county, where Mr. Lyons purchased 120 acres of wild, undeveloped land and engaged in farming until 1891, at which time he retired from active life and moved to the town of Eden, where his death occurred November 10, 1906, when he was eighty-four years old, his widow surviving until September 7, 1910, and dying at the age of eighty-three. Both are buried in St. Mathew's Catholic Cemetery in Osceola township, Fond du Lac county. They were the parents of eight children: Mary, who married James Robinson, of Chokio, Minnesota; John, who died at the age of twenty-eight years; Edward H., engaged in the manufacturing business in Fond du Lac, and present representative of his district in the State Legislature, married Mary Cavanaugh; Hannah, who married Thomas Cahill, of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin; Thomas E., a lawyer of Madison, and a graduate of the State University, was recently appointed by the Governor to the chairmanship of the State Tax Commission; Elizabeth, who married William McMahon, of Eden, Wisconsin; James A.; and Anna, deceased. James A. Lyons first attended the common schools, and then took a course in the Oshkosh Normal, passing the examinations and becoming a teacher at the age of seventeen years. During the following six winters he taught school and in the summers worked on his father's farm, then becoming traveling salesman, which occupation he followed for three years. In 1891 he entered Rush Medical College, having decided upon a medical career, and in 1894 was graduated with the degree of M. D., later taking a post-graduate course in the Chicago Polyclinic Institute. Immediately thereafter he commenced practice in Welcome, and hee had built up a large and lucrative practice when he was the victim of an unfortunate accident, being kicked in the abdomen by a horse, causing injuries that made him an invalid for three or four years and necessitated four surgical operations. The continued strain caused nervous prostration, and he eventually sold his practice to Dr. Perry Commerford of Appleton, now deceased. By 1906 Dr. Lyons had so far recovered that he resumed his practice and returned to Welcome where he has been located ever since.

In October, 1897, Dr. Lyons was married to Miss Nellie Sullivan, born February 24, 1869, daughter of Jeremiah and Mary (Harrington) Sullivan, of Lebanon, Waupaca county, and they have had five children: Mary E., deceased; Owen E., Alice E., Lawrence J. and Austin J., deceased. Dr. Lyons is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, the Equitable Fraternal Union, the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Royal Neighbors. He is a Republican in politics. With his family he attends St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church at Welcome.

WENSEL A. SCHREITER, postmaster of Greenville Station, Wisconsin, and one of the leading business men of this community, has been interested with the growth and development of this part of Outagamie county for a number of years. He was born in Ellington township, Outagamie county, April 18, 1868, a son of Anton and Anna (Michlin) Schreiter, natives of Oesterich, Bohemia, where the father was born April 4, 1836. Mrs. Schreiter died when Wensel was a mere child. Anton Schreiter came to the United States in 1854, settling in Ellington township, where he worked for other people until accumulating enough money to purchase a farm of forty acres. After his return from the Civil War, in which he served nine months as a member of a Wisconsin Volunteer regiment, he returned to his property which he operated until his retirement from active life, when he moved to Appleton, but after a residence there of several years he returned to the old homestead and died there October 19, 1908. Wensel A. Schreiter was the only child born to his parents who grew to maturity, and his education was secured in the district schools of Ellington township. At the age of twenty-one years he began farming on his own account, renting land in Ellington township for a time and later buying the same property, on which he was engaged in operations until 1903. In that year he sold out and went to Greenville Station, engaging in the farm implement business, and later in the hotel business. Still later he became also a dealer in coal, lumber, lime, cement and general merchandise, and he is now erecting a new store room 24x46 feet for the general merchandise department. He is also a heavy stockholder in the new Appleton Bank and in the Appleton Fair Association. For some years Mr. Schreiter has been prominent in local politics, serving as justice of the peace two terms, and is now treasurer of the school board and postmaster of the village, having held the latter position continuously since 1906. His success has been the result of honesty and industry, and he has won the esteem of all who know him by his upright dealings with his fellow men. His religious connection is with the Roman Catholic Church. On January 7, 1890, Mr. Schreiter was married to Margaret Schmit, who was born in Ellington township, June 24, 1868, daughter of Nicholas A. and Katharine (Nussbaum) Schmit, the former born in Liesenberg, Germany, June 25, 1830, and the latter in Rhine Province, April 9, 1825. Mr. Schmit was a lad of sixteen years when he came to the United States, and he first found employment in Chicago, from which city he made his way to Outagamie county. Here, after some work as a farm hand, he became a land owner in Ellington township, adding to his first small purchase from time to time until he had 200 acres of fine land, and some years before his death, which occurred in January, 1901, he retired from activities. He and Mrs. Schmit had four children, namely: Katharine, the wife of Henry Boehler, residing near Hortonville, retired; Josephine, the wife of Joseph Hoier, a farmer of Greenville township; Margaret, Mrs. Schreiter; and Joseph, who is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Schreiter have had six children: Hubert, born December 1, 1890, who died June 14, 1901; Celia, born January 28, 1892, the wife of Harry H. Schulze, a merchant of Greenville; Hattie, born March 20, 1893, single, and residing at home; Roman, born May 12, 1895, who died June 12, 1901; and Leo, born October 30, 1896; and Eveline, born January 2, 1903, living at home with their parents.

CHARLES HAAS, who has been a lifelong resident of Greenville township, Outagamie county, was born on the farm which he at present operates, situate on Dale Rural Route No. 17, September 19, 1873, and is a son of Andrew and Katharine (Marks) Haas. Andrew Haas was born in Baden, Germany, April 30, 1834, and came to this country in 1853, while his wife, who was born December 9, 1839, in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, followed him to this country in 1855, and they were married in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, in 1858. Before coming to Outagamie county, Andrew Haas worked on a farm in New York State for a time, later going to St. Louis, Missouri, where he was engaged in driving a team. For some years he rented a farm in Outagamie county, and then purchased the homestead in Greenville township, which was then covered with heavy timber. Having no horses, Mr. Haas used oxen for his work, and he often drove his ox-team to Neenah to do his trading, that being the nearest and most convenient trading point at that time. A small log cabin was the original family home, but this soon gave way to a handsome brick house, and the fine appointments of the farm as it stands today do not resemble in many respects the bleak, discouraging appearance of the virgin land of not so many years ago. Hard and persevering work brought around marvelous changes and the Haas farm now compares favorably with any of its size in the township. Andrew Haas operated this land from 1858 until 1899, in which latter year the active management was taken up by his son, Charles, who was educated in this township and has never left the home farm. On February 17, 1865, Andrew Haas enlisted in Company A, Fiftieth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and he continued in the service as a private until his honorable discharge, June 12, 1866. Since that time he has been living on this farm, although since 1899 he has not engaged in active labor. He and Mrs. Haas have had five children: Theodore and Henry, who are deceased; Minna, who is the wife of Fred Abraham, a Dale township farmer; Lottie, the wife of Harry Keets, a resident of Appleton; and Charles.

Charles Haas is a Republican in politics and a member of the Evangelical Church. He was married March 24, 1899, to Theresa Abraham, who was born in Black Wolf township, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, November 16, 1879, daughter of John and Amelia (Haberberg) Abraham, natives of Germany who came to the United States about 1871 and located in Black Wolf township. Mrs. Abraham now resides in Dale township, where her husband died in 1898, the family having moved into Outagamie county about 1891. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Haas: Edna, November 15, 1900; Harold, March 9, 1909; and Ralph, February 28, 1911.

FRANK DEIMER, for more than sixteen years an esteemed resident of Greenville township, Outagamie county, where he ranks among the prosperous self-made agriculturists, is a native of Appleton, Wisconsin, born May 17, 1874, a son of Joseph and Anna (Becker) Deimer, natives of Bohemia, Austria-Hungary. Joseph Deimer learned the trade of carpenter early in life, and came to the United States as a young man. It is believed that he spent some time in Milwaukee, and then removed to Seymour, eventually going to Appleton where he met his death in a mill accident. Frank Deimer does not remember ever having seen his father. His mother later married Conrad Kreitzberg and now resides in Appleton. There were four children born to Joseph and Anna Deimer, namely: Mary, who married George Schmidt, a resident of Greenville township; Anna, the wife of Joseph Moder, of Dale township; Frank; and Josephine, who married Sebastian Griesbach. Mr. and Mrs. Kreitzberg had two children: Henry, a farmer of Ellington township; and Theodore, who is deceased. Frank Deimer received a somewhat limited education in the district schools of Ellington township, and early in life began to work as a farm hand. He was economical and thrifty, and when only twenty-one years old had accumulated enough means to invest in a forty-acre farm in Greenville township, on which he operated for ten years. At the end of this time he purchased his present farm, an excellent tract of 120 acres, and here he carries on general and dairy farming, and raises some live stock for his own use. Mr. Deimer has been a hard worker from boyhood, and from a start of nothing has accumulated a comfortable property. He has never speculated, and his success shows what it is possible for a man to accomplish by honesty and perseverance and a determination to win. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a consistent member of the Roman Catholic Church. On May 18, 1897, Mr. Deimer was married to Theresa Bauer, born in Grand Chute township, February 24, 1873, the estimable daughter of Andrew Bauer. Mr. and Mrs. Deimer have had eight children, born as follows: Mary, January 15, 1898; Conrad, August 6, 1899; Joseph, March 29, 1901; Georgie, December 29, 1902; Eleanora, March 29, 1904, died May 14, 1905; Rosie, born April 22, 1906; Hildegard, January 29, 1908; and Isabella, March 10, 1911. Mr. Deimer holds membership in the Catholic Knights, in which he is very popular.

JOSEPH GRIESBACH, who is a well-known representative of one of Outagamie county's old and honored pioneer families, is engaged in cultivating a farm in Center township. His grandfather, Frederick Griesbach, was born in Prussia and came to the United States in 1856 with his wife, Margaret, and four children, and after landing at New York the family made their way to Chicago, where the father's means became exhausted. He was compelled to go on without the rest of the family, but on reaching Waukesha, Wisconsin, he sent his son-in-law, Conrad Baler, who had married one of Griesbach's daughters some time before coming to this county, back to the Windy City to bring the little family on. With this same son-in-law, Mr. Griesbach rented a farm, which they operated together for two years, and Mr. Griesbach then purchased eighty acres of school land in Center township, Outagamie county, hiring a team of oxen and a wagon with which to move his family into the woods. On the way from Neenah, the drivers of the ox team lost their way, the ground being covered with a foot of snow, and refused to go further, and the family eventually took possession of a log schoolhouse east of Appleton, into which the household goods were moved while the men started out to find the new land they had bought. It was finally found fourteen miles northwest of the camping place, by this time the snow having fallen so fast that there were four feet on the ground. Although they had known something of farming in the old country, these German lads knew little of conditions here, and Frederick Griesbach, who was a mason, could not see how a house was to be built without the use of nails, but was soon instructed as to that by the McGillan boy, a resident of the neighborhood, who showed Mr. Griesbach how to cut the logs to build his cabin. When the house was built, the family was brought to it, and all hands started in to clear a farm from the wilderness. That this was accomplished is found to be so when Frederick Griesbach's career is perused, as he died a prosperous and highly respected farmer.

Sebastian Griesbach, father of Joseph, was born May 3, 1846, in Germany, and his schooling was started in the old country, he being eight years of age when the family left for the United States . He attended school in Center township, and at the age of ten years began to work by the day, helping to clear land at three dollars per month and board. During the second summer he received five dollars a month, the third summer made him the possessor of a cow, and during his fourth and final summer with this farmer he was given a pair of young, unbroken steers. When he had reached the age of fifteen years, Mr. Griesbach went to work by the month at ten dollars, and at the end of the season had saved fifty dollars, which he invested in sixty-eight acres of land, the price for this unimproved property being $350. Each morning he would walk from his father's home, a distance of three miles, work hard all day, clearing his land, and returning home at night utterly exhausted would assist in whatever duties presented themselves at his father's place. He built a log cabin, and when he was but nineteen years old was married to Frances Bauer, daughter of Michael Bauer. He had made all the furniture for this little home out of bass-wood logs, including bedstead, tables and chairs, and here he brought his young wife. He cleared all of this property, residing on the farm for eighteen years, and then sold out and purchased a property in Freedom township, but inside of seven months sold that place and bought another Center township property, only to trade this after three years for a farm near Twelve Corners. Here he resided for twenty-eight years. Mr. Griesbach is not in good health physically, being troubled by rheumatism, but he is exceptionally bright mentally and is one of the best informed men of his locality. His wife, who like Mr. Griesbach was a member of St. Edward's Catholic Church, died in 1904, having been the mother of eleven children, as follows: Anna; Theresa; Barbara; Frederick, who died when eight years old; Casper, who died aged fifteen years; Frank, who was seven years old at the time of his death; Katherine, who passed away aged twenty years; and Joseph, Nicholas, Agnes and John.

Joseph Griesbach was born March 6, 1876, in Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and he received his education in the district schools of the neighborhood of his father's farm, on which he worked until he was twenty-five years old, at which time his father presented him with the farm he now operates as a reward for the years of faithful work he performed on the old home place. He has made various improvements on the tract, having a good set of buildings, neat fences, good water and fine pasture land, and raises good crops and feeds fine cattle. In 1901 he was married to Mary Striegel, daughter of Martin Striegel, a prominent agriculturist of Center township, and to this union there have been born seven children, namely: Hilda, who died at the age of two years, four months; Francis, who was born in 1902; Josephine in 1903; Arnold, in 1906; Oscar in 1908; George, in 1909; and Delia, in 1910. Both Mr. and Mrs. Griesbach are members of St. Edward's Catholic Church, at Mackville.

WILLIAM G. BAEHNMAN, one of the enterprising and progressive young agriculturists of Greenville township, Outagamie county, who is farming an excellent tract of ninety acres, was born June 14, 1885, in Waushara county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Gottfried and Augusta (Maldewin) Baehnman, natives of Germany, where the father was born in November, 1857, and the mother in August, 1866. Gottfried Baehnman came to the United States when a boy, in 1866, with his parents, who located first in Milwaukee and later removed to West Bloomfield. Reared to the life of an agriculturist, Mr. Baehnman has always followed farming as an occupation, and now owns a fine property near West Bloomfield. He has served as chairman of the township board, and is president of the Farmers' Insurance Company, and is widely known and highly respected in his section. He and his wife had a family of ten children, William G. being the fourth in order of birth. He attended school in West Bloomfield, studying both German and English, and when he was seventeen years of age began working out among the farmers of his neighborhood, although he lived at home. Mr. Baehnman was married in 1910, and in the following year, January 2, 1911, he purchased his present ninety-acre tract, where he has since carried on general farming. He gives all of his attention to his property, and so has not found time to join any fraternal associations nor to engage actively in politics, although he is a stanch Republican. His religious connection is with the German Lutheran Church. Mr. Baehnman was married November 10, 1910, to Miss Elizabeth Wilke, who was born at West Bloomfield, January 18, 1886, daughter of Charles and Anna, (Hayer) Wilke, natives of Germany who now reside at Bloomfield, where Mr. Wilke owns an excellent farm. Mrs. Baehnman's parents had a family of seven children, and she was the second in order of birth.

JOHN BUSCH, a thrifty and industrious agriculturist of section 28, Buchanan township, has spent his life in farming in this locality, having been born in this township, May 8, 1869, a son of John and Gertrude Busch, natives of Holland. Mr. Busch's parents were married in Outagamie county, and settled in Buchanan township; where they resided until Mr. Busch's death in September, 1886, when fifty-three years of age, since which time his widow has made her home with her son, John, and is now seventy-nine years old. John Busch was the eldest of his parents' five children, of whom two are now living, and he remained at home until his marriage, June 30, 1891, to Miss Catherine Janson. She was born February 9, 1871, the third of the six children born to Matthew and Anna (Harjes) Janson, who came from Holland to America about 1866 and settled in what is now known as Vandenbroek township, Outagamie county, where Mr. Janson died in 1887, aged fifty-two years, and his widow is now living on the homestead at the age of eighty years. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Busch, as follows: Gertrude, Matthew, Anna, Henry, Agnes, Helen, John and George. After his marriage, Mr. Busch rented his father's farm until 1897, in which year he acquired the title by purchase. He has fifty acres under cultivation, all fenced with barbed wire, and has twenty-eight acres in timber, and does general farming, and dairying, in addition to harvesting and selling ice. He milks twelve cows of mixed breeds and raises fine Percheron horses. He remodeled his house in 1902, and his barn is now 36x82feet with the remodeling he placed on it in 1908. His farm shows the beneficial effects of good management and a knowledge of the soil and climatic conditions. In political matters Mr. Busch is a Democrat, and he and his family are consistent members of the Catholic Church at Kimberly.

LOUIS GEORGE BLEICK, one of the most energetic and progressive business men and farmers of Greenville township, Outagamie county, whose excellent farm of 180 acres is one of the best properties in this part of the county, was born on this farm, January 19, 1884, and is a son of Louis and Josephine (Schroth) Bleick, the former born on this farm, November 19, 1859, a son of Louis Bleick, a native of Germany who secured this property from the United States government and resided here until his death in 1898. His wife survived him until 1902. Louis Bleick, the father of Louis G., remained on this farm until his retirement in April, 1911, when he went to Appleton to reside. He is one of the very well known farmers of Greenville township, where he has served as township treasurer and in other offices. He married Josephine Schroth, who was born at Stephensville, Wisconsin, May 2, 1861, and they have had two sons: Elmer H., who resides with his parents in Appleton engaged in the automobile business; and Louis George. The latter received a district school education in Greenville township, after which he took two terms at Lawrence University, Appleton. From 1903 until 1909 he was engaged in the music business, also conducting a brass band and orchestra, and during the summer of 1910 engaged in the automobile business with his brother. Finding, however, that farming agreed better with his health, when his father retired from active life in 1911, he took over the management of the home farm of 180 acres, which he has conducted to the present time. He uses an automobile, finding it very useful in going about the farm and in his frequent visits to adjoining cities, and he does not hesitate in advocating its use to his farmer friends. He is very progressive in his ideas, and nothing but the most up-to-date machinery, utensils and accessories are used on his farm. Like the other members of this family, Mr. Bleick is a faithful member of the Lutheran Church. He is independent in political matters, and has not as yet found time to engage actively in affairs of a public nature. Mr. Bleick is unmarried.

JOHN THEODORE WELTZIEN, a prosperous and enterprising young agriculturist of Outagamie county, residing on a fine farm in Greenville township, was born on his present property, August 31, 1880, and is a son of John and Hannah (Schuchnecht) Weltzien, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany, where the former was born in 1843, and the latter March 10, 1848. John Weltzieil came to this country with his parents when about fifteen years of age, the family settling on a farm about two miles south of the present farm of John T. Weltzien which was purchased by them two years later. Here John Weltzien grew to manhood and succeeded to the ownership of the property, on which he died in 1894. His widow later moved to Appleton, where her death occurred in 1908. They were the parents of nine children, as follows: Minnie, the wife of Edward Gable, editor of the Herald, of Antigo, Wisconsin; Frederick, a farmer of Greenville township; Etta, deceased, who was the wife of John Reich, a carpenter of Greenville township; Louisa, the wife of Henry Hameister, a farmer of Norwood township, residing at Antigo; Alvena and Lena, who are deceased; John Theodore; Henry, a resident of Appleton; and Hilda, a trained nurse of Chicago. John Theodore Weltzien attended school in Greenville township and the Third Ward, Appleton, and he has never left the home farm. On attaining his majority he began working for his mother until he was married, then rented the homestead for five years, at the end of which time he bought the property, and he now operates the 100 acres as a general farm and gives some time to stock raising. In politics Mr. Weltzien is independent, and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church. He was married February 11, 1903, to Hattie Schoettler, who was born one and one-half miles south of her present home, February 11, 1882, daughter of Carl and Louisa (Wolf) Schoettler, the former born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, December 1, 1836, and the latter in Hamburg-Schwerin, April 25, 1849. They were married in Greenville township, Mrs. Schoettler having come to the United States when fifteen years of age with her parents, while her husband came to this country alone when twenty-one years old. He went to work for his brother, John, who was a blacksmith in Greenville township, but after two years purchased a farm of seventy acres in Greenville township, and here spent the balance of his life, dying June 9, 1910, while his wife passed away October 25, 1903. They were the parents of eight children: John, residing one and one-half miles southwest of Weltzien; Bertha, who is deceased; Alvena, the wife of Harry Learned, a finisher in the Appleton Wire Works; Charles and Louis, deceased; Ida, the wife of Albert Maas, residing one and one-half miles southeast of Mr. Weltzien; Hattie; and Otto, who resides on the old homestead. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Weltzien: Myron John Frederick, born January 15, 1905, who died at the age of five weeks; and Gladys Johannah Henrietta, born February 7, 1907.

THOMAS H. RYAN, Judge of the Municipal Court at Appleton, was born in the town of Buchanan, this county, January 21, 1867. Daniel and Winnifred (Powers) Ryan, his parents, were natives of Ireland, born in County Limerick and County Clare, respectively, and both came to the United States about the year 1848 and were married in Massachusetts two years later. After seven years they came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and bought unimproved Government land in the town of Buchanan. To the original purchase of eighty acres Mr. Ryan added at different times until he had acquired 300 acres. He died February 24, 1907, preceded by his wife on October 16, 1903. They were the parents of four sons and four daughters and reared their children in the same faith to which they belonged---the Roman Catholic religion. Their children were: Ellen, the wife of Peter Cripps, of Kaukauna; Mary, deceased; Daniel J., residing on the old homestead and chairman of the board of supervisors; Malachi, a resident of Buchanan; Anna, who married James Harney and has her home in Duluth; Thomas H.; Winnifred, whose home is with her brother, Malachi; and Dr. M. C. Ryan, of Oklahoma. Mr. Ryan was a man of pronounced characteristics, possessed of a level business head, strictly temperate in his habits, an abstainer from the use of tobacco, a consistent member of the Catholic Church and of Sunday observance, never aspired for official position, kindly as a father and neighbor and a man of unblemished reputation. Thomas H. Ryan was educated at the Ryan high school, Appleton, and was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts from the University of Wisconsin in 1891. He took the law course in the State University from which he was graduated June 16, 1892, and succeeding which he began practicing his profession at Appleton, first in partnership with A. B. Whitman and later alone. He was city attorney from 1897 to 1907, and was then elected Judge of the Municipal Court in which official position he has since served. The principal recreation of Judge Ryan is in looking after his farm and engaging in literary pursuits. He is a Catholic in religion, a Democrat in politics and socially is identified with the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters. October 27, 1897, he married Elizabeth Cuthbert, and to this union three daughters and two sons have been born.

ALFRED HILLER, one of the experienced agriculturists and sterling citizens of Greenville township, who is now operating eighty acres of finely improved land, has spent all of his life on this farm, and was born here, April 27, 1878, a son of William and Elisa (Jenkel) Hiller. Mr. Hiller's parents were natives of Mecklenburg, Germany, where his father was born August 1, 1839, and his mother April 22, 1842. William Hiller came to the United States in 1867, and settled at once in the town of Greenville, where he began to work at the carpenter's trade, an occupation which he had followed in the Fatherland. Shortly thereafter he went to Iowa, but after one year came back to Greenville and purchased the land now owned by his son Alfred, on which he carried on agricultural pursuits until his death, December 10, 1900. His widow, who still survives, makes her home with Alfred on the old homestead. Four children were born to William and Elisa Hiller, namely: Alfred; Dora, residing at home with her mother and brother; Henrietta, the wife of Julius Schneider, of Greenville; and one child who died in infancy. Alfred Hiller attended school in the town of Greenville and two terms in Appleton, and was reared to the life of an agriculturist. He has never left the old family homestead, and since his father's death has been operating the eighty acres in a general way. He farms along practical lines and is largely interested in dairying. In addition to his farming interests, Mr. Hiller holds stock in the Fox River Valley Gas and Oil Company and the U. S. Meridian Oil Company, and is one of the stockholders of a sugar plantation at Tamasopa, Mexico. He is a Democrat in politics, and with his mother and sister is a consistent member of the German Lutheran Church in Greenville.

PERRY HENRY BERTSCHY, deceased, who from 1868 until 1883 was engaged in a wholesale grocery business in Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in Illinois, December 28, 1844, and was a son of Leonard and Catherine Bertschy, natives of Switzerland who came to the United States and located in Illinois at an early day. Perry H. Bertschy obtained his education in the Baltimore (Maryland) College, and about 1865 he came to Appleton and established a wholesale grocery business, which was conducted by him with great success until 1874, when he sold his wholesale business and established a retail dry goods store. This he conducted until 1879, when he sold the store and went to New York city and engaged in business for two years. He then went to Saguache, Colorado, and there became a prominent figure in the industrial world, being identified with various large business ventures, including financial institutions, mines, ranches. and mercantile houses, and there he died October 31, 1894. Mr. Bertschy was married April 28, 1875, to Miss Minnie Donkersley, born in Paterson, New Jersey. Her parents, Cornelius and Mary A. Donkersley, came to Appleton in 1873. Mr. Donkersley, who was one of the leading men of his time, and an inventor of rare attainments, built the railroad from Marquette to the upper peninsula, a distance of sixty miles, and operated the first locomotive that ran over it. His trade was that of locomotive builder, and he was also largely interested in blast furnaces throughout this region; he died in Appleton August 5, 1894. His widow passed away in Colorado. Mr. and Mrs. Bertschy had two sons: Raymond D., who is traveling for the Fox River Paper Company, is a widower and has two children, Raymond P. and Jane P.; and Perry H., a graduate of the Golden School of Mines, Colorado, and now a mining engineer in South Dakota. Mr. Bertschy was a Mason, and both of his sons belong to that order. His widow is a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church.

WILLIAM F. EBERT, one of the old and honored residents of Grand Chute township, who is the owner of ninety-five acres of valuable farming land, is carrying on general agricultural operations, and also has built up a large wholesale milk business. He was born in Pommern, in Prussia, January 1, 1839, and is a son of Carl and Fredericka (Umland) Ebert, natives of that country, where the father was born in 1807 and the mother four years later. Carl Ebert was a cabinetmaker by trade, and neither he nor his wife ever left their native land. William F. Ebert attended the schools in the place of his nativity, and was only twelve years old when his mother died, and at this time he commenced working for himself, he being engaged at herding sheep until he left for America in 1869. He came at once to Wisconsin, where he became a farm laborer and also was employed at railroad construction work, later becoming an employe of the Adkinson factory, where he continued to work for nine years. Having accumulated a little capital, he rented a small farm in Grand Chute township and went into the milk business, operating a route for twelve years, at the end of which time he purchased his present farm of fifty-five acres and later made another purchase of forty acres near this property. With the help of his sons, he now farms this property along general lines, and he has it equipped as a dairy farm, having built up a large wholesale trade in milk. He gives his entire attention to his farming interests, and expects to make this property his home during the remainder of his life. Mr. Ebert has never cared for public office, and in his political views is not bound by party lines, being independent in voting. He and his family are connected with the Lutheran Church. For many years Mr. Ebert was a member of the Sons of Herman, but he has severed his connections with this order during latter years.

In October, 1872, Mr. Ebert was married to Bertha Greundeman, who was born in Pommern, in Prussia, July 1, 1846, daughter of Julius and Charlotta (Steffen) Greundeman, natives of that country who never came to America. Mr. Greundeman was a carpenter and building contractor. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Ebert, namely: William, who is living at home assisting his father; Lizzie, who married Anton Ullrich, living in Grand Chute township; Minnie, who married Walter Harms, living on a part of Mr. Ebert's farm; Anna, who is living at home; and Carl, who is also single and engaged in operating the home farm.

FRED NORENBERG, whose excellent 160-acre farm in the town of Greenville, Outagamie county, is the just reward for his many years of hard, conscientious labor, is one of the self-made men of this part of the county, and is known as a practical farmer and public-spirited citizen. He was born near Osseken, Pomerania, Germany, December 19, 1859, a son of Christian and Fredrika Norenberg, also a native of that country, where he spent the remainder of his life, being engaged in laboring. Frederick Norenberg attended school in his native city, from the age of six to fourteen years then began learning the trade of shoemaker, working as an apprentice for four years and as a journeyman for six years. On coming to America, July 10, 1884, he was first in Chicago for about ten days and then went to Marion, Wisconsin, where he worked at farming for his uncle a short time. In the spring he went into the woods and commenced burning charcoal at sixty-five cents per cord, but after a short period entered a shoe establishment in Shawano. From that point he went to Antigo, and later came to Outagamie county, where he worked at New London and Appleton for about five years. At the time of his marriage he rented his present farm, but after about two years he bought the property, and he now has 160 acres, fully equipped with substantial buildings, including one of the most modern residences in the town, which was erected by Mr. Norenberg at a cost of more than $3,000. On March 17, 1890, Mr. Norenberg was married to Marie Lansert, who was born September 10, 1867. Mr. and Mrs. Norenberg have had four children, namely: Louisa, born September 5, 1891; Alvina, born July 14, 1892; Mata, born January 21, 1894; and Anna, born April 15, 1896, who met an accidental death at the age of five years. Mr. and Mrs. Norenberg have also an adopted son, John, whom they are rearing with their children. The family is connected with the Lutheran Church. In politics Mr. Norenberg is a Republican, but he has never aspired to office.

FRANK FALCK, vice-president of the Seymour State Bank and for a number of years prominently identified with the business interests of Seymour, Wisconsin, is now living retired from business activities. Mr. Falck's birth occurred near Milwaukee, in what is now Washington county, Wisconsin, November 10, 1852, and he is a son of Phillip and Catherine (Hanger) Falck, natives of Darmstadt, River Rhine, Germany. Phillip Falck came to the United States when he was thirteen years of age with his parents, and the family settled at Albany, New York, where they resided for twenty-seven years, coming thence to Morrison, Brown county, Wisconsin. Phillip Falck's first work was on the streets of Albany, and he started for Milwaukee on foot, peddling on the way. He later located a homestead in Washington county, but eventually removed to Morrison, Brown county, where he purchased a farm and also conducted a general store, with which he was identified until 1876 and in this year turned the business over to his sons Phillip and Frank and retired from active life. His death occurred in 1889 at Morrison, when he was seventy-one years of age, his wife being the same age when she died ten years later. Their children were as follows: Jacob, Phillip, Frank, George, Peter, Marx, Catherine, John, Daniel and Louis, all of whom are living. Frank Falck received his early education in Brown county, where the family had located when he was but three years old, and after succeeding to his father's business carried that on with his brother Phillip at Morrison until 1890, when he sold his interests and moved to Seymour. Here he formed a partnership with his brother George, and they purchased a stock farm of sixty acres, located one mile south of the city. Two and one-half years later they disposed of this property, and Frank Falck embarked in the general merchandise business in the Odd Fellows building, in Seymour, where he built up a large and lucrative trade and won a wide circle of friends. In 1909, Mr. Falck turned this business over to his son Arthur M. Falck and Henry Wolk, who have since conducted the enterprise under the firm name of Falck & Wolk, and retired from business activities, although he still holds interest in several large business organizations and is vice-president of the Seymour State Bank. On November 10, 1879, Mr. Falck was married at Morrison, Wisconsin, to Caroline Gross, who was born at Morrison, December 3, 1855, daughter of John G. and Margaret (Marshall) Gross, natives of Germany. John G. Gross was born at Reichenhall, Bavaria, in 1828, and died January 17, 1909. He was a son of John G., Sr., and Christina Gross, whose other children were Sophia, Susan and Fred, and who all came to the United States. After the death of his wife, John G. Gross, Sr., joined his son, John G., Jr., who had come to the United States two years previous to this time and located in New York. He followed farming for two years and then came to Washington county, Wisconsin, and several years later removed to Morrison, Brown county, where he was engaged in farming and lumbering and also in conducting a sawmill. Mrs. Margaret (Marshall) Gross died March 6, 1897, aged sixty-six years. Their children were: August, Caroline, John, Louisa, Fred, Maggie, Sophia, Stena and Godfrey, and all are living. Mr. and Mrs. Falck have been the parents of two children: Louisa, born December 4, 1880, was married in August, 1908, to Henry Wolk, and they have one son, Frank A., born January 2, 1911; and Arthur M., born April 3, 1883, was married in 1910 to Lena Otto.

OTTO E. SCHUSTER, owner and proprietor of Elder Lawn Farm, one of the finest farming properties in Seymour township, located on section 26, was born February 5, 1858, in Washington county, Wisconsin, a son of Ernest and Margaret (Lutz) Schuster, and a grandson of Gottlieb Schuster, one of the first settlers of Washington county. Ernest Schuster was born in Germany and was twelve years of age when he accompanied his parents to the United States, and he was reared in Washington county, Wisconsin, where he was married to Margaret Lutz, who was ten years of age when brought to this country. Her father died on the ocean while coming to America, and her mother was married a second time to Gottlieb Miller, also an early settler of Washington county. Ernest and Margaret Schuster had the following children: Otto E., Hattie and Anna, deceased; Sarah, Esther, Amelia, Charles, William; Albert, deceased; and Mary. Otto E. Schuster was about nine years of age when the family located in Osborn township, Outagamie county, on an eighty-acre tract which was situated near the northwest corner on the town line separating Osborn from Seymour township. Here Ernest Schuster built a log cabin and log stable, and on this property the family made their home for about fifteen years, most of the remainder of Mr. Schuster's years being spent in the city of Seymour, where he died in 1907, at the age of seventy-two years. The mother passed away in 1883, when forty-three years of age. Otto E. Schuster secured his education in the schools of Washington and Outagamie counties, and from the age of thirteen years until he was twenty worked in the stave factory at Seymour. Later he was engaged at farm work until 1899, when he located on his present property, which at that time was an uncultivated tract, covered with wild brush. He built a log cabin and stable, the former of which has been remodeled into a handsome frame dwelling, while the latter is still standing, although a fine new barn has been built. Mr. Schuster's property produces large crops, and he has also given a great deal of attention to raising graded cattle, horses and hogs. His political principles are those of the Republican party, but he has never aspired to public office, although he has served as treasurer of school district No. 17, and as road commissioner for ten years. Mr. Schuster joined the Independent Order of Odd Fellows nineteen years ago and is still an active worker and has been through all the chairs and has been a delegate to the Grand Lodge.

On November 17, 1882, Mr. Schuster was married to Louisa Geidel, who was born June 21, 1861, in Washington county, Wisconsin, daughter of John and Ernestina (Geidel) Geidel, natives of Germany. John Geidel came to this country with his father, Andrew, when he was four years old, and his wife, Ernestina, was twenty-four years of age when she came to this country. The Geidel family located in Milwaukee at the time when that city was not much more than a vast swamp, and later moved on to Fillmore, Washington county, where they located on a farm. In 1882 they removed to Dakota, where Mr. Geidel is now residing at the age of eighty-one years, Mrs. Geidel having passed away many years ago at the age of fifty-one. Their children were: Marie, Oswald and Henry, deceased; Louisa, who married Mr. Schuster; Emma and John; and Selma, who is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Schuster have been the parents of four children: Margaret, born. June 11, 1884, who married Leonard McMonagle, is the mother of two children, Gertrude, born in 1908, and Florence, born in 1911, and resides in Green Bay, Wisconsin, where both her children were born; Marie, born August 28, 1886; Selma, born in October, 1888, died at the age of six months; and Ernest, born September 8, 1900.

WILLIAM RUBBERT, whose fine farm of ninety-five acres, located in the town of Greenville, is devoted to general farming and dairying, is a native of the Fatherland, having been born in Prussia, September 20, 1852, his parents, August and Henrietta (Keopke) Rubbert, also being natives of Germany. They came to the United States in 1866, locating in Greenville town, this county, and after renting land for two years bought the present farm of William Rubbert, on which they spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying in 1887 and the mother in 1903. August Rubbert served in the regular army in Germany. William Rubbert received his education in the schools of his native country, and was fourteen years of age when he came to the United States. He has never left the Greenville farm, of which he has been the owner since his marriage, and he has made his property of ninety-five acres one of the finest of its size in the town. The buildings are in the best of repair, and are large and substantial, while the land is fertile, well graded and well fenced. General farming and dairying have claimed Mr. Rubbert's attention, and he has a fine herd of sleek well-fed cattle. Mr. and Mrs. Rubbert are members of the Lutheran Church. He is an independent voter, preferring to use his own judgment as to which is the better man for the office at stake. On February 15, 1883, Mr. Rubbert was married to Anna Rubbert, who was born in Prussia, April 28, 1864, daughter of Charles and Carrie (Kraus) Rubbert, who came to the United States in 1870 and located in Clayton township, where they first rented and later bought a farm on which the father still lives. The mother passed away in the fall of 1903. Charles Rubbert also served in the German army. Mr. and Mrs. William Rubbert have had six children, as follows: Henry, born January 6, 1884, a carpenter residing in South Dakota; Reinhold, born August 15, 1885, a farmer of Greenville township; Emma, born June 23, 1888, who married Harry Frey, a painter and paper hanger of Greenville township; Charles, born October 14, 1891; Arthur, born December 9, 1897; and Walter, born May 25, 1900, all residing at home.

GEORGE WILLIAMSEN. One of the excellent farming properties in the town of Vandenbroek is that owned by George Williamsen, a practical agriculturist and well-known and public-spirited citizen of this section. He was born April 16, 1843, in Holland, and is a son of Theodore and Wilhemina (Bunkamp) Williamsen. Theodore Williamsen was born in 1818, in Holland, and came to the United States with his wife, who was born January 6, 1809, in Zeflih, Germany, and three sons and two daughters. The family settled at once in Little Chute township on land that was owned by Mr. Williamsen and his brother-in-law, Herman Jansen and which was situated about one-half mile from the village of Little Chute. Mr. Williamsen built a little log cabin on this land and also entered other land under the homestead act, but the country was still in a wild state, there were no roads and but few neighbors, and the hardships many and the pleasures few. However, this little family had just started to realize that a home was developing, when three years after his arrival in this country, Mr. Williamsen died in 1851, when only thirty-three years of age. This would have been enough to discourage the average woman, but Mrs. Williamsen was made of sterner stuff, and in order to keep her little family together she worked day and night at washing and sewing until her sons grew old enough to contribute to the support of the family. She died December 16, 1895, at the home of her son George, who had looked after her and cared for her ever since he had been old enough to take up this responsibility. George Williamsen did not have many chances to obtain an education in his youth, as his services were needed almost continually on the home farm, and what schooling he did get was in a private institution conducted by a Mr. Bungeuar, whose wife was an Indian. When he had grown up he went to the lumber woods in the winters and worked on the home farm in summer, and when twenty-four years of age obtained land of his own, in later years purchasing the property that had been originally entered by his father and uncle. When he was twenty-eight years of age he was married to Nellie Vanderhey, who was born in Hollandtown, Brown county, Wisconsin, daughter of Cornelius Vanderhey who came to this country at the same time as did the Williamsens in 1848. Mrs. Williamsen died within three years, leaving her husband with two children, Theodore and Mary. In 1874 Mr. Williamsen was married to Hattie Bergmans, who was born in Holland, daughter of Peter Bergmans, and to this union there were born thirteen children, two who died in infancy and John, Peter, Henry, George, Elizabeth, Nellie, Stephen, Edward, Annie, Lena and Minnie. Henry and George of this family are also deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Williamsen are members of St. John's Catholic Church of Little Chute. Mr. Williamsen has always been a hard and industrious worker, and whatever success he has achieved has been through his own efforts. He is known to be a public-spirited citizen, and stands high in the esteem of his fellow townsmen.

GUSTAVE A. BEHM, a prominent farmer of the town of Ellington, is superintending the working of the Behm homestead in this town, which has been the home of the family since coming to Wisconsin. He is a son of William Behm, a native of Germany, who came to the United States in 1863, and settled on this land in Ellington, having brought with him his wife, Minnie (Trettein) Behm. Their four oldest children, Annie, Minnie, Albert and Gustave A., were born in New York and the youngest, Lena, was born in Ellington, this county. William Behm had lived in Wisconsin only fifteen months, when he enlisted for service in a Wisconsin regiment during the War of the Rebellion, and he died in the army, leaving his family to care for themselves, and in rather humble circumstances. The mother took charge of the farm, and as soon as her sons were able they worked at clearing the property. Gustave A. Behm worked out also on other farms and in the woods and on the river until 1891, and in that year took charge of the home farm, caring for his mother until her death in 1909. Mr. Behm was born November 8, 1863, and on February 15, 1894, he was married to Rosa Christian, who was born in Hortonville, Wisconsin, daughter of John B. Christian, of Hortonville. Mr. and Mrs. Behm have had seven children: two who died in infancy; Grace, who died when eight months old; and Flora Ellen, Eva Rosa, Addie May and Gustave William, residing at home. Mr. Behm has made numerous improvements to the homestead, and has been very successful in his ventures in general farming and dairy work. As a citizen he is public spirited, and he has served his township as school treasurer for some time and holds that position at present.

EDWARD G. VAN HEUKLOM, who is engaged in general and dairy farming and stock raising on a seventy-five-acre tract located in the town of Grand Chute, is one of the good, practical agriculturists of this part of Outagamie county, and has also been more or less identified with public matters here for some time, having served for the past eight years as clerk of the school board. Van Heuklom was born on the farm which he now operates, July 12, 1871, and is a son of John and Juliet (Scott) Van Heuklom, the former a native of Holland and the latter of the State of New York. They were married in Ellington town, Outagamie county. John Van Heuklom came to this country with his parents when he was but seven years of age, and the family first settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where they resided for about two years, then moving to Sheboygan and later to Appleton. When about seventeen years of age, John Van Heuklom went to Green Bay, where he was engaged in general work for about nine vears, and was then married and moved to the farm now owned by his son, Edward G., he having purchased this property several years before. He spent the balance of his life here in agricultural pursuits and died in April, 1900, his wife having passed away during the previous November. He served as school treasurer for about ten years and was one of the prominent and prosperous farmers of his locality. Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Van Heuklom, but of these Edward G. is the only survivor. He attended the district schools of Grand Chute township, and the Appleton High school, and spent his youth on the home farm. When he was twenty-two years of age he was married and took charge of the farm for one year, but previous to this time had purchased thirty-five acres in this township, on which he built a residence. After spending two years on this property, Mr. Van Heuklom returned to the old homestead, where he has since resided. He has increased the acreage of the old place from forty to seventy-five acres, and has made numerous improvements, including a barn 42x100 feet, a machine shed 50x25 feet, and a creamery 25x50 feet, with ice house attached and fully equipped with the most modern appliances. In connection with his general farming operations, Van Heuklom carried on dairying and cattle breeding, and at present has a herd of fourteen full blood cattle. The care and attention that he has given his property is evidenced by its steady growth, and his success is only one more proof of the value of scientific farming.

On November 23, 1893, Mr. Van Heuklom was married to Miss Harriet Enoch, who was born November 23, 1869, daughter of Charles and Helen (DuBois) Enoch, the former born in Belgium and the latter in New York. Mr. Enoch had not yet attained his majority when he came to the United States, and after spending some years in the East came to Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he was married. He engaged in the broommaking business, and later in the corn business, and remained in Green Bay until the death of his wife, when he sold out his business and for two years lived with Mr. and Mrs. Van Heuklom. He then went to California, where he is now engaged in cultivating an orange orchard. Mr. Enoch is a veteran of the Civil War. Mr. Van Heuklom is a member of the Congregational Church. In politics he takes an independent stand, and during the past eight years has served as clerk of the school board of Grand Chute township. He is connected with the Guernsey Cattle Club Association and the Fox River Guernsey Association. Mrs. Van Heuklom died December 10, 1909, leaving two children: George Elliott, born October 17, 1898; and Willis Alton Scott, born November 14, 1901.

REV. REEDER SMITH, deceased, was the earliest pioneer of Appleton, Wisconsin, and the one to whom more than any other was due the founding of Appleton and securing of its name. He was also the founder of Lawrence University, that institution of learning that has carried the name of this city, through its graduates, to every corner of the world. Reeder Smith was born January 11, 1804, at Pittston, Pennsylvania, in the great Wyoming Valley, a son of Rev. Newton Smith, who was a native of Connecticut. At the age of ten years the son became a member of the Methodist Church and in 1831 of the Genesee Conference, in 1840 removing to Michigan. For fifteen years his itineracy as a Methodist circuit-rider had been filled with hardship and he willingly accepted the agency of the Wesleyan Seminary at Albion, Michigan believing he was entering upon a still wider field of usefulness. Ere long the financial condition of this early church school required attention and to raise funds for its relief, Mr. Smith, in 1845, visited Boston, Massachusetts. There he presented the needs of the seminary so eloquently that a capitalist, Amos Lawrence, became much impressed and it resulted in a proposal made by Mr. Lawrence to Mr. Smith that ultimately resulted in the founding of Lawrence University. This proposal was a gift of ten thousand dollars if a literary institution should be built on a tract of 4,000 acres of land owned by Mr. Lawrence in Wisconsin, with the understanding that a like sum should be raised from outside of Boston. The location of this land, known as the Williams Grant, near Green Bay, was examined by Mr. Smith in 1847, and he reported adversely but recommended another tract twenty-five miles farther up the river. When this decision reached Mr. Lawrence he withdrew his donation and Mr. Smith returned to Boston to again present the matter, and after a month of effort convinced Mr. Lawrence of the advantages of the approved tract over the other. He was given a letter of credit by Mr. Lawrence to draw on him for the purchase of lands at the desired location, and these and additional land, bought by Smith, constituted the first plat of Appleton. This seemed wonderful progress but a still greater one confronted Mr. Smith and the Conference, the raising of the additional ten thousand dollars in order to secure the first donation. Considering that at this period all this richly developed country was almost an unbroken forest, the few settlers being of sturdy, intelligent type but with no means or ability to secure any, at that time, it was a task calculated to daunt any one but a man of burning zeal who not only had faith in an abiding Providence but unbounded faith in himself and his fellow men. To recite the many difficulties which he faced and overcame before he reached the goal of success would be but to repeat history and in the archives of Lawrence University repose the proofs of the unremitting toil, perseverance, faith and courage of this remarkable man. When the University building was erected and the preparatory school commenced, Mr. Smith retired from his agency and directed his attention more closely to the developing of Appleton. In 1858, however, on the finances of the institution becoming embarrassed, Mr. Smith made a donation to the trustees, larger in amount than any other one in Wisconsin, to relieve this condition, which by no means was the limit of his generosity to the institution. This record, incomplete as it is, is concerned with Mr. Smith in his public life but no less interesting was the domestic affairs of the family, so closely concerned as they were with his public duties. In a letter from his pen published in 1890, when he was eighty-six years of age, he remarks: "I cannot describe to you if I would, the labor and self sacrifice required of my wife and myself to reach this point in our history," meaning the establishing of their home in the wilderness of Wisconsin. In 1848, Mr. Smith and his wife journeyed to the far West, crossing Lake Michigan on the ice and penetrating into the interior in a stage coach and by means of farm wagons. To a modern civilization that demands luxuries as necessities, the courage and endurance of the forefathers and foremothers seem appalling. The first home of Mr. and Smith, was the first frame building where now stands Appleton, and in that house the first male child of Appleton was born -- A. A. Lawrence Smith. On July 6, 1846, Rev. Reeder Smith was united in marriage with Eliza Pierce Kimball, in Mt. Vernon Street Church, Boston, the ceremony being performed by Bishop Waugh, assisted by Rev. A. R. Baker and Dr. Edward N. Kirk. She was born at Rockport, Massachusetts, September 1, 1815, and died in the family residence at Appleton, January 21, 1895, the death of her husband having preceded her own by nearly three years, occurring January 25, 1892, at Appleton, at the age of eighty-eight years. Mrs. Smith was educated at Ipswich and Bradford Academies and she was trained also in vocal music by Dr. Lowell Mason, and was a member of the choir of the old Bowdoin Square Church, in Boston, with which she united in 1836, shortly after the conclusion of the pastorate of Dr. Lyman Beecher. As soon as practicable after reaching Appleton, she started the first Sunday-school, which was the nucleus of the First Methodist Church. She was so liberal minded, however, that all religious denominations received her support and the church that at present is known as the First Congregational Church of Appleton, organized in 1850, has her name as one of the original seven members. The modern church building occupies the site of the third family residence of Mr. Smith. This home being burned in 1869. Her beautiful character was shown not only in family and church life, but was a beneficial influence in society as long as she lived. She was her husband's encourager and supporter during the early days of Albion Seminary and Lawrence University, and later was the center of a group of notable women whose high aims contributed so greatly to the intellectual advancement of society at Appleton. Two sons and three daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Smith: David Byo Kimball, Amos Appleton Lawrence, Mr W. J. Allen, Mrs. H. G. Freeman and Miss Angeline Smith. In all that makes life beautiful and worth while, both Mr. and Mr Smith were examples and that Appleton has, perhaps, an unusual number of earnest, effective people whose aims are above mere social prominence or business success may justly be attributed the influence of such as these.

ARNOLD VAN DER LOOP, who for the past eighteen years has been engaged in general farming and dairying in the town of Vandenbroek, is one of the prosperous and well known farmers of his locality. He was born October 2, 1863, in Calumet county, Wisconsin, and is a son of William Van Der Loop, who came to the United States at the age of thirty-three years, with his wife, Cora (Jacobs) Van Der Loop. They settled in Calumet county, where his father, Arnold Van Der Loop, had purchased land about eight years before. William Van Der Loop later purchased property here, but afterwards moved to Brown county, and there died at the age of seventy-six years, in 1902, his widow surviving until 1910, and dying at the age of eighty years in Calumet county. Arnold Van Der Loop was one of a family of nine children, and his education was secured in the district schools of his native vicinity and the Sisters' school at Hollandtown, Brown county. As a lad he was reared to farming, and worked on his father's farm until he had attained the age of twenty-five years, when he was married to Miss Delia Gloudemans, who was born in the town of Vandenbroek, January 17, 1839, daughter of Adrian Gloudemans. Eleven children have been born to this union: Annie, born March 10, 1890; William, October 14, 1892; Cora, August 24, 1893; Martin, July 20, 1895; Mary, August 3, 1897; Hattie, April 30, 1899; Minnie, April 14, 1901; John, April 8, 1903; Henry, January 22, 1905; Peter, April 12, 1907; and Rose, April 9, 1909. At the time of his marriage, Mr. Van Der Loop rented land in Calumet county and continued to live thereon for four years, at the end of which time he came to Vandenbroek township, and in 1893 bought the property which he is now operating, a well-developed tract situated on Little Chute Rural Route No. 9. Mr. Van Der Loop has always been a hard and energetic worker, and the prosperous condition of his farm testifies to his ability as an agriculturist. He has carried on general farming and dairy work, and has given his entire time to his land, which is as highly productive as any to be found in this part of the township. He and Mrs. Van Der Loop are faithful members of St. John's Catholic Church of Little Chute.

JOSEPH LAUDON, one of the representative agriculturists of the town of Greenville, where he is the owner of two fine farms, is a self-made man, having been thrown upon his own resources early in life. and through his perseverance and determination to win has gained for himself a comfortable property. He was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, September 20, 1843, and is a son of John and Mary Laudon, both of whom died in Germany, the former when Joseph was but three years old, and the latter six years later. Joseph Laudon secured his education in the schools of his native country, where he remained until he was twenty-seven years of age, and at that time came to the United States and for some time worked as a farm hand near Chicago. He then went to work in Clayton township for five years, when he purchased seventy-seven acres of land in Greenville, which he still owns, in addition to a property of seventy-eight acres located one-half mile east. He carries on general farming and stock raising, and is known in his community as a good, practical farmer and representative citizen. He holds membership in the Lutheran Church at Greenville, and in his political belief is independent. Mr. Laudon was married March 6, 1879, in Greenville, to Mary Zachow, who was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, January 1, 1856, and who came to the United States in 1865, her brothers having preceded her to this country, they living in Clayton township. Her parents never came to this country. Mr. and Mrs. Laudon have had three children: Frank, who is residing at home and operating the farm, married Anna Manteufel; Ida, who married Bernhard Becker, a farmer operating in Ellington; and William, residing at home, and assisting in operating the homestead. Joseph Laudon is now living practically retired after a long and useful life, but he still superintends the work on his properties, although the actual labor is done by his sons, popular young farmers of this township.

PHIILLIP WELTER, a. well-known farmer of the town of Vandenbroek, was born in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, February 26, 1869, one of the six children of Phillip Welter, a native of Germany. Welter received his education in the schools of Sheboygan county, and worked on his father's farm until eighteen years of age, at which time he went to Washington (at that time Washington Territory), where he engaged in farming. He was married April 10, 1899, to Miss Katherine Ganey, who was born in Negaunee, Michigan, daughter of Richard and Katherine Ganey, natives of County Tipperary, Ireland. Mrs. Ganey came to the United States in 1849, and her husband a short time later, and after their marriage they settled for one year in Marquette, Michigan, then moving to Negaunee, where Mr. Ganey entered business and continued to operate until his death in 1894, Mrs. Ganey dying in 1877. Mrs. Welter resided with an aunt, Winifred O'Connor, who had come to this country in 1848 and settled in Philadelphia, but after five years came to Wisconsin, where she purchased land in 1875 and resided there until her death in 1897. Mr. and Mrs. Welter have four children: Irene Margaret, born October 9, 1900; Richard Phillip, born April 11, 1902; Winifred Anna, born February 16, 1905; and Emmnet William, born January 11, 1909. Mrs. Welter is affiliated with the Holy Cross Catholic Church of Kaukauna. In 1900 Mr. Welter began farming on his own account on the property on which he is now operating. He is known as a progressive and enterprising citizen and may always be counted upon to support those movements which have for their object the betterment of conditions in any way in his community. His farm is in a high state of cultivation, the buildings are adequate and substantial and the general appearance of the property testifies to his good management and ability as an agriculturist.

PETER WOLF, who for twenty-five years was engaged in farming in the town of Black Creek, was born January 17, 1851, in Washington county, this state. He was a son of George and Eva (Thomas) Wolf, who were natives of Germany and came to the United States in the '30s, first settling near Milwaukee. Peter Wolf followed agricultural pursuits all his life. In 1870 he came to Outagamie county and located on a farm of eighty acres on section 22 in the town of Black Creek, about five years later adding an additional eighty acres thereto. Iis land when he purchased it was practically in a wild condition, but before long it began to assume the appearance of a finely cultivated farm. Mr. Wolf married Emelie Bartman, a daughter of August Bartman who settled in Black Creek in 1870 having previously lived in the town of Ellington five years. The Bartman family is among the old and familiar ones of this locality and many of them are yet residing here. To Peter Wolf and wife eight children were born: George, who died when ten days old; Charles, now in California; William F., of whom appropriate mention is made elsewhere herein; John G., a farmer on the old homestead in Black Creek; Ida, the wife of Charles Minlschmidt; Anna, unmarried; Elmer E., residing in Black Creek; and Elme, who died at the age of eighteen years. Peter Wolf always followed farming and his life was passed in hard work and improving his property. He was one of the organizers of the German Lutheran Church in Black Creek, of which he was a member. He was a member of the County Board for six years and while serving as such was a member of the building committee when the present county asylum was erected. He also was town treasurer seven years and town chairman six years. In politics he was a Republican. He died August 13, 1895, followed by his widow, October 23, 1904.

COL. SAMUEL RYAN was born in Killenaule, County Tipperary, Ireland, in 1789. Because of the free expression of his opinions on affairs of State, a serious offense in those days, he was impressed as a British seaman in 1809, and was wounded on board the "Shannon" when the Chesapeake duel was fought, an engagement famous in history. He escaped from the vessel "Newark," on Lake Erie, to the United States and for a time taught school at Sacketts Harbor, New York. He married Martha Johnston in 1823, and in 1826 came to Fort Howard, Wisconsin, where for several years he served as quarter-master. He was the first justice of the peace appointed by Governor Dodge in the territory of Wisconsin, and from 1852 to 1861 was United States Receiver of the land office at Menasha. He assisted in making Indian treaties from 1830 to 1840, notably at Cedar Point, April 3, 1836, and in 1836 was colonel of the Second Regiment of Wisconsin militia. He died in 1876, aged eighty-seven years, recognized as one of the foremost men of his day in Wisconsin. To him and wife six sons and one daughter were born: Samuel, Francis A., James, John C., Henry D., David J. and Martha J.

SAMUEL RYAN, better known as Judge Ryan, was born March 13, 1824, at Sacketts Harbor, New York, and was brought to Fort Howard, Wisconsin, by his parents when but two years old. Here he learned the printer's trade, later locating at Fond du Lac where he published a paper and served as postmaster. He then removed to Green Bay and for a time published the "Spectator," succeeding which, in 1853, he came to Appleton and founded the Appleton "Crescent," the first issue of which was published February 10, 1853. This he conducted until February 18, 1862, when he enlisted in the Third Wisconsin Cavalry as Quartermaster-Sergeant. He held this position until the abolishment of the office August 30, 1862, and then returned to Appleton to resume the management of the "Crescent." He continued to guide the destinies of that publication until his appointment as consul to St. Johns, Newfoundland, in 1885. Failing eyesight compelled his resignation after a few years, and he again returned to Appleton. Previous to this he had held the positions of Justice of the Peace, county judge and school clerk. He was married three times but had no children. On March 26, 1907, he died.

FRANCIS A. RYAN, son of Col. Samuel Ryan and wife, Martha (Johnston) Ryan, was born at Fort Howard, Wisconsin, and was there educated and learned the printing business, which trade he subsequently followed in Green Bay and Chicago. He later removed to Menasha, Wisconsin, and in 1863 was appointed receiver in the United States land office and served until 1867. He then took up his residence in Appleton and here lived until his death, February 14, 1883. In 1861 he was stationed at Washington, D. C., as a member of the Clay Guards, assembled there to defend the National capitol. In the early '60s he was united in marriage with Miss Delia A. Jennison, who survives him and resides in Massuachusetts, but no children were born to them.

JAMES RYAN was born at Fort Howard, Wisconsin, March 24, 1830, and is a son of the old pioneer, Col. Samuel Ryan. He came to Appleton in the fall of 1853, was a printer by trade and for many years was business manager and editor of the "Crescent." In the year 1858 he married Mary L. Griffis, who died in 1874, and in 1885 again married taking for a wife Caroline L. Studley, who died in 1906. Mr. Ryan has served as mayor, postmaster, city treasurer and alderman for the city of Appleton and as state senator of his district. He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. His children are: Sam J. Ryan, Mrs. Mary M. Jones and Mrs. Iva M. Adams of Appleton, and Dudley Ryan of Hamilton, Ontario.

JOHN C. RYAN, one of the sons of Col. Samuel Ryan and wife, was born at Fort Howard, Wisconsin, in 1833. He learned printing at Green Bay and followed his trade at Appleton when the "Crescent" was founded. He remained here until 1859, then joined a company going to Pikes Peak, but his mining ventures were unsuccessful. While out West he was employed on the "Rocky Mountain News," but upon the discovery of gold in Montana, cast his lot with the thousands of wealth seekers and for a time engaged in mining at Bozeman and Virginia City. He was successful for a time, but through the trickery of a partner he lost his holdings. He then started to Eureka, Nevada, via Salt Lake City, and the last heard from him was at the latter place from whence he disappeared, and the supposition is that he died some years ago.

HENRY D. RYAN was born in October, 1837, at Fort Howard, Wisconsin, a son of Col. Samuel Ryan, and in 1851 came to Appleton to attend Lawrence Institute. He worked on the "Crescent" and for a time had a quarter interest therein. During the Civil War in the absence of the senior editor, Sam Ryan, Henry D. Ryan filled the position with credit. He studied law, practiced successfully many years and at the present writing takes high rank among the ablest legal practitioners in the entire west. He might properly be termed the dean of lawyers in the city of Appleton. During the early history of the city he served as treasurer, and for a number of terms was city attorney. Miss Emily C. Warner became his wife and to them these children were born: Mrs. Lura Stoppenbach of Portland, Oregon; William H. Ryan, of Niagara, Wisconsin; and Edith Ryan, at home.

DAVID J. RYAN, was born June 20, 1840, at Fort Howard, Wisconsin, and came to Appleton in the fall of 1853, attending the school taught by Daniel Huntley that winter. In 1858 he went to Menasha, where his parents had previously moved, and there attended the public school. For a time he was employed in the Menasha Woodenware Company's establishment, and in 1867 was appointed United States Receiver of Public Lands, serving until 1869. On August 5, 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Twenty-first Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry and was honorably discharged because of wounds March 23, 1863. He was twice wounded at the battle of Perryville, first through the left arm and second through the left hip. After remaining out of the service nearly a. year and a half he re-enlisted, May 15, 1864, in Company D, Forty-first Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry with rank of corporal, and on September 23, 1864, was mustered out. He then resumed work in the Menasha Woodenware Company, but in 1880 came to Appleton and has here lived ever since. He served as town clerk at Menasha two years, and since 1885 has been engaged in the coal and wood business in Appleton for himself and others. In political views he is a Democrat, and socially is a Knight Templar Mason, and Odd Fellow and a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. He never married.

MRS. MARTHA J. ALLEN was the only daughter born to the marriage of Col. Samuel Ryan and wife. Her birth occurred November 20, 1843, at Fort Howard, Wisconsin, and until her marriage resided with her parents in Appleton and Menasha. In 1868 she became the wife of John S. Robinson, who died in 1872, and ten years later she married Asa Allen, and he died that year in Dakota where they had made their home. Mrs. Allen shortly afterwards returned to Appleton and has since been a resident of this city. She has one son, Louis J. Robinson, cashier of the city postoffice in Washington, D. C.

Samuel J. Ryan, son of James Ryan, was born 1859, and educated at Lawrence college. He established the daily Crescent in October, 1890, and has managed the same ever since it was started. He was married in October, 1909, to Alice C. Doland, of Rogers Park, Illinois. Mr. Ryan has served as clerk of All Saints parish, Protestant Episcopal Church, for several years.

GREGOR DEERING, one of the prosperous and progressive farmers of Kaukauna township, is a son of Andrew Deering who came from Germany to America as a young man in 1860 and for a time operated a brewery at Hillsburg, near Hartford, Wisconsin. Andrew Deering married Kunigunde Kohl, a native of Germany who came with her parents George and Rosena (Berkel) Kohl, to the United States, and to this union were born, Annie and Gregor. The birth of the latter occurred March 29, 1863, and in the fall of that year the father was killed in his brewery. The mother and two children then returned to Germantown and for eight or nine years resided with her father; she later married Leonard Hauser, and after his death came to Kaukauna and made her home with G. Deering for ten years.

The early education of Gregor Deering was acquired in the district and parochial schools in and around Germantown, and when but twenty-four years old he bought and for ten years conducted a meat market in the city of Kaukauna. He then disposed of this as part payment for the farm he now owns in the town of Kaukauna, and has since confined his attentions to agricultural pursuits. When Mr. Deering moved onto his property there were but few improvements, but he has since erected a modern home and suitable barns and outhouses and his land is regarded as one of the fine farms of the community. In 1887 he was united in marriage with Miss Annie Werner, daughter of Mathew Werner, of Hartford, and to them one child, who died in infancy, was born. After the death of his wife, Mr. Deering married Mrs. M. A. Gloudemans, daughter of Arnold Hurkman, and the widow of Martin A. Gloudemans, who died October 13, 1889, leaving one daughter, Rose. The present Mrs. Deering, who is a native of the town of Vandenbroek, has borne Mr. Deering the following children: Matilda M. K., Agnes M., deceased, Arnold A. J., George G., Loretta T. and Charles Joseph.

Mr. Deering and wife are members of the Holy Cross Roman Catholic Church at Kaukauna.

ANTONE KATHAGEN, a progressive and industrious farmer of the town of Vandenbroek, who is operating an excellent property situated on Kaukauna Rural Route No. 11, is a native of Germany and a son of Theodore and Gertrude Kathagen, who spent their lives in the Fatherland. Mr. Kathagen came to the United States in 1891 and settled in Wisconsin. In 1893 he came to Outagamie county, and for the following ten years was employed by the day in Little Chute, at the end of that time having saved enough to purchase his present property. General farming and stock raising for his own use have claimed all of his time and attention, and he has never desired to engage in political activities, although any movement that has for its object the advancement of his community along any line will have his instant interest and support. Mr. Kathagen has never married. He is working in partnership with his brother, John Kathagen, who came from the old country to the United States with him in 1891, and they are known as industrious, conscientions workers and excellent citizens. John Kathagen married Johannah Jansen, daughter of George Jansen, and they have had eleven children, of whom two are deceased, the survivors being: Antone, Theodore, Annie, Dora, Gertrude, Marie, John, Theresa and Albert. The family is connected religiously with the Holy Cross Catholic Church of Kaukauna.

WILLIAM BREITRICK, an enterprising and progressive young farmer and stock breeder of Ellington township, who is carrying on operations on the farm of his father, was born February 26, 1885, in the town of Ellington, a son of Albert Breitrick and grandson of Carl Breitrick. The latter was born in Germany and came to the United States during the early '50s, purchasing land in Greenville township, where he died in 1891. Albert Breitrick was born in Greenville town in 1855, and was reared to agricultural pursuits, following them throughout his active career and becoming a large land owner in the town of Ellington. Since 1909 he has been retired from farming, and now makes his home in the city of Appleton. He married Bertha Saiberlick, of the town of Greenville, and they had six children. William Breitrick was educated in the schools of the neighborhood of his present farm, on which he has always lived, and of which he has had charge since his father's retirement. He carries on general farming and dairying, but his specialty is the breeding of Guernsey blooded stock, and in addition to other animals is the owner of the well-known "Heiress King of the May," No.14470. He is a member of the Guernsey Cattle Breeders Association of Fox River Valley and is regarded as an authority on this breed of cattle. In political matters he has always been a Republican. He has been prominent in the work of the Evangelical Church, to which his wife also belongs, and he is treasurer of the church missionary fund. In 1909 Mr. Breitrick was married to Anna Schilling, who was born October 15, 1883, in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, daughter of August Schilling, and to this union there has been born one child: Loren, born February 17, 1901.

ADRIAN BERGMANS, who has spent his life in agricultural pursuits in Vandenbroek town, is now the owner of the Bergmans homestead in Little Chute Rural District No. 9, in which he was born August 11, 1870. He is a son of Peter Bergmans, who was born in Holland and came to the United States with his wife, Theodora Bergmans, and their six children, John, Annie, Hattie, Hannah, Georgiana and Peter, in 1869, settling in the town of Kaukauna, south of the Fox river, and shortly thereafter going to the farm which is now owned by Adrian Bergmans. Here Peter Bergmans died in 1882, aged fifty-eight years, while his wife, who was born May 12, 1822, passed away in 1895. Adrian Bergmans was the only child of his parents to be born in this country and he received his education in the district schools of Vandenbroek township. He was reared to the life of an agriculturist and has always lived on the home farm, of which he took charge at the time of his father's death, working it on shares for his mother. When she died he bought the interests of the other heirs, and he has since made numerous improvements, both to land and buildings. He has brought this property into a high state of cultivation, and by hard work and the use of practical methods has made it one of the valuable properties of the town of Vandenbroek. In the fall of 1896, Mr. Bergmans was married to Mary Schumacher, who was born on the old Schumacher homestead in Vandenbroek, daughter of John and Minnie (Vandenhooven) Schumacher, the former a native of Germany and the latter of Holland. Mr. Schumacher came as a very early settler to Outagamie county, and spent his life in agricultural pursuits. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bergmans, namely: Dora, born October 28, 1898; Minnie, born November 2, 1899; Annie, born July 13, 1902; Emma, born April 9, 1905; Elizabeth, born May 17, 1907; and Mabel, born October 9, 1909. Mr. and Bergmans are members of St. John's Catholic Church of Little Chute. He is interested in educational matters, and has been a member of the school board for the past two years.

JOHN DRISCOLL, deceased, formerly one of Appleton's most prominent citizens and business men, a pioneer in construction work, was born March 1, 1846, in Oswego, New York, and died at Appleton, of neuralgia of the heart, April 16, 1909. He came of honest Irish parentage; the family was not blessed with worldly goods and hence the boy's early advantages were meager. When but ten years of age he worked at a man's tasks on the homestead farm, later going into the woods and laboring in the logging camps. When twenty years of age he accompanied his parents to Iowa and at McGregor, in that State, learned the brick mason's trade and during the summer months worked at that until 1873, spending his winters in the pineries and his springs driving logs. After coming to Appleton in the above year he was foreman for the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad during the construction of its line, and from that time on followed building and contracting. He built the buildings for the above railroad at Kaukauna and many large buildings in Appleton prior to 1885. In that year he formed a partnership with M. K. Gochnauer. This firm built for Appleton three miles of sewer and laid the track for the Appleton railway, reputed to be the first electric line ever constructed within the United States. They also built a horse-car railway at Sheboygan; and in 1887 they constructed the water power canal at Kaukauna and the lock at what became known as Combined Locks, requiring the continuous work of ninety-five men for five months to build the massive walls. In 1889 the firm laid a street railway at Marinette, and in the following year Mr. Driscoll superintended the building of a large iron and brass foundry at Duluth; Minnesota. In 1891 the firm relaid the street railway at Appleton and built four miles of trackage at Menominee, Michigan. In 1892-3 the firm confined their main operations to Appleton and vicinity. About 1903 the company established what is now known as the Appleton Sewer Pipe Company, in which enterprise Mr. Driscoll remained interested until 1908, when the partnership which had lasted for twenty-three years was dissolved. Mr. Driscoll then built what is known as the Driscoll Cement plant, of which he was the head until his death, since when his son continues the business. He built the first cement walk in Appleton and was firmly convinced of the value of cement blocks in all building to stand the strain of time. Mr. Driscoll was married in 1872 to Miss Ellen Scanlon, of Lebanon, Wisconsin, and they had four children: Margaret, deceased; Josephine who resides at home; May Ellen, who is the wife of William F. Kamps, cashier of the Outagamie County Bank; and Walter, who is also a resident of Appleton and the successor of his father in the Driscoll Cement plant. Mr. Driscoll and family have always been members of St. Mary's Catholic Church and he belonged to the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin and to the Knights of Columbus. In commenting on the death of Mr. Driscoll, the newspapers of Appleton paid tribute to his sterling character. An editorial notice in one of these journals says: "He commanded and deserved the respect of all who knew him well. He was an absolutely honest man in all of his relations. His word was always as good as his bond and the latter was never below par. He stood for all that was best in the civic life of the community, the state and the nation. It may be said that Mr. Driscoll was one of the class which constitutes the real backbone of this or any nation and affords the best assurance of its perpetuity -- men who, without the hope or expectation of reward and who never connive to that end, do their private and public duty in accordance with the dictates of an enlightened judgment and healthy conscience."

DAVID A. SHERMAN, a progressive agriculturist of Cicero township, is cultivating a tract of 120 acres in section 25, where he has one of the best-equipped properties of this part of Outagamie county. Mr. Sherman is a native of the Province of Ontario, Canada, born March 16, 1846, a son of James and Caroline (Sharp) Sherman, the former probably a native of New York State, the grandfather, Joseph Sherman, having been born in St. Lawrence county. David A. Sherman's parents were married in Canada, where they engaged in farming and where their children were born, being as follows: David A., Alfred, Angeline, who died in 1903; and Nettie, who married a Mr. Johnson. The family came to Osborn township, Outagamie county, in October, 1866, remaining one year and then locating in Cicero township, where Mr. Sherman bought forty acres of wild land and built a log cabin, 18x26 feet, and a log stable, and with his sons began to clear the property. Later he sold this land and went to Plainfield, Waushara county, where he lived twenty-six or twenty-seven years, and died in 1903, aged eighty-two years. His widow survived until 1907, when she passed away at the age of eighty years. David A. Sherman did not accompany his parents to Waushara county, but remained on the Cicero township farm, where he has built a log cabin and log stable. To his original purchase of eighty acres he added another forty, and he has put all of this property under cultivation with the exception of a twelve-acre tract of woodland. In October, 1869, Mr. Sherman was married to Amy Heagle, also a native of Ontario, Canada, and a daughter of Henry and Louisa (Sharp) Heagle, who came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, in 1865 and spent the rest of their lives here, both now being deceased about twenty years. Mr. and Mrs. Sherman have had these children: Lafey, who married Nora Corning; Dora, who married G. Buttles; Ina, who married G. Jackson; Maud, who married Dennis Sharp; Blanche, who married Orrin Johnson, and Lillian, James and Irma, all residing at home. Mr. Sherman has always taken a very active interest in politics, belonging to the progressive Republicans, and he has served as supervisor of Cicero township, town clerk for three years and chairman of the town board for one year. Mr. Sherman has a fine nine-room residence, and in addition has one of the finest barns in the township. His first barn, a log structure, was removed to make way for a barn 36x60 feet, which was later remodeled to become 36x88 feet, with basement under all and well lighted. It has a modern cement floor, and the basement is equipped with James' Sanitary Feed Mangers and Stanchions, for which Mr. Sherman is the agent for this section. The drainage system is modern, the barn being piped for flushing and cleanliness, and the barn itself is built of matched six-inch lumber, and equipped from loft to basement with galvanized ventilator shafts, which insure perfect ventilation. The upper driveway is double, one being eighteen feet and the other twelve feet. Within a few feet of the barn is situated a sanitary artesian well, around which the creamery is built. Mr. Sherman, who is known as one of the good, practical agriculturists of Cicero township, has also a wide reputation as a scientific cattle raiser and is known as an expert judge of livestock.

JOHN MOLITOR, a substantial agriculturist and public-spirited citizen of the town of Vandenbroek, has been closely identified with the agricultural and public interests of his community for many years and stands high in the esteem of his fellow-townsmen. He was born at De Pere, Wisconsin, November 3, 1846, and is a son of Philipp and Annie Molitor, natives of Prussia who came to the United States in 1845 with their three children, Stephen, Mary Anne and Margarette. Philipp Molitor was born in Prussia, August 10, 1809, and died March 27, 1898. Upon coming to this country. The family first settled at De Pere, Wisconsin, where they resided for about one year and six months, Mr. Molitor engaging in farming, and in 1847 removed to Outagamie county, where he entered Government land, this becoming the Molitor homestead. On this property Philipp Molitor died, his wife having passed away in 1870, when in her sixtieth year. They had two children born in America of whom John was the eldest. Philipp Molitor was one of the pioneers of his section of Outagamie county, and for a number of years the family home was a log cabin, but as the years went by he increased his acreage, added to his farming utensils and became one of the substantial men of his cominmunity, serving as town chairman for several terms and as a director of the first school board. He was always interested in the cause of education, having been a schoolmaster in his native country, and tried to give his children the best of advantages along this line. John Molitor worked on his father's farm until the age of twenty-one years, at which time he rented his present property from his father, who at that time was serving as station agent for the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad in the village of Little Chute, a position which he held for nearly eight years. April 30, 1871, Mr. Molitor was married to Mary Knoll, who was also a native of Prussia, and came to the United States with her mother, who first settled in the State of New Jersey and then came to Outagamie county. Mr. and Mrs. Molitor have had six children, one of whom, Ardina, died in 1890, when thirteen years old, while the survivors are: Philipp, born May 4, 1872, married Hatty Jansen, September 29, 1897, and has three children, Annie, born August 21, 1899, Mary, January 2, 1903, and Mathias, July 9, 1907; Minnie, born May 1, 1874; Peter, born February 2, 1878; Michael, born August 27, 1879; and Elizabeth, born October 17, 1881, married Joseph Schumaker, of Appleton, September 11, 1907, and is the mother of two children, Margery, born September 22, 1908, and Philipp, born June 7, 1911. Mrs. Molitor died in 1887, when forty years of age, in the faith of St. John's Catholic Church, of Little Chute, of which Mr. Molitor is a consistent member. At present he is a director of the school board, of which he has been a member for four years, and he has also served for nine years as clerk of the board, as a member of the side board for three years and as a trustee of the village of Little Chute for five years. He has brought his farm into an excellent condition, and is known among his fellow-townsmen as a good, practical agriculturist and public-spirited citizen.


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17-Jan-2005