Part 11 | History of Outagamie County, Wisconsin. Thomas Henry Ryan. Part 13 | Part 13

MARTIN SMITS, an enterprising and progressive agriculturist of Grand Chute, operating a fine tract of eighty acres, which he devotes to general and dairy farming, was born in Holland, January 16, 1869, and is a son of George and Marie (Rutten) Smits, farming people of Holland, who never left that country. Of their eight children, Martin was the sixth in order of birth. He received his education in the public schools of his native country, and at the age of twenty-one years started out to make his own way in the world, working for two years as a farm hand in Holland and then coming to America. He first located at DePere, in Wisconsin, where he worked in brick yards for seven years, after which he decided to devote his life to agricultural pursuits, and made his way to Outagamie county. For the first two years here he worked as a farm hand, and for a like period he operated a rented farm, but at the end of this time he had accumulated enough to invest in his present property, which he has since been conducting with very satisfactory results. He carries on general farming, and does some dairying, and has his eighty acres in a high state of cultivation, raising large crops annually. He has erected good, substantial buildings, and his property has the appearance of being conducted by a man of thrift and industry. Mr. Smits is a Republican, but he has never given much attention to political matters, having been too busy with his private interests, although he is always ready to help any movement which promises to be of benefit to his community. His religious connection is with St. Joseph's Catholic Church .

On November 7, 1905, Mr. Smits was married to Christina Nielen, who was born in Buchanan township, June 25, 1876. Her parents were born in Holland and came to America about 1860, locating in Milwaukee, where Mrs. Smits' father worked in a foundry for about ten years, and then removed to Buchanan township, Outagamie county. In 1876 the family moved to the farm where they now reside. Mrs. Smits was the third child of her parents' seven children. Mr. and Mrs. Smits have four children, born as follows: George, July 30, 1906; Marie, December 23, 1907; Dorothy, July 8, 1909, and Alice, January 20, 1911 .

CORNELIUS MEYER, one of the old and honored residents of Grand Chute township, who is now living practically retired in a handsome residence which he has just completed, was born in the Province of North Brabant, Netherlands, near the Belgium line, January 16, 1842, a son of Jacob and Johanah (Shoemacher) Meyer, the former born in North Brabant September 19, 1797, and the latter in Dordrecht, South Holland, December 15, 1798. Jacob Meyer nor his wife ever came to America, he following his trade of tanner in his native city, where he also served as clerk, and for a number of years was treasurer of a certain district. Cornelius Meyer received his education in the school of the place of his nativity, and was the youngest son of his parents and the next to the youngest of fourteen children. In 1868 Mr. Meyer came to America, whence two brothers had preceded him, and later another brother and three sisters came to this country. The four brothers became the owners of a tract of ninety acres of land, and after eleven years, Cornelius Meyer took forty acres on his own account, located in the northern part of Grand Chute township. This property was but partly improved, and during the first few years Mr. Meyer's time was principally devoted to putting the rest of the land under cultivation, working hard in clearing the land from brush and timber and getting it ready so that crops could be planted, but eventually this task was accomplished, and he continued to carry on farming there with great success until March 27, 1910, when he sold out and moved to his present place, which he had purchased three years previous. He has just completed building a concrete block residence, which is up to date in every respect and is equipped with all the most modern appliances and conveniences. He originally owned fifteen acres here, but has sold several building lots along the river front. His barn is also concrete and admirably constructed for the housing and care of domestic animals, farm produce and machinery, tools, etc. Residence and barn necessitated the expenditure of about $5,000. Here he and Mrs. Meyer expect to spend the remaining years of their lives .

On June 25, 1876, Mr. Meyer was married to Maria Elizabeth Von Beuningen Von Helsdingen, born in the Province of Gelderland, daughter of Reinier and Maria Katharine (Ormeling) Von Helsdingen, natives of Amsterdam, who never came to America. They had a family of thirteen children, Mrs. Meyer being the next to the youngest. Mrs. Meyer's father was a minister of the Dutch Reformed Church. She came to the United States in 1876 and was met in New York by Mr. Meyer, who brought her on to Appleton, where they were married, June 25, 1876. They have had two children, the first of whom died in infancy, while the other, Jacob Cornelius, born October 10, 1878, resides four and one-half miles north of Appleton, and is carrying on farming operations near Apple Creek. He married Grace Collins, and they have had five children, of whom one is deceased. Mr. Meyer was a member of the Reformed Church in Holland, but since residing in America has been connected with the Congregational denomination. In political views he is a Republican .

ALBERT JOHN WEST. One of the best-equipped dairy farms in Outagamie county is that owned by Albert John West in Grand Chute township, an excellent tract of eighty acres which he has been operating for the past eight years. Mr. West was born at Kaukauna, Wisconsin, June 24, 1864, a son of Theodore and Wilhelmina (Hendricks) West, natives of Holland. Theodore West in early life was engaged in a mercantile business at Little Chute, but later became a farmer in Freedom township, where he resided until the death of his wife, in 1886, when he sold his farm, retired from activities and went to Kaukauna to live, but later removed to the home of his son, Albert John, with whom he now resides. He and his wife had a family of nine children: Albert John; George, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Henry, farming in Kaukauna township; Nellie, the wife of Jacob Ebben, a Freedom township farmer; Anna and Theodore, who are deceased; John, a papermaker of the State of Maine; Nicholas, who is deceased; and Peter, a carpenter of Kaukauna. Albert John West received his education in the common schools of Little Chute, and when he had passed his fifteenth birthday went to work in the lumber camps as assistant to the cook one winter, and during the eight years that followed engaged in dredging during the summer months and lumbering in the winters. After his marriage he was employed on the farm of Judge Meyer for about four years, after which he rented the farm until 1902, and in this year bought the place. He has eighty-one acres, all well cultivated, fully equipped with modern buildings which, in turn, are fitted throughout with the latest appliances and improvements with safeguards for cleanliness and hygiene. He keeps thirty-two head of fine dairy stock .

On June 28, 1887, Mr. West was married to Anna Meyer, born in Freedom township, Outagamie county, April 19, 1864, daughter of Albert and Mary (Vanderlinden) Meyer, natives of Holland, who came to the United States and located in Outagamie county. Mr. Meyer engaged in farming, and became the owner of a valuable property situated one mile west of Mr. West's farm. After residing there for about, thirty years he removed to Little Chute, where he is now living retired. He and his wife had ten children: Anna, the wife of Mr. West; Vincent, a farmer of Chili, Wisconsin, Jacob, who is deceased; Elizabeth, wife of Fred Volkman; Mary, wife of George West, brother of Albert John; John, who is deceased; Dora, wife of Peter Nieling, a furniture dealer and undertaker of Little Chute; Frances, wife of Theo Weyenberg, a papermaker of Little Chute, and two children who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. West have had seven children: John, born March 7, 1888, town clerk of Grand Chute, residing near his father's farm; Wilhelmina, born June 12, 1889, single and residing at home; Agatha, born February 5, 1892, an artist of much talent, residing with her parents; Theodore, born October 2, 1894; Mary, born July 19, 1896; Albert, born February 4, 1898; and Francis, born December 26, 1902, who died aged seven months. Mr. West is a member of St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church at Appleton, and is connected with the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Catholic Knights. In political matters he is independent, and he has never aspired to public office .

JOHN VANDENBERG. The farming interests of Outagamie county are in the hands of efficient, capable men who have given to their labor that application of scientific effort that is bound to bring the best results. Years of observance of the best methods have brought the occupation of farming up to the standard of one of the sciences, and the constant improving of farming machinery has done wonders in making the harvesting of large crops a certainty. John Vandenberg, one of the scientific farmers of Grand Chute township, was born March 16, 1860, in Little Chute township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, a son of John and Mary (Vandenberg) Vandenberg. The parents of Mr. Vandenberg were both born in Holland, in which country they were married, and came to America in 1858, locating in Little Chute, where Mr. Vandenberg worked on the canal for a few years and then bought a little farm in what is called Brookstown, which he cultivated until his death in 1903, his widow surviving him but a few years. They were the parents of six children: Peter, a merchant of Marinette; John; Mary, the wife of Henry Van Gompel, a farmer of Little Chute; Anton, a farmer of Brookstown; Henry, a farmer of Buchanan township; and George, a motorman on the interurban line, Little Chute. John Vandenberg secured his education in the schools of his native district, and resided at home until his marriage, although he worked out among the farmers of Little Chute township. He then secured employment in the Little Chute mill, where he continued to work until 1907, and in that year purchased the farm which he now operates, a tract of fifty-two acres which he devotes to general and dairy farming. He is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and belongs to the old Catholic organization known as Saint Johns. In politics he is a Democrat, but he has been too busy to engage actively in any matters of a public nature .

On October 11, 1886, Mr. Vandenberg was married to Miss Katie Verhagen, born in Brookstown, in 1864, daughter of Henry and Hattie Van Hammond Verhagen, early settlers of Brookstown and natives of Holland. Mrs. Vandenberg was left an orphan at a tender age, and she was adopted by Mr. and Mrs. Adrian Vanroy, of Little Chute, with whom she made her home until her marriage. She had three brothers: John, a farmer of Grand Chute; Albert, an employe of the Kimberly paper mill; and Adrian, a farmer of Chili, Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Vandenberg have had six children, namely: Mary, born June 8, 1888; Hattie, born November 11, 1890; Anna, born December 2, 1892; Henry, born February 12, 1895; Helen, born January 21, 1899; Tillie, born May 24, 1903 .

FRANK H. COLBURN, a well-known newspaperman of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who is publisher of the Shiocton News and the Black Creek Times, was born August 11, 1870, in Merrillan, Jackson county, Wisconsin, a son of George W. and Harriet (Stiles) Colburn, natives of New York State and Vermont, respectively. They came to Wisconsin during the early days with their parents, locating in Walworth county, from whence they removed to Jackson county in about 1868, continuing to reside there for twenty years. In 1888 they went to California, where Mr. Colburn died in 1903, aged seventy-five years, while his widow survives him and makes her home there, she having attained the advanced age of eighty-four years. George W. Colburn was a wagonmaker and wheelwright by trade, occupations which he followed throughout a long and active life. Frank H. Colburn was the youngest of his parents' five children, and he secured his education in the public schools and the Black River Falls high school. After graduating from the latter institution, he was for four years engaged as bookkeeper for a lumber firm, and at the end of that time learned the printer's trade. In 1897 he came to Shiocton and established the Shiocton News, and in 1904 he purchased the Black Creek Times, both papers being now under his management. Mr. Colburn is a live, up-to-date newspaperman, with an inherent ability for securing news and the gift for writing pithy, opportune editorials. He is a Republican in politics, and served as clerk of the town board of Bovina for six years, and after the organization of the village of Shiocton in 1903 as clerk of the village for four years. He is now a member of the village board, and has also served as justice of the peace. Fraternally he is connected with the Masons, the Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America. He and his family attend the Congregational Church .

In 1897 Mr. Colburn was married to Miss Margaret Stanfield, who was born August 4, 1870, daughter of J. F. Stanfield, a well-known resident of Waupaca, Wisconsin, and to this union there have been born two children: Harriet N. and James S., both attending school .

RUDOLPH D. FISHER, a well-known citizen of Shiocton, Wisconsin, where he is the proprietor of a large mercantile establishment, is a native of this village, born April 20, 1879, a son of Louis and Elizabeth (Kahn) Fisher, natives of Germany. They came to America as young people and almost immediately located in Wisconsin, where they were married, at which time Mr. Fisher engaged in the mercantile business. Mr. Fisher became one of the prosperous merchants of Shiocton, and the regard in which he was held by his fellow townsmen was indicated by his election to various township offices, including that of township treasurer for several terms, was a Republican in politics, and a popular member of the Odd Fellows fraternal order. Mr. Fisher died in 1888, when but forty-two years old, his widow surviving until 1898, when she died at the age of fifty-two, and both were buried in the Zion Cemetery at Appleton. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher were the parents of five children, namely: Joseph, who is married and living in Dodgeville, Wisconsin; Rose who married Herman Hiller of Dodgeville, and has one child; Belle, who married J. F. Morse of Lewiston, Idaho; Rudolph D.; and Clara, who is single and living with her brother, Rudolph D .

Rudolph D. Fisher received his education in the public schools of Shiocton and graduated from the high school at New London in 1897, immediately after leaving which he entered the mercantile business established by his father, which was then being conducted by his mother. At the time of the latter's death, in 1898. Mr. Fisher took charge of the store, and four years later, in 1902, he bought the interests of the other heirs and has conducted it alone to the present time. This is the oldest established business in Shiocton, and under Mr. Fisher's able management has grown steadily, his policy of fair dealing and moderate prices having built up a large patronage. He is a Republican in political belief, and from the time the village was incorporated until 1911 he served as village trustee, a period of about seven years. He was reared in the faith of the Hebrew denomination, but is not at present connected with any particular church. Fraternally he has attained to the degree of Royal Arch Mason, and he is also a member of the Odd Fellows and the F. R. A .

CHARLES WITTHUHN, who has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in Outagamie county for more than forty years, is now carrying on operations on a tract of 120 acres located in Bovina township. He was born September 24, 1849, in Germany, a son of Frederick and Mary (Walter) Witthuhn, natives of Germany who came to the United States in 1870 and settled in Outagamie county, where they lived until their deaths, the father passing away in 1876 at the age of seventy-eight years, and the mother in 1877 when sixty-nine years old, and both were buried in Greenville. Mr. Witthuhn was a wagonmaker by trade, at which he worked in the old country, but after coming to America he lived on the farm with his children. He and Mrs. Witthuhn had three children: Matilda, Ernest and Charles. Matilda married Ernest Greinert, in Germany, and came to the United States with her parents, dying in Wisconsin, November 28, 1878, when she left three children, all of whom are now living. When the family first came to Wisconsin, Ernest and Charles Witthuhn purchased 120 acres of land, where Charles Witthuhn now lives, it being raw and undeveloped and without buildings, but they immediately started to erect a home for the family, and soon had started the work of breaking the ground for the first crop. The farm is now one of the best of its size in this part of Bovina township, eighty acres being cleared and in a high state of cultivation, and the entire property well fenced, principally witlh barbed wire, although some woven wire has been put in. A large basement barn was erected by Mr. Witthuhn in 1902, and the other buildings have been kept in an excellent state of preservation. He makes a specialty of feeding fine Holstein cattle and does truck gardening and raises sugar beets. Ernest Witthuhn is married and resides in Shiocton, having retired from active pursuits .

In 1875 Charles Witthuhn was married to Miss Louisa Dikelman, who was born November 27, 1851, who came to America from Germany with her aunt, her parents, J. and Fredericka Dikelman, never leaving the Fatherland. Mr. and Mrs. Witthuhn have had seven children: Annie, who married Ernest Spoehr, of Bovina township; Antonia, who married William Immel, of Ellington township; Bertha, the wife of William H. Spoehr, of Bovina township, Amanda, who married Henry Krug, of Forest township, Fond du Lac county; George, who is married and in the hardware business at Algonquin, Illinois; and Henry and Arnold, who are single and living at home. Mr. Witthuhn is a Republican in politics and he has served two years as supervisor of Bovina township. He is a trustee and active member of the German Methodist Church, and the services up to the present time have been held in his home .

EDWARD PIERCE, an old and honored resident of Bovina township, Outagamie county, was for many years engaged in other occupations before he took up farming as a vocation, and during the comparatively short period that he has engaged in agricultural operations here has become one of the successful farmers of this section. He was born August 20, 1841, in Ireland, son of Edward and Mary (Wall) Pierce, natives of the Emerald Isle, who emigrated to Canada in 1856 and settled in County Huron, where both died. They had a family of nine children, and Edward, who was the third in order of birth, remained with his parents until he had attained the age of twenty-three years, at which time he commenced working for himself. Four years later he began shipping tanbark and lumber on commission from Port Albert, Canada, but after fifteen years spent in this business he came to the United States and settled in Oshkosh, where for nine years he was employed in the sash and door factory. He then engaged in teaming and contracting and in building streets for about six years, and in the fall of 1897 purchased the farm which he now owns, then all raw, undeveloped land. After building a small house, he commenced to clear his land, and he now has ninety-six acres, located in sections 9 and 16, all under cultivation and fenced with barbed and woven wire. In the spring of 1906 he built a fine basement barn. Mr. Pierce carries on general farming and stock raising, keeping Poland China and Chester White hogs and Holstein cattle; carries on dairying to some extent, separating his cream and selling it, raises cabbages and onions for the market, and also sells the fruit from his young orchard of 175 trees. In politics he is a Democrat, and he has served as justice of the peace for five years and as road commissioner two years .

In 1867 Mr. Pierce was married to Mrs. Mary Hawkins, widow of Henry Hawkins, born October 28, 1843, in Islington, a suburb of London, England, the second of the three children born to Thomas and Ann Joy, natives of London, who emigrated to Canada in 1853 and settled in Toronto, the father passing away in that city, while the mother died at Port Albert. Mrs. Pierce had three children by her first marriage, two of whom died in infancy, while the other, Ann G., married E. E. Beals, of Oshkosh, and has five children. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce have had seven children, namely: Alice L., who married E. G. Grove, of Waukesha, and died in 1890, leaving one child; Harold; Edward V., who is single and living at home; Harry W., who married Bertha Schwalm, of Oshkosh, and has two children; Jeannette, who is single and living at home, being employed as clerk in a store at Oshkosh; George H., who married Margaret McIntyre, of Oshkosh; and William A., who married Jessie A. Cooley, of Outagamie county, and has two children. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce are members of the Episcopal Church .

WILLIAM P. MCCARTHY, whose excellent farm of 181 acres is located in Center township, is one of the well-known agriculturists of his section and a son of pioneer parents. He was born December 19, 1875, on his father's farm in Center township, a son of Stephen and Margaret (Stoffel) McCarthy. Stephen McCarthy was born in Ireland, in December, 1821, and in about 1848 left County Tipperary for the United States, landing at New York. After a period covering ten years spent in hard, faithful work on a New York farm, he had accumulated enough money to purchase a team of oxen, a wagon and several other necessities, in addition to sending money home to his mother in Ireland, his father having died when he was about ten years old. With his team and wagon he came to Outagamie county in 1858, having purchased the land three years before without seeing it, and here he built a log cabin and settled down to clear the farm from the wilderness. As soon as he was able he sent to the old country for his mother, who came and lived near him, on the land which now belongs to William P. McCarthy. Mr. McCarthy was married November 2, 1862, to Margaret Stoffel, who was born January 25, 1842, in Germany, daughter of Michael and Margaret Stoffel. Michael Stoffel walked from Milwaukee, whence he had come in 1854, to Madison, and then on to Outagamie county, finally settling in Grand Chute township, where he was engaged in farming until his death at the age of eighty years. Stephen P . McCarthy died August 11, 1891, but his widow still survives him and makes her home with her son, John .

William P. McCarthy received his education in the schools of his neighborhood and the Sisters' school at Mackville, attending during the winter months, while the summers were spent in the hard work of the home farm, as was the custom of farmers' sons at that time. He always worked at home for his father, and when the latter died he inherited 107 acres west of the present place. Here he resided until he was thirty-two years old, at which time he bought the farm which he now cultivates, a fine tract of 181 acres, where he has carried on general farming and dairying. Mr. McCarthy's sister, Mary, lives with him and takes care of the duties of the household. In his political views Mr. McCarthy is a Democrat. He is connected with St. Edward's Catholic Church at Mackville .

FRED W. HOEFER, city marshal of Appleton, Wisconsin, who has been connected with this branch of the public service since 1877, was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, October 1, 1847, and is a son of Thomas and Philipina (Knester) Hoefer, natives of Germany, who came to Wisconsin in 1841. Thomas Hoefer, who was a farmer by occupation, served as justice of the peace during his later years and died August 14, 1857, at Mayville, Dodge county, Wisconsin. Of his family of five children, one died in infancy and four sons grew to manhood. Fred W. Hoefer received a common school education and at the age of eleven years began working out as a farm hand. He came to Appleton in 1862, from whence in the fall of 1863 he enlisted in Company G, Third Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Cavalry, being at that time but sixteen years of age, and served until the close of the war. After making an excellent war record and securing his honorable discharge at the close of hostilities, he returned to Appleton and worked in the factories until April 13, 1877, at which time he became a member of the Appleton police force. On January 1, 1882, he was appointed to the position of city marshal, or chief, resigning from that office on January 1, 1885, to serve in the office of sheriff, to which he had been elected. On April 19, 1887, he was appointed a patrolman, and on April 9, 1890, was again appointed city marshal and has served faithfully in this capacity, to the present time. Marshal Hoefer is the oldest city marshal (chief of police) in point of servitude in the ranks of police officials in the State of Wisconsin, and his service has always been such as to deserve the highest praise. In November, 1872, he was married to Augusta Krueger, of Appleton, daughter of Gottlieb Krueger, and to them have been born a family of seven children: Thomas A., of Pueblo, Colorado; Oscar H.; Lawrence E. and Laura P., twins, the former a resident of Spokane, Washington, and the latter residing at home; Mrs. E. H. Brooks, of Appleton; William E., a resident of Kansas City; and Charles, who died in infancy .

Mr. Hoefer is a member of George B. Eggleston Post, Grand Army of the Republic; the Modern Woodmen of America; the Equitable Fraternal Union; the Odd Fellows; and Waverly Lodge, No. 51, A. F. & A. M., and Appleton Chapter, No. 47, of the Masonic fraternity .

WILLIAM H. HACKLEMAN, who is well known to the citizens of Appleton as the proprietor of the jewelry establishment located at No. 1009 College avenue, has been engaged in this business here for some years, and has also a large practice as an optician. He is a native of Connersville, Indiana, born in 1881, a son of J. W. and Martha A. Hackleman, farming people of Indiana, the latter of whom is deceased. William H. Hackleman was the fifth of the six sons of his parents, and he received his preliminary education in the public schools of his native locality. Later he took a polytechnic course in the Bradley Institute at Peoria, Illinois, and later spent one year at Toulon, that state, as a student of horology. After being employed for two years at McGregor, Iowa, in the jewelry business, Mr. Hackleman came to Appleton in 1905, opening his present establishment, where he has since built up a large and lucrative trade. Mr. Hackleman was married to Miss Bessie Miller, of McGregor, Iowa, who died in 1907, leaving one son: John Willard Wesley, who is now four years of age. Mr. Hackleman is a member of the Equitable Fraternal Union. He is religiously connected with the Congregational Church, while his political belief is that of the Republican party .

EVERETT H. BROOKS, M. D., one of the leading members of Appleton's medical profession, who is a specialist in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat, was born at Bloomington, Wisconsin, in 1872, and is a son of Jesse and Josephine Brooks. Jesse Brooks, who was a farmer and dealer in farming machinery, and who served as justice of the peace for a number of years, died at Bloomington, where his widow still survives. They had a family of five boys and two girls, and Everett H. was the fourth in order of birth. He secured a high school education in Bloomington, after which he attended Hahnemann Medical College at Chicago, being graduated therefrom in 1897. During the following year he was located at the hospital as house surgeon in Hahnemann Hospital, Chicago, and for two years thereafter was assistant medical director of the Mudlavian Springs Sanitarium, also later being engaged in a general country practice at Bloomington. Selling out his practice, Dr. Brooks made a trip to Germany, studying a special line of work at Vienna, and later going to London, and in April, 1902, returned to Appleton, where he has since been engaged in practice as a specialist in eye, ear, nose and throat diseases. His practice is not confined to Appleton, as his reputation has extended over an area that reaches as far as Chicago, which city he visits in a professional way a number of times each year. Dr. Brooks is a member of the County, State, National, City and Fox River Valley medical associations, and is a member of the Masons, the Eastern Star, the Elks, the Woodmen, the Mystic Workers, and the Appleton Golf and Appleton Boat clubs. In 1906 Dr. Brooks was married to Margaret Louise Hoefer, daughter of Fred W. and Augusta (Krueger) Hoefer, the former Chief of Police of Appleton, and they have had one daughter, Virginia Louise, aged three years. Mrs. Brooks is a member of the Christian Science Church.

MRS. DEBORAH COOLEY PRATT, one of the most venerable residents of Appleton and one of the most highly esteemed, whose long, useful and comparatively peaceful life has very nearly bridged a century, has been a resident of Wisconsin for many years, but is a native of New York. She was born at Attica, March 17, 1815, when a large part of her native state was yet an Indian frontier and when the main topics of the day were the close of the War of 1812, the introduction of steam, the invention of the cotton gin, and the possible building of the great Erie Canal across New York, which would be a wonderful piece of engineering. Mrs. Pratt saw that accomplished before her marriage to Miles Pratt, which took place in 1836. Seven children were born to this union, two of whom are still living: Mrs. E. R. Spaulding, of Appleton, and E. M. Pratt, of Milwaukee. Her eight grandchildren are: F. J. Harriman, F. E. Harriman, Dr. Harry K. Pratt and Miss Della Whitford, all of Appleton; Mrs. Flora Perry, of Pomona, California; Mrs. Carl Lord, of Keysville, Virginia; and Mabel and Alice Pratt, of Milwaukee . There are fifteen great-grandchildren and also two great-great-grandchildren. In the comfort, happiness and future of all these descendants the venerable lady is happily interested. Time has touched her with a light hand. In spite of her weight of years she is in excellent health of body and was never more vigorous in mind and not only enjoys social and family intercourse but preserves a lively interest in all that transpires in the great outside world. She looks back over a happy past and into the future with clear vision. She is affectionately known to everyone as "Grandma Pratt."

JOHN HARTSWORN, a prosperous and progressive young farmer of Center township, Outagamie county, is a member of a family that for three generations has carried on agricultural pursuits in this section of the country. His grandfather, Henry Hartsworn, was a native of Germany and came to the United States as a young man, settling with his wife, Mary, near Milwaukee, and later on removing to Center township, where he took up wild land and carried on farming up to the time of his death. His son, Frederick, the father of John Hartsworn, was born near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1850, and was married to Anna Sitts, a native of Center township. Frederick Hartsworn followed the example of his father and took up wild land, clearing it from the forest and making it into a good farm. He and his wife had eleven children, and of these John Hartsworn was born July 16, 1879. He was reared on the home farm, and when he could be spared was allowed to attend the district schools of his neighborhood. He was brought up to the hard work of the farm, and took that up for his life occupation, and in 1903, when his father died, he came into possession of the home place, which he has continued to operate to the present time. As a youth he had learned the carpenter's trade, a vocation which he followed for some time in conjunction with farming, but he now devotes all of his attention to his agricultural interests and has one of the well-cultivated, valuable and fine-appearing farms of Center township. Mr. Hartsworn belongs to the Reformed Church, at Dale, Wisconsin. His political faith is that of the Republican party, but he has never cared to spare time from his farming duties to engage in politics with the idea of securing public preferment. He has never married and resides on the home place with two sisters and a younger brother .

FERDINAND PURATH. In naming the representative citizens of any community, it is invariably found that among the most prominent are men who started in life with little or no advantages either of educational or financial nature and worked their way to the top through their own industry and perseverance. Ferdinand Purath, one of the self-made men of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who is now engaged in operating a finely cultivated farm of 200 acres in Center township, is a son of Frederick Purath, a native of Germany. Frederick Purath was reared in his native country, where he served his time in the German army, and came to the United States at the age of thirty-two years. He came from New York to Milwaukee, where he remained three years working as a carpenter, and spent five years in like manner at Hartford, after which he located in Center township, where he bought land. He was engaged in agricultural pursuits here until he was about sixty-five years old, when he retired from active life and went to Appleton, where he died at the age of eighty-three years. Frederick Purath married Doretta Rietz, also a native of Germany, and they had a family of six children. Frederick Purath served as a soldier during the War of the Rebellion, being a member of the Forty-seventh Wisconsin Volunteers, from which he received his honorable discharge at the close of the war .

Ferdinand Purath was born July 13, 1858, in Dodge county, Wisconsin, and his education was secured in the district schools of Outagamie county, but when there was work to do on the home farm he was compelled to do his share, whether his education suffered or not. The farm was located in the solid woods, and the boys worked through the long summers and winters, from dawn to dark, helping their father to claim it from the wilderness. When but fifteen years of age, Mr. Purath began working out on other farms in his neighborhood, at first receiving fifteen dollars per month, and later, when he was a little older, being paid eighteen dollars and his board. When he was twenty-two years old he had accumulated enough money to justify his striking out on his own account, and he bought what is now a beautiful, well-cultivated farm, then but a mass of wild country covered with stones and stumps, but after years of unending, untiring labor he converted it into one of the best farms in Center township. When he bought the land there was a little frame house standing on it, and this was Mr. Purath's home for twelve years, when the present commodious residence was built. He carries on general farming, having 200 acres under cultivation, and has met with the success that has been due his earnest efforts .

In 1881, Mr. Purath was married to Miss Mary Gorges, daughter of Godfrey and Wilhelmina (Neiland) Gorges, natives of Germany, who came to Wisconsin and were engaged in farming in Center township. Mr. Gorges lost his life in the last battle of the Civil War, in which he was serving as a soldier in the Union army. To Mr. and Mrs. Purath there have been born seven children: Walter, born in 1895, who died at the age of one year, sixteen days; one child which died in infancy; Sylvia, born in 1887; Etta, born in 1889, and Elsa, born in 1891; Annie, born in 1893, and Elma, born in 1901. Of the living children all are at home except Elsa, who married Alfred Wirth of Center township. The family are members of the Evangelical Church in Center. In politics Mr. Purath is a Republican, and for six years served as treasurer of the district schools .

WILLIAM MEYER. In looking for a reason for personal success the seeker invariably finds that the men who rise above their fellows are those who have kept everlastingly at what, they started out to accomplish, and through sheer perseverance surmount all obstacles and work their way to the front. It is doubly hard for those who have had no advantages during their youth, for they find that the others have an early start over them, and yet it is found that some of our most successful men are those who have been compelled to make their own way from earliest youth. One of the self-made men of Outagamie county, who is carrying on agricultural operations on a tract of 160 acres lying in Center township, is William Meyer. He is a son of Frederick Meyer, who was born in Germany and came to the United States as a young man, landing at New York and going thence to Milwaukee, where he was engaged in butchering until 1859, when he came to Center township and bought twenty acres of land. Here he spent the rest of his life in farming. In 1855 he was married to Katherina P. Kohlie, who was born in Germany, and they had a family of four children .

William Meyer was born January 17, 1857, near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and he was three years old when the family came to Center township. He was reared on the home farm, and secured a good education in the district schools, the father insisting that the boys should have all the advantages that tuition could give them. As a youth, William Meyer preferred farming to any other vocation, but he was put at the carpenter's trade, and followed it for fifteen years, during which time he saved every cent he had and put it into land. His first purchase was a tract of two acres, on which he erected a house, and he gradually added to the land, little by little, clearing away the stumps and stones, and breaking the ground for crops. This steadfast, persevering labor was bound to accomplish results, and he is now the possessor of one of the finely cultivated farms of Center township, covering 160 acres. His present handsome home was erected in 1900, the other having been destroyed by fire, and the large barns were built in 1895, there also being a full number of other buildings on the premises .

On November 15, 1878, Mr. Meyer was married to Mary Nahls, daughter of Frederick and Mary (Russ) Nahls, of Center township. Mrs. Meyer, who was born in Germany, came to the United States with her parents when she was a small girl. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Meyer, namely: Ida, who married Fred Boether, a farmer of Manitowoc county, has two children, Irene and Mildred; William, of Center township, married Mata Koepka, and has one child, Millie; Delia, who married Edwin Schroeder, of Black Creek, has one son, Lawrence; and Emma, who married Fred Bullard, of Escanaba, has a daughter, Chrystal. When still a young man, in 1890, Mr. Meyer was elected to the office of supervisor, an office which he held two years, and in 1895 was elected chairman of the board of supervisors, a capacity in which he acted for six years. He is a Democrat in politics, but it has been a case of the office seeking the man, rather than the man seeking the office. With his wife he attends St. John's German Lutheran Church .

OTTO KOEPKE, who has spent many years in Outagamie county engaged in agricultural pursuits, is now farming a property in Center township. He is a son of Ferdinand and Wilhelmina Koepke, natives of Germany, the former of whom served in the army of the Emperor Frederick William during the Franco-Prussian War. Mr. and Mrs. Koepke, with their two sons, Charles and Otto, started for the United States in 1872, but Charles died on the trip coming across the ocean, and the little party left New York for Milwaukee, where a short stop was made, then moving on to Dodge county. After another stop of a year, they came to Outagamie county, and settled in the woods of Cicero township, where the family resided for about fifteen years, and then the parents moved to Appleton. Mr. Koepke is now living in Oshkosh, his wife having died in 1904. They had a family of eight. children, of whom but four are now living .

Otto Koepke was twelve years of age when the family came to the United States, his birth having occurred March 17, 1860, and his education was secured in the schools of the Fatherland, and, to use his own words, "in the woods of Outagamie county, chopping wood." At the age of twenty-one years he was married to Mary Bergholtz, daughter of Charles and Sophia Bergholtz, and his father-in-law gave him forty acres of land due south from the family homestead. Here he built a little log house and took his young wife, this being their home for the ten years following, and he then rented his present property, operating it as a tenant for ten years, when he inherited it by will. He has brought it to a high state of cultivation and raises good crops, for which he finds a ready market. It is probable that Mr. Koepke will retire in a short time, feeling that his many years of hard labor entitle him to a rest in his fine home in Appleton, he having bought a residence there some time ago on Winnebago street. Mr. and Mrs. Koepke have had seven children as follows: Rosina, who died in infancy; Minnie, who married Gustave Shueller and has three daughters; Clara, who married Jacob Nolslegel, by whom she had two children; Mata, who married William Meyer and has one child, Milda; and Leo, Arthur and Malinda, all at home. Mr. and Mrs. Koepke are consistent members of the German Lutheran Church.

WILLIAM PINGEL, one of the progressive agriculturists of Center township, who has developed his farm into one of the best eighty acre tracts in his section of the county, was born June 23, 1868, in Greenville township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, the grandchild of John Charles and Dora (Zachow) Pingel, natives of Germany, who came to the United States when their son, William, was but two years old, settling in Greenville township. William Pingel was born in the '40s, and as a young man married Dora Dauck, but did not live long thereafter, his death occurring when he was but a young man, and his widow married Frederick Pingel, brother of her first husband, who is now living retired in Appleton, where Mrs. Pingel also makes her home. William Pingel was the only child of William and Dora (Dauck) Pingel, and was about three years of age when his mother and stepfather moved to Center township. He received all of his schooling in the district schools of this locality, and when he was old enough to manage it, his stepfather purchased a farm which William operated until 1895, at which time he purchased his present tract of eighty acres, then a partly improved farm, and little resembling the beautiful, highly-productive property of today. On October 19, 1892, Mr. Pingel was married to Ida Harm, daughter of John and Sophia Harm, of Center township, who were married in Germany. Mr. Pingel was born February 27, 1871, and went to the district schools of Center township. Mr. and Mrs. Pingel have had two children: Edna, born November 25, 1896; and Norma, born July 26, 1899.

Mr. Pingel has engaged quite extensively in dairying, and has made a number of improvements on his property along this line. His cow barns are fitted with cemented floors and partitions, and the utmost care is exercised to insure absolute cleanliness and hygienic conditions. He has also followed general farming and his efforts in this line have met with a well-deserved success, his large crops finding a ready and lucrative market. Mr. and Mrs. Pingel are consistent members of the German Lutheran Church.

FREDERICK A. MUELLER, a general farmer of Center township, who has been identified with the agricultural and educational affairs of this section of Outagamie county for a number of years, is a native of Wisconsin, having been born in the county of Milwaukee, November 15, 1868, a son of Christian F. Mueller. Christian F.Mueller was born February 13, 1824, in Germany, and came with his wife and one child, William V., to the United States in 1864. He went direct to Milwaukee, where for ten years he was engaged in working by the day, but in 1874 settled on a farm in Milwaukee county, and this he rented for a period of nineteen years. At the end of this time, in 1893, Mr. Mueller came to Center township, Outagamie county, and purchased the farm now owned by Frederick A. Mueller, at that time totally unimproved with the exception of a small log house. Mr. Mueller started in to improve his property, and soon erected a new house, and here he continued to reside until his death, in October, 1901, his wife having passed away before he came to this county. Three of the six children of Mr. and Mrs. Mueller are still living.

Frederick A. Mueller received his education in the schools of Milwaukee, and always worked for his father during the latters lifetime. After his death, he purchased the share of his brother, and he has continued to operate the place to the present time, erecting good substantial barns and making other improvements. He has found the pasture land very good on his tract, and feeds fine cattle for dairy products, also engaging in a general line of farming. On April 23, 1893, Mr. Mueller was married to Caroline Lillge, daughter of Otto and Freda Lillge, and granddaughter of one of the earliest settlers of Outagamie county. Mrs. Mueller was born January 5, 1886, in Center township, and received her education in the district schools of the neighborhood of the Lillge homestead. She and Mr. Mueller have become the parents of the following children: F. Herbert, who was born May 15, 1907, and died September 19, 1909, being buried at St. Peter's Church Cemetery; Henry George, born February 21, 1904; Gertrude Elfrida, born August 4, 1905; and F. Willard, born February 21, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Mueller belong to the German Lutheran Church. He is a Democrat in politics, and has been district school clerk for five years and road superintendent for six years.

HENRY C. LILLGE, who is operating the old home farm in Center township, is one of the progressive and enterprising young agriculturists of this section, and is a member of one of the oldest families in Outagamie county, where his grandfather, Charl Lillge, was a pioneer settler. Charl Lillge came to this country soon after his marriage in Germany, and settled in Center township, where he started in a humble way and at the time of his death was a prosperous and well-known farmer. His son, Otto, born in Center township, followed in his father's footsteps, and had become prosperous and influential, when he met an accidental death, November 26, 1895, by the bursting of a large grindstone. Otto Lillge married Freda Berg, and they had a family of five children, among whom was Henry C., born March 24, 1884, on the farm which he is now cultivating. He secured his education in the neighborhood schools, after leaving which he learned the carpenter trade and followed that occupation for five years, two years of which he was working for himself. In 1910 he took charge of the home farm, which is one of the best places of the neighborhood, being highly cultivated, and well improved with all the buildings and accessories which go to make up a model farm of the twentieth century.

In January, 1907, Mr. Lillge was united in marriage with Gusta Schubert, who was born August 3, 1883, in Black Creek township, Outagamie county, daughter of Charl and Gusta Schubert, prominent farming people of Black Creek township and natives of the Fatherland. Mr. and Mrs. Lillge have been the parents of three children, namely: Norman, who was born in November, 1907, and died at the age of nine months; Marvin, who was born in December, 1908 and died when thirteen months of age; and Wilbert, who was born June 30, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Lillge are consistent attendants of St. Peter's German Lutheran Church. He is a Republican in politics, but has not cared for public preferment, although he takes a keen interest in matters pertaining to the welfare of the community and may be counted on to give his ready and willing support to every enterprise of benefit to his township.

JOHN S. SCHROEDER, who during a period covering more than forty years has been a resident of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, has taken an important part in the growth and development of this section, and is now engaged in agricultural pursuits on a fine tract of 160 acres located on section 29, in Black Creek township. John S. Schroeder was born in Mecklenburg Schwerin, Germany, March 14, 1843, a son of John and Louisa (Olmss) Schroeder, who were married in Germany and came to the United States in 1855, settling in New York State, where they lived for fourteen years. In 1869 the family came to Wisconsin, settling in Center township, where the mother died ten years later, at the age of fifty-five years. Mr. Schroeder died in Black Creek township at the age of seventy-seven years. Both are buried in Center township. John Schroeder, who died July 18, 1894, was a farmer by occupation, following agricultural pursuits all of his life, and he was honored and esteemed by the early settlers of this county and by those of the generation that came afterward. He had five children, and of these John S.was the second in order of birth.

John S. Schroeder secured his education in Germany and in the district schools of the early days in this country, and he remained at home with his parents until his marriage, in 1869, to Miss Mary Fiestedt, daughter of Daniel and Dorothy Fiestedt, natives of Mecklenburg Schwerin, Germany, where the father died. In 1868 Mrs. Schroeder came with her mother and brother to America and they settled in Outagamie county. Her mother died in 1873 in the town of Center. Mrs. Schroeder was the next to the youngest of her parents' four children, and was born August 22, 1839, and died December 27, 1904. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Schroeder, namely: Albert W., born September 5, 1868, married Edith B. Boller and is engaged in the retail drug business in Chicago, Illinois; August H., born January 13, 1870, married Freida Nickalous, who died February 13, 1907, leaving one son named Roland; Anna, who married Charles Emrich, of Black Creek township, has two children; and Edwin, who married Delia Myers, living with John S. Schroeder, has one child named Lawrence.

After his marriage Mr. Schroeder bought eighty acres of land in section 17, Center township, and lived there untiI 1892, at which time his father made his home with him, and he then sold out and bought the property on which he now lives, a tract of 160 acres, of which 110 acres were at that time subject to the plow. He now has 140 acres in a high state of cultivation, and the place has been ideally improved, being now fenced with rail and barbed wire, and equipped with a complete number of barns and outhouses. The dwelling on the property had been built when Mr. Schroeder secured the place, but he has erected the other buildings, including a basement barn, 150x46 feet. He engages in general farmnig, markets barley and dairy products principally, and also raises fine Poland China hogs and mixed Short Horn and Holstein cattle.In political matters he is a Republican, and he served for four years as supervisor in Center township and six years as treasurer of the school board in Black Creek township. Mr. Schroeder attends the Black Creek Lutheran Church.

BENJAMIN J. HARTSWORM, a popular hotel proprietor of Black Creek township, living at Binghamton, and the owner of seven and one-half acres of valuable property on section 32, is a native of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, having been born here on December 22, 1873, a son of Paul and Mary Hartsworm. Mr. Hartsworm's parents are natives of Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, and are now living in Black Creek township, the father having reached the age of sixty-seven years and the mother being sixty-four years old. They had a family of eight children, of whom Benjamin J. is the sixth in order of birth.

Benjamin J. Hartsworm secured his education in the district schools of Outagamie county, and grew up on his father's farm, making the old family home his residence until he was twenty-five years old, prior to which time he was engaged in various occupations throughout Black Creek township. In April, 1898, he decided to enter the hotel business, and subsequently purchased the hotel property at Binghamton, where he now has an excellent patronage. Mr. Hartsworm is an ideal host, with a pleasing and hospitable personality, and this, with the excellent service furnished by the hotel, has made his house one of the best patronized hostelries in this section of Black Creek township. On September 30, 1902, Mr. Hartsworm was united in marriage with Miss Antonia Werhman, daughter of Simon and Fredericka Werhman, natives of Wisconsin, who are now living in Appleton, the father being fifty-seven years old and the mother fifty-three. Mrs. Hartsworm, who is the fourth in order of birth of her parents' twelve children, was born January 7, 1884. Five children have been born to Benjamin J. and Antonia Hartsworm, namely: Delas, Ruth, Esther, Ethel and Dayton. Mr. Hartsworm is a Republican in politics, and he and Mrs. Hartsworm are consistent members of the Lutheran Church.

NOACK BROTHERS. Ernest and William Noack, who are carrying on farming operations on a well-cultivated tract of land on section 8, in the town of Seymour, are sons of August and Anna Noack, who are now living in the town of Maple Grove, on section 13, Shawano county, on a 100-acre farm, where they moved at the time the boys took charge of the Seymour township farm in October, 1910. August Noack was an early settler of Seymour township, locating at an early day on forty acres of wild land on which was an old sheep shed, the first family home. After building up this place and cultivating the land Mr. Noack sold the property and moved to the farm which the boys are now operating, originally an eighty-acre tract and now consisting of 120 acres. The buildings are substantial, spacious and well located and the farm presents an appearance that does credit to its owners. August and Anna Noack were the parents of the following children: Ernest, born December 25, 1886; William, born January 13, 1888; Emma, who lives wth her brothers and manages the household; Otto; and Alma, the last two named being at Maple Grove, Wisconsin.

AUGUST ROTHLESBERGER, one of the progressive, up-to-date farmers of Seymour township, who has made his own way in the world and made a place for himself among the successful men of his section through hard work and a determination to succeed, was born October 25, 1856, at Port Washington, Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, a son of John and Matilda (Wachter) Rothlesberger, natives of Germany. The parents of Mr. Rothlesberger were farming people and their first property was located at Fredonia, where they resided seven years, then moving to Batavia. They continued to reside at this place until locating in Seymour township, settling on 120 acres of wild land, where they continued to live during the remainder of their lives. Mr. Rothlesberger's death occurred in 1898, when he was sixty-nine years old, and the mother passed away in 1904. They had the following children: August, George, William, Barney, Minnie, Lydia and Allie.

August Rothlesberger was the oldest of his parents' children, and as soon as he was able to reach the plow handles he was given his share of duties to perform on the home farm. He was reared to the life of an agriculturist and experienced all of the hard, unremitting toil of breaking in a new country, and no time was given him to acquire an education. Much observation, however, has given him a store of knowledge not to be gained in books, and he has never found that the lack of schooling interfered in any way with his ambition to succeed. When he purchased the old homestead it was graced with a little shanty and a log barn, but he soon added eighty acres to the original forty, built a fine house and a barn 40x100 feet, and settled down to general farming. Mr. Rothlesberger has one of the finest herds of Holstein cattle to be found in Outagamie county, and he makes on an average of 145 pounds of butter each week. His barn is equipped with all modern improvements as to sanitary needs and cleanliness, and includes the James patent stalls and stanchions.

In 1890 Mr. Rothlesberger was married to Josie Schimmelpfennig, daughter of August and Minnie Schimmelpfennig, and three children have been born to this union, namely: Ella, August and Hulda.

ADELBERT B. CARTER. One of the well-cultivated, highly productive farms of Seymour township is that owned by Adelbert B. Carter, located on section 18, where Mr. Carter has carried on operations since 1889. He is a native of Dodge county, Wisconsin, where he was born November 30, 1863, a son of Arnold and Jane Celestine (Wilson) Carter, natives of Jefferson county, New York. The parents of Mr. Carter were married in their native county, after which they emigrated to Dodge county, Wisconsin, and for three or four years were engaged in farming there, then removing to the State of Missouri. During the Civil War the family returned to Wisconsin, and Mr. Carter enlisted in Company 1, First Wisconsin Heavy Artillery, and after his service was completed he returned to the farm which he had purchased previous to enlistment in Osborne township, Outagamie county. There he erected a log cabin and stable and continued to carry on farming operations until his death.

Adelbert B. Carter was reared on the home farm, and secured his educational training in the district schools of his native locality, and after attaining his majority began working for himself. He was employed by his father until he reached the age of twenty-six, when he was married. He rented his father's farm for two years, after which he bought his present property, then consisting of sixty acres. There was a small log house on the place and eight or ten acres cleared. He used the log house for a barn the first year. He bought a frame house of one part and moved it a mile. He got out timber during the winter for a frame barn. He began clearing land and later added twenty acres to the original purchase, and the whole property is now in a fine state of cultivation. He has built on to his house until it now has eleven rooms. His first barn, which was 36x60 feet, and which was destroyed by fire, has been replaced by a fine structure 36x70 feet. Mr. Carter raises thoroughbred cattle, and is noted for the large and fancy broods of Plymouth Rock chickens which his incubators produce. A clean-cut, reliable and honest farmer, he not only has a large number of warm personal friends, but he is esteemed and respected by a wide circle of acquaintances.

In 1887 Mr. Carter was married to Carrie J. Tubbs, daughter of Peter Tubbs, of the Seymour Advisory Board, and they have had the following children: Edith, born November 7, 1888; Mildred, August 6, 1891; Clyde, October 1, 1894; Marion, August 25, 1897: Dorothy, August 14, 1899; Ellen, July 24, 1901; Ruth, April 6, 1902: and Robert, February 17, 1905.

AUGUST KARWEICK, who has been a lifelong resident of Seymour township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, was born in this township, October 12, 1877, and is a son of William and Johanna (Korsch) Karweick, and a grandson of Martin and Anna Karweick, farming people of Germany. The grandparents of Mr. Karweick had sevenl children, namely: William, Minnie, Gusta, August, Albert, Johanna and Herman. William Karweick was born in Germany, December 9, 1843, and came to the United States in 1869, locating at Appleton, Wisconsin, from whence he removed in 1876 to Seymour township. He took up eighty acres of land in section 20, and during the years that followed the wild and timbered land gave way to smooth, cultivated fields, producing large crops, and the little log buildings of the pioneer days became modern structures of substantial build, where Mr. and Mrs. Karweick are passing their declining years. Johanna Korsch was born in Germany, October 2, 1845, the seventh child of a family of eight, of whom the others were: John, Caroline, Henrietta., Mary, Tina, Henry and Charles. Mr. and Mrs. Karweick had only three children: Herman, who is now deceased; August; and Lena, who married Otto Jaeger.

August Karweick received his education in the district schools of Seymour township and remained on the home farm assisting his father until his marriage in 1899 to Emma Court. For two years thereafter Mr. and Mrs. Karweick resided on the old family homestead, and in 1901 Mr. Karweick purchased the farm across the road from his father's place, a tract of eighty acres in section 19, partly improved. Here he erected a fine, twelve-room house, a barn 38x70 feet, good outbuildings and a steel tower windmill. and he has been engaged in general farming and stock raising to the present time. Mrs. Karweick was born February 11, 1877, in Cicero township, daughter of Charles and Minnie (Baker) Court. Charles Court was born March 25, 1844, in Germany, and was one of the early settlers in Outagamie county, coming to Greenville during the pioneer days and working for the farmers in this vicinity in order to get a start. Eventually he located on 160 acres of wild land in Cicero township and began life in a log cabin 26x20 feet, with one cow and a yoke of oxen as his livestock. By 1882 he had erected a barn 36x50 feet and in 1889 erected another 30x50 feet, and during 1890 a fine nine-room house was built. In 1874 Mr. Court was married to Minnie Baker, who was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, October 28, 1847, daughter of Christoph and Marie (Layman) Baker, who came to this country with their two children, Minnie and Caroline, and spent their declining years with Mr. and Mrs. Court, the father dying in 1905 at the remarkable age of ninety-eight years and the mother in 1901 when eighty-four years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Court had the following children: Augusta, Emma, Albert, Bertha, Ida, Herman, Charles and Richard.

To Mr. and Mrs. Karweick there have been born two children: Gertrude, born January 7, 1905; and Harold, December 14, 1910. The family is connected with the Lutheran Church.

JACOB NICKOLAY, whose fine tract of 198 acres, Woodside Farm, is situated in section 13, Seymour township, is a native of Germany, born November 4, 1853, a son of Peter and Susan Nickolay. The parents of Mr. Nickolay were married in Germany and came to the United States in 1867 with their five children, Jacob, Mary, Peter, Anton and John, settling on forty acres of land in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, ten acres of which had been cleared. Mr. Nickolay, with the help of his sons, cleared the remainder of this property, and lived there twenty years, and his last years were spent at the home of his son Jacob, where he died in 1909, aged eighty-five years, the mother having passed away February 22, 1892, the day before her sixty-seventh birthday. Jacob Nickolay received his education in Germany, and was fourteen years old when the family came to the United States. During the year following their arrival, he remained at home, and he then went to work in the shingle mills until he was twenty-four, when he commenced farming, and in 1879 came to Seymour township, locating on a tract of sixty-seven acres. This land was virgin wilderness, not a stick having been cut on the property, but after he had erected a little log house and barn Mr. Nickolay began the work of clearing his property for cultivation, and after putting the original purchase in a productive state he bought thirteen acres adjoining, and he now has most of his land under cultivation. He built a fine brick house and a barn 84x70 feet, the latter of which was destroyed by fire, and he then erected a new barn, 36x106 feet, with a basement under all. He raises thoroughbred hogs of the Duroc Jersey breed, Holstein cattle and fine horses, and carries on extensive general farming operations. In politics Mr. Nickolay is a staunch Democrat and he has served Sevmour township as supervisor and as assessor for nine years.

In 1879 Mr. Nickolay was married to Mary Bur, who was born in Germany in 1854, daughter of Nick and Catherine Bur, natives of Germany, who came to the United States and died at Green Bay, Wisconsin. Mr. and Mrs. Nickolay have no children, but have an adopted son, Raphael, who was born in 1891 in New York.

WOLF R. SIGL, proprietor of Oakland Farm, a well-cultivated tract of 120 acres of farming land lying in section 2, Seymour township, was born October 30, 1869, in Bavaria, Germany, and is a son of Sebastian Sigl, whose other children were George, Max, Teckla, Joe, John and Frank. Mr. Sigl cannot remember his mother, as she died when he was only four years old. Sebastian Sigl married again after his first wife's death, and the family came to the United States in 1876, stopping at Appleton, Wisconsin, two months and then moving on to Seymour township, two miles west of the present site of Oakland Farm. They located on ninety acres of wild land, on which Mr. Sigl erected a log house and barn, but a short time later moved across the line into Shawano county, where Mr. Sigl purchased 120 acres of wild land and again started in a log house. With the help of his sons he cleared the land from the wilderness, and erected good frame buildings, and at the time of his death, in 1890, when he was sixty-two years old, he was one of the substantial farmers of his community. By his second marriage he became the father of Wesley L., Charles A., Henry W., Edelia and Mary.

Wolf R. Sigl was seven years old when the family came to the United States, and his education was secured in the district schools. He grew up on the home farm, his boyhood being spent much the same as that of other farmers' sons at that time, and he was reared to the hard work of the uncultivated farm. When twenty-three years of age he started out for himself in the lumber mills, but in 1895 purchased forty acres of his present land, which was then in a totally uncultivated state. By hard work he managed to clear the land for cultivation, and when this had been accomplished he added another forty acres, and some time later forty acres more, and all this land has been cultivated to a highly productive state. He has a handsome farm residence, a 40x82 barn, with basement, and other good farm buildings, and here he carries on general farming and stock raising. Mr. Sigl has been uniformly successful in his operations and he is considered one of the good, practical agriculturists of Seymour township.

In 1895 Mr. Sigl was married to Mamie Meyers, who was born in Menominee, Michigan, in 1879, daughter of John Meyers. Mr. and Mrs. Sigl have had no children.

HENRY ALBERT. Among the representative citizens and good, practical farmers of Seymour township, Outagamie county, may be mentioned Henry Albert, whose well-cultivated farm of eighty acres is located on section 11. He is a native of Wisconsin, having been born in Dodge county, March 23, 1862, and is a son of August and Louisa (Baker) Albert. August Albert was a native of Germany, from whence, he came to the United States with his parents, who settled in Dodge county, Wisconsin. There Mr. Albert grew to manhood and engaged in farming all of his life, dying in 1905 at the age of seventy-three years, a substantial and highly respected citizen. His widow, who survives him, makes her home at Horicon, and has reached the age of seventy-three years. They had the following eight children: Henry, Louis, William, Mary, Emma, Minnie, Caroline, and one who. died in infancy.

Henry Albert received his education in the district schools of Dodge county, and grew up on the home farm, being reared to the life of an agriculturist from the time when he could first reach the plow-handles. He engaged in farming on his own account when he had attained his majority, and continued to farm in Dodge county until his marriage to Susan Zeiman, in 1888, when he came to Seymour township and settled on a farm which was located two miles south of the property on which he is now operating. He came to the latter place four years later, at a time when it was nearly all wild land, but he now has the entire place under cultivation and has one of the best-appearing and most productive properties in his part of the township. Mr. Albert has always taken a great interest in the cause of education, and is now serving as a director of school district No. 8. Mrs. Albert, who is a native of Hustisford, Wisconsin, was born November 6, 1868, a daughter of Henry Zeiman, an early settler of that locality. When she was two years old her parents removed to Racine county. The death of her mother left an infant brother to her care. Some years later Mr. Zeiman moved to Horicon, which has since been his home. He is now sixty-four years old and vividly recollects the hardships of pioneer times endured by his people. Mrs. Zeiman was born at Hartford, her maiden name being Christina Schultz, a daughter of Martin Schultz, who was related to the Alberts, pioneers of Milwaukee and at Hartford. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Albert, namely: Adaline, who married Myrle Little; and Cora, Clara and Harvey.

OTTO EISCH, who conducts a store and tavern in the little community of Isaar, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, was for a number of years engaged in farming in Seymour township, and is well and favorably known to the citizens of this section. Mr. Eisch was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 30, 1870, and at the age of sixteen years came to America and located in Seymour township, where he worked on a farm for ten years. He was here married to Anna Schmidt, who was born December 20, 1878, daughter of Peter Schmidt, a pioneer of Seymour township, and the young couple settled on eighty acres of wild land, on which was a frame dwelling, 18x24 feet, and a log barn. Later, Mr. Eisch sold this property and moved to another tract of eighty acres, on section 2, in the same township, and after cultivating this land for a few years purchased forty acres more and erected a fine basement and barn. Seven or eight years later Mr. and Mrs. Eisch located on their present large property, which is located in Seymour township, on section 11, and Mr. Eisch now conducts a general store and tavern, which he purchased in 1908. Mr. Eisch has held the office of treasurer of school district No. 6, of which he has been a director for some years, and he also took a prominent part in the building of the Catholic Church at Isaar, of which he is a leading member. He and his wife were the second couple to be married in this church. They have been the parents of eight children, as follows: Elizabeth, Otto, John, Ferdinand, Margaret, Robert, Henry and Eleanora, of whom Otto is now deceased.

HARRY K. PRATT, D. D. S., a well known member of the Outagamie dental profession, whose chosen field of practice is the city of Appleton, is a native of this city, born August 6, 1878, a son of Edgar M. and Henriette (Meitzner) Pratt, and a grandson of Miles Pratt. Miles Pratt, who was a blacksmith by trade, brought his family to Wisconsin from New York State in 1855, and located in Rock county, having a shop at Milton, from whence he came to Appleton in 1868. He was married in New York to Deborah Cooley, and among their children was Edgar M. Pratt, who was born at Alden, New York, in 1854, accompanied the family to Wisconsin, was a traveling salesman for many years, and is now engaged in the newspaper and tobacco business in Milwaukee. He and his wife, who was born in Germany, are still living, as are three of their six children: Alice and Mabel, who are teachers in the Milwaukee schools; and Harry K. Harry K. Pratt attended the public and high schools in Appleton, after leaving which he entered the Wisconsin College of Dental Surgery, and was graduated therefrom with the degree of D. D. S., in 1902. He immediately located in Appleton, where for about six months he was associated with Dr. Crawford, whose practice he eventually purchased, and since that time has been engaged in his profession alone. He is well known in his profession. has a large number of friends and acquaintances, and is popular in fraternal circles, belonging to the Knights of Pythias, of which he is past chancellor, the Odd Fellows, the Elks, and the Masonic fraternity. With his wife he attends the Presbyterian Church in Appleton, and his political principles are those of the Republican party. In 1904 Dr. Pratt was married to Elsie Sebold, of Plymouth, Wisconsin, and they have had two daughters, namely: Katherine and Henrietta.

LUTHER H. MOORE, D. D. S., practicing dentistry in the city of Appleton, Wisconsin, is one of the well known professional men of Outagamie county, where he has confined his efforts since 1907. Dr. Moore is a native of Clinton county, Ohio, born June 8, 1869, a son of Oliver and Ophelia (Coate) Moore, residents of Kansas City, Missouri. Luther H. Moore has one sister, Anna, who resides in Kansas City, Missouri, married to Dr. George C. Thompson. Dr. Moore secured his preliminary education in the public schools of Clinton county, Ohio, and he was fourteen years of age when he accompanied his parents to Kansas. He completed his public school education there, and some years later decided upon the dental profession for his life work and subsequently entered the Western Dental College, of Kansas City, Missouri, from which he received his degree in 1905. During the two years that followed, he, was situated at Baxter Springs, Kansas, and in 1907 he came to Appleton, where he has since followed his profession with satisfactory success. Dr. Moore was married in 1906, to Miss Mary Olmstead, daughter of Lamar Olmstead, of Appleton, and they have had one daughter, Ellen. Mrs. Moore, who is a very talented lady, was a teacher of music in Baxter Springs College prior to her marriage. Dr. Moore is a member of the Blue Lodge and Chapter of the Masonic fraternity, and his politics are those of the Republican party.

STILLMAN N. FISH, a successful business man of Appleton, Wisconsin, handling a full line of staple and fancy groceries at his modern establishment situated at No. 1011 College avenue, was born in the State of Connecticut, March 24, 1850, and is a son of Elisha and Sallie (Dais) Fish, natives of Connecticut of English descent, whose ancestors came to this country during Colonial days. Mr. Fish's father, grandfather and six uncles were all soldiers in the Union army during the Civil War, belonging to the Eighteenth, Twenty-sixth and Twenty-first Connecticut regiments. Elisha Fish, who was a blacksmith by trade, followed that occupation throughout his life, and with the exception of the time during which he served in the Civil War never left his native state. Stillman N. Fish received his educational training in the public schools of Conneeticut, and in March, 1885, came to Wisconsin and located in Appleton, where he secured employment in the Kimberly-Clark Paper Mill. He had been associated with Mr. P. R. Thom for some time before coming to Appleton, and it was on the latter's suggestion that he settled in this section. He continued to be employed by this gentleman for fourteen years, and in 1901 embarked in the grocery business on Cherry street, this being his location until January, 1910, when increased business demanded more space and better facilities, and Mr. Fish accordingly moved to his present situation, 1011 College avenue. Here he has a building fitted in every way to meet the demands and satisfy the requirements of a large trade, and he carries a full line of the best grade of groceries. His business ability, strict attention to his affairs, and hard, untiring labor have made him successful in his chosen line, and he is considered one of the substantial men of his community. In 1869 Mr. Fish was married to Lula James, of Connecticut, who died in Appleton in 1886, and during the year following he was married to Tilda Nichols, of Appleton, who survives. Mr. Fish had a family of six children by his first marriage, as follows: Jessie, who married Orrice Nichols, of Appleton; Clark, a papermaker of Appleton; Bertha, who married Chris Casperson, a resident of Neenah; Stillman, a papermaker of Kansas City; Winfield J. ,engaged in papermaking in Ohio; and William, who is in business with his father. Mr. and Mrs. Fish are connected with the Congregational Church. Fraternally he is connected with the Elks.

ALBERT DAHMS, who is numbered among the leading business men and representative citizens of Appleton, Wisconsin, is the proprietor of a leading grocery store of the city. He was born in Germany, January 17, 1866, and came to the United States in 1884 with his parents, Fred and Augusta Dahms, who located in Dodge county, where Mr. Dahms engaged in farming. Albert Dahms received his early education in the schools of his native country, and later was given an English education in Dodge county. After leaving school he began to get his business training in a grocery store at Neenah, where he opened an establishment of his own in 1897, but decided to widen his field of operations in July, 1910, at which time he came to Appleton and bought out W. L. Rhodes' grocery, which he remodeled and improved in numerous ways. He now has a leading grocery in Appleton, with a store 25x140 feet, and caters to the best trade in Appleton. In 1889 Mr. Dahms was united in marriage with Ernestine Nehne, and they have had four children, namely: Elsie, Olga, Meta and Dorothy. Mr. Dahms is a consistent member of the German Lutheran Church, and is serving as trustee of the Lutheran Aid Association. In political matters he is independent, relying on his own judgment to tell him which candidate is best fitted for the office. His business is steadily growing, owing to Mr. Dahms' excellent methods of handling his affairs, and he is rapidly taking his place among the prominent business men of his adopted city.

PATRICK H. RYAN, a prosperous business citizen of Appleton, Wisconsin, where he is engaged in plumbing with T. J. Long as a partner, is a native of this city, where he was born August 27, 1864, and a son of John and Margaret (Grace) Ryan, natives of Ireland. The parents of Mr. Ryan were married in their native country, and in 1852 left the Emerald Isle for the United States, in that year landing at Northampton, Massachusetts. Two years later they came to Appleton, the trip being made in the winter and the family suffering much from the cold, as a great deal of the journey was made by stage coach between the railroad points, the lakes being closed. On first locating in Appleton, John Ryan settled in the Third Ward, where he first worked as a day laborer, and later took up railroad contracting and farming. He died here in 1903, and his wife in 1906, both being members of St. Mary's Catholic Church, of which they were among the earliest members. Eight children were born to John and Margaret Ryan, as follows: Lawrence, who died at the age of nineteen years; Ellen, who married Edward Murphy and resides in Appleton; James, who died when thirteen years of age; Richard, formerly engaged, in the grocery business in Appleton, and now connected with the International Harvester Company in Milwaukee; Kate, who married John Hawley and now resides at Neenah; John C., born in Appleton, May 9, 1861, the owner of an art store in Appleton, who married Helene Murphy; Margaret, who married Richard Dunn, a resident of Neenah; and Patrick H. Patrick H. Ryan received a high school education, graduating from the Appleton High School in 1882, after which he began driving a team for the C. C. Wayland Lumber Company. After two years of this kind of work, he was given charge of the yards for this company, a position in which he continued for four years. He then spent one year at DePere, and the next three and one-half years he spent as Deputy under Sheriffs James Golden and Richard Conlon. He then went to Bessemer, Michigan, and for a time was employed by the lumber firm of Hoxey & Mellor, and in 1891 came to Appleton and engaged in the plumbing business with Harry Nichols, to whom he sold his interest in 1898 and engaged in the same line with T. J. Long, with whom he has since been associated. These partners have built up an excellent trade in Appleton, both being experts in their line of work. In 1897 Mr. Ryan was married to Josephine Malone, of Appleton, daughter of James Malone. Mr. and Mrs. Ryan are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church, and Mr. Ryan is a charter member of the Knights of Columbus.

MARTIN McDERMOTT. Almong the prominent farmers and representative citizens of Hortonia township, Outagamie county, may be mentioned Martin McDermott, the owner of a fine farming property, which was originally the home of his father, John McDermott. John McDermott, who was born in Ireland, came to the United States at the age of seventeen years, and from 1847 until 1865 lived in New York City. He was married in that city to Katherine Saul, also a native of Ireland, who was left an orphan and came to the United States when ten years old. In 1862 John McDermott enlisted for service in the Civil War, becoming a member of the Fourth New York Heavy Artillery, with which he served until the close of hostilities, when he received an honorable discharge. He was seriously wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, and he never really fully recovered from the effects thereof. At the close of the war he came to Wisconsin, whence his wife and three children, George, Thomas and Michael (seven children having died in New York) had preceded him the spring previous, and when he located here he purchased the property that is now owned by Martin McDermott. This land was then covered with heavy timber, but after John McDermott had erected a little log shanty, he and his sons started to clear the property for cultivation. For eight years the family lived in the first little home, and Mr. McDermott then built a larger house, in which he died in 1901, aged seventy-two years, his wife following him to the grave in 1907. Martin McDermott's educational advantages were somewhat limited, as his help was needed on the farm during the summer months, and in the winters he worked in the logging camps, but he managed withal to gain a fairly good education, which has been supplemented by reading and close observation in after years. In 1882 he was married to Mary Cavanaugh, a native of Ohio, daughter of Michael and Bridget (McNicholas) Cavanaugh, who came from Ireland and settled in Ohio, from whence they came in 1858 to Wisconsin, settling in Hortonia township. Here Michael Cavanaugh took up land, and at the time of his death, June 3, 1911, he was one of the prominent citizens of his section. His wife died June 18, 1887, having been the mother of eight children. After his marriage Mr. McDermott came to live on his present property, where, by hard work and good management, he has added considerably to his acreage. Mr. McDermott's home is large and commodious, and the barns are modern and ample, all of these having been built by him, and the fine, prosperous appearance of the property testifies to its good management. Mr. and Mrs. McDermott have had six children: John Edward and two infants, deceased; Mary Ethel, born June 16, 1885, the wife of William Furman, of Winchester; Nellie Alicia, born August 9, 1889; and Martin Elias, born May 17, 1897. The family is connected with the Catholic Church at New London.

AUGUST KRAHN, a prosperous farmer and stockraiser of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who resides in Section 9, Osborn township, owns two valuable farms, one containing 200 acres and the second one, situated farther south, containing 240 acres. He was born in Germany, December 3, 1853, and is a son of Gottlieb and Amelia Krahn. His mother died in her native land, after which the father and his children came to the United States. The large percentage of German settlers in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, attracted him to that place, where, after a season, he again married. August Krahn remained at home and worked in Milwaukee until 1881, and by that time had acquired enough capital to enable him to invest in two tracts of eighty acres each, in Section 9, Osborn township, Outagamie county. This land that now shows every evidence of careful cultivation, was then covered with woods and brush, a part of it being also swamp, while the only improvements were a little frame building used for a dwelling house and a small barn. Mr. Krahn had always been industrious and the appearance of the place in no wise discouraged him, and he immediately set about clearing it, having a yoke of oxen, a little wagon and two cows at that time. To know how well he succeeded, and in a comparatively short time, the visitor has only to look over his productive fields, note his orchards and his fine grade of stock. In place of the little frame dwelling there stands a fine modern residence, and his basement barn has measurements of 40x90 feet.

Mr. Krahn was married first to Lena Becker, who died in 1881, at the age of twenty-two years. She was the mother of three children: Charles, Clara and a babe that died. He was married secondly to Albertina Greinke, and they have four sons and four daughters: William, Fred, Albert, Eduard, Bertha, Anna, Meta and Louisa.

JAMES WOODS, who is now engaged in operating a magnificent farming property of 280 acres located in Greenville township, is one of Outagamie county's substantial agriculturists. He was born on the farm which he now owns, and is a son of Michael and Ellen (Cunneen) Woods, natives of County Limerick, Ireland. Michael Woods was born March 10, 1817, a son of Michael Woods, and his educational advantages were somewhat limited in his youth on account of sudden reverses in the family fortunes. His assistance was needed in supporting the family, and as a youth and young man he worked as a farm hand, also engaging in boating on the river Shannon. In 1846 he came to the United States, and after a short experience as a dock hand in New York City, he made his way West to Milwaukee. During 1855 he returned to New York City, and on October 4 of that year he was married to Ellen Cunneen. They then started back to Wisconsin, and on November 12 settled on a tract of wild land in the southwest quarter of Section 12, which Mr. Woods had purchased some time previously, and this he cultivated and improved, adding to it year by year until at the time of his death he was the owner of 425 acres of fine land. Farming was Mr. Woods' life work, and he never allowed other matters to divert his attention from it. Having started as a poor youth, he always appreciated the value of money, but, likewise, having felt the pinch of poverty, he never hesitated to help out those less fortunate than he. A good farmer, a public-spirited citizen, and a self-made man, Mr. Woods had the respect of his fellow townsmen, and his death was a loss to the community in which he resided. His first wife died August 16, 1864, leaving four children: John, who died March 15, 1911; Michael, also deceased, whose family are residing in Grand Chute township; Joanna, who died at the age of two years; and James. Michael Woods was married (second) to Kate Leahey, of County Cork, Ireland, and died April 12, 1892, being buried in Greenville cemetery.

James Woods has always been a resident of the old homestead farm, his education having been received in the schools of its vicinity, and since he was old enough to assume responsibility, he has been concerned in its management. He was in partnership with his brother John, after his father's death, and since John's death he has had entire control of the property, which now aggregates 280 acres. The railroad runs through this property. Although he hires help to assist him in working his large farm, Mr. Woods has not found time from his duties to interest himself actively in other matters, and as a consequence is not connected with any fraternal organization, nor is he engaged in politics. His religious connections are with St. Mary's Church, at Appleton. On April 25, 1911, Mr. Woods was married to Katherine Halloran, who was born in Ellington township, Outagamie county, daughter of Michael and Julia (Newcomb) Halloran, natives of County Cork, Ireland, and early settlers of Ellington township, where they spent the rest of their lives in farming. They were the parents of six children, all of whom are living, and of whom Mrs. Woods is the youngest.

HENRY L. HOH, who has been a life-long resident of Greenville township, where he now operates a farm of 160 acres, was born on the property he now owns, October 9, 1869, and is a son of Henry R. and Bertha (Eberhardt) Hoh, natives of Schwartzburg, Sanders Haufen, Saxony, where the former was born October 2, 1835, and the latter April 2, 1842. Henry R. Hoh came to America when nine years of age with his parents, the family coming direct to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where they resided for a number of years, then coming to Outagamie county and locating in Grand Chute township. Mrs. Hoh came to America, when one year old, and with her parents also located in Milwaukee. Mr. Hoh resided with his parents until he had reached man's estate, at which time he began working for others, following the trade of cooper until 1861, when he married and moved to Grand Chute township and engaged in the cooperage business. He remained here until 1892, in which year he retired and moved to Appleton, where his death occurred in December, 1903. His widow, who survives him, still makes her home in Appleton. They had a family of five children, as follows: Lovina, the wife of Otto Younger, a grocer of Appleton; Clara, who married Charles Menning, engaged in farming in Greenville township; Henry L.; Sarah, the wife of Charles Meltz, of Menasha township; and Levi, residing on Second avenue, Appleton, within the city limits in Grand Chute township. Henry L. Hoh attended the Greenville township schools and also spent one year in the old Ryan High School, Appleton. He was married January 12, 1892, to Anna Woltersdorf, born in Columbus, Wisconsin, December 13, 1867, daughter of William and Bertha (Briese) Woltersdorf, natives of Germany, who came to America in 1867 and located at Columbus, where Mr. Woltersdorf died about 1888, his widow residing there until 1909, when she went to live with Mr. and Mrs. Hoh. Mr. Hoh has never left the old homestead farm. He assisted his father in clearing the land and in cultivating it, and at the time of his marriage he began renting it and working it on his own account. When his father died he bought the interest of the other heirs, and he now works 160 acres, engaging in farming along general lines, and in stock raising. He has also a tract of twenty acres of timber land in Grand Chute township. Mr. Hoh's farm is one of the best equipped properties in Greenville township, his buildings being large and substantial, including a barn, 36x117 feet. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in political matters is independent, never aspiring to office. Mr. and Mrs. Hoh have four children, namely: Lorena, Ruth, Alfred and Clarence, all single and at home.

WILLIAM 0. CLARK, who is well known in the feed and grain business in Appleton, as a member of the firm of Comerford & Clark, was born in Hartford, Wisconsin, July 11, 1849, and is a son of Ozias and Lydia (Graves) Clark, natives of New York, who came to Waukesha county at an early day, and later moved to Hartford. Ozias Clark purchased Government land, which he operated until 1863, and in that year came to Appleton, removing later to Clayton, and two years thereafter to Chilton, Calumet county, where both parents died. They had a family of four children, of whom, one is now deceased. William O. Clark was educated partly in the public schools and partly in the school of hard work, his early youth being spent in the lumber woods, and at the age of twenty-nine years he came to Appleton, where he was engaged in the hay and pressing business. His first association with William Comerford, his present partner, was in the livery business, in which they continued for one year, and in 1893 the firm of Comerford & Clark was formed for the selling of hay and feed. The business has prospered from the start, and the concern has a high reputation in the grain and feed trade. In 1877 Mr. Clark was united in marriage with Ellen Carr, who died in 1890, leaving three children: Charles Louis, who resides at Ashland, Wisconsin; Eva Maude, a teacher at Medina, Wisconsin, who will be principal of the Dale School in 1912; and Elmer William, who is engaged in the mercantile business in Australia. Mr. Clark was married (second) in 1891, to Clara Cook, of Oshkosh, who was principal of the South Side School in that city, and to this union there was born one son: Ray, who died at the age of eight months. Mrs. Clark is a member of the Congregational Church. Her husband is fraternally connected with the Knights of Pythias, and has also been connected with public matters, serving as commissioner of the poor for three terms, and assisting in various movements for the benefit of Appleton. He is one of the conservative, responsible business men that add to the business strength of any community, while as a citizen he is public spirited in a large degree..

FRANK W. HAUERT, who was born in Brookfield, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, August 6, 1865, is one of Appleton's well-known business men, and is proprietor of the oldest grain and feed establishment in this city. He is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Reineman) Hauert, the former a native of Baden, Germany, and the latter of the same country, from whence she came with her parents. Jacob Hauert came to the United States as a young man and settled first in Milwaukee, from whence, in 1849, he traveled overland to California during the days of the discovery of gold. Having accumulated considerable means there, he returned by way of boat, and was married in Milwaukee, after which he purchased land in Waukesha county, where all of his children were born. Mr. Hauert started to come to Outagamie county about 1868, to loan money, and about 1874 he settled in Appleton and bought a half interest in the Charles Morey flour mill. Later Nicholas Weiland bought Mr. Morey's interest in the business, which still later became Wambolt, Hauert & Company, Incorporated, and eventually the Hauerts all sold their interest in the business and Jacob Hauert retired, living a quiet life until his death in 1905, at the age of eighty-four years, his widow surviving until January 22, 1909. Although not a member of any church Mr. Hauert was liberal in his contributions to church and charitable movements. He had a family of nine children, as follows: Henry, who is deceased, was manager of the flour mill and later with his brother, Jacob J., in the flour and feed business, and had a wife and one son, Robert; George, a retired farmer of Oshkosh, has a wife and two children; Jacob J., engaged in the hardware business in Appleton, is married and has five children; one child who died in infancy; Annie, who died at the age of 13 years; Julia, who married Henry Kossel, a resident of Oshkosh, engaged in the real estate business; Frank W., Appleton; Fred C., resident of Black Creek, Wisconsin, the proprietor of a general store, has a wife and two children; and Amelia, who married Henry Losselyong, a mail carrier of Appleton, has two children.

Frank W. Hauert received a common school education in the schools of Waukesha. county, and as a youth came to Appleton and went to work for his brothers, Henry and Jacob, who were engaged in the flour and feed business here. After the death of Henry Hauert, Frank W., on April 25, 1894, bought his brother's interest in the business, which he has since conducted alone with great success. The present store was erected by Mr. Hauert's father, in 1883, and is a two-story structure, 53x80 feet. Mr. Hauert is the leading flour, feed and seed merchant in Appleton, and his stand is the oldest in the city. On January 19, 1891, Mr. Hauert was united in marriage with Mary Bowhousen, and they have had four children.: May, who is deceased; and Helen, Ervin J, and Lorine, all at home. Mr. Hauert's fraternal connections are with the Woodmen and the Eagles.

RICHIE R. BLAKE, manager of the F. W. Woolworth Five and Ten-Cent Store, at Appleton, Wisconsin, and one of the progressive and enterprising young business men of this city, was born at Benton, Lafayette county, Wisconsin, September 13, 1880, and is a son of Stephen and Elizabeth Blake. Richie R. Blake received his education in the common schools of Lafayette county, and as a young man started to learn the trade of barber, although his father was a carpenter and contractor. Working as a journeyman, his trade carried him to various points in the country, and while working in Des Moines, Iowa, in February, 1906, he first became connected with the Woolworth stores. Later he was sent to the store at Freeport, Illinois, where he remained for a short time, and in February, 1908, he was sent to Appleton to take charge of the store here, which had been established and opened September 2, 1905. This establihment occupies floor space 40x90, the basement and back room being used as storerooms for the stock, and in addition to the manager eleven persons are employed. Nothing but goods costing five and ten cents are handled, and under Mr. Blake's efficient management the business has steadily grown. Mr. Blake was united in marriage, July 14, 1910, to Miss Mabel McGary, of Appleton, the estimable daughter of Benjamin McGary, a well known citizen of this place.

WILLIAM WENZEL, whose enterprising methods and progressive ideas have, stamped him as one of the up-to-date business men of Appleton, is engaged in plumbing, and in the manufacture of plumbing supplies and various articles of his own invention. He was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, January 31, 1854, and is a son of Anton and Agnes Wenzel, natives of Germany, who came to Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, in 1852, where Mr. Wenzel was engaged in farming all of his life. Two children were born to Anton and Agnes Wenzel, namely: William, and Mrs. Fred Lais, a resident of Chicago. William Wenzel received his education in the public and mechanical drawing schools of Milwaukee, where as a young man he learned the trades of locksmith, sheet iron worker, coppersmith, steam fitter, plumber and machinist, spending eight years in fitting himself for the business in which he was to become so successful in after life. In 1876 he came to Appleton, and during eight years was connected with the Kimberly-Clark Company, after which he opened a small plumbing establishment, which has since grown to generous proportions. Mr. Wenzel is now engaged in manufacturing filtering materials for breweries and glue factories, pumps, beer filters, water filters, filter mass washing machines, self-registering gasoline tanks, condensers and hydraulic vacuum systems for sulphide mills. Mr. Wenzel has the only testing machine for testing steam gauges in this part of the state, and he has protected all of his inventions by patents. His business operations now cover a wide area, and his trade includes some of the large business houses in Wisconsin. In 1878 Mr. Wenzel was united in marriage with Sophia Schultz, a daughter of Fred. Schultz, of Appleton, and they have had eleven children, of whom four are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Wenzel and their children are members of Sacred Heart Catholic Church.

EDWARD S. ZEH, general farmer and stock raiser of Greenville township, has spent his life in this section, where he now owns a well-cultivated farm of eighty acres, and where he is serving his seventh year as clerk of the school board. He was born July 27, 1880, in Greenville township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, a son of Henry Zeh and Hannah (Hoh) Zeh, natives of Saxony, Germany. Henry Zeh was born April 27, 1837, and his wife April 5, 1838, and they came to America at a very early date, settling in Milwaukee, where Mr. Zeh followed the trade of cooper. Some years previous to the Civil War the family came to Outagamie county, and Mr. Zeh purchased a farm, on which he spent the remainder of his life, dying in Greenville township, August 7, 1910, his wife having passed away July 6, 1903. Of their seven children, four are now living, as follows: William, a stock dealer, residing at Seymour; Lucetta, widow of W. S. Leppla, residing at Edgar, Wisconsin; Fred, a retired citizen of Appleton, Wisconsin; and Edward S. Edward S. Zeh received a district school education, and remained on the home farm with his parents until his marriage, at which time he purchased his present farm, a fine tract of eighty acres on which he has made many improvements, formerly known as the Tom McGhan farm. He operates along scientific lines, using the most modern power machinery, and is known as one of the practical farmers of his section. He is a member of the Modern Woodmen, in which he is very popular. On May 7, 1903, he was united in marriage with Josephine Schmit, daughter of Peter R. Schmit and Mary (Hoier) Schmit. The parents of Mrs. Zeh were early settlers of Outagamie county, residing in Ellington township until their retirement in 1908. Mr. and Mrs. Zeh have had three children: Edward Earl, born December 29, 1903; Fayette Sylvester, September 10, 1905; and Chester Donald, December 2, 1906. Mr. Zeh is giving his children good school training, as he has always been a great advocate of the cause of education, and he is now serving in his seventh year as clerk of the school board. In political matters he is independent.

HENRY N. SCHLIMM, whose farm of 100 acres, located in Greenville township, is one of the finely equipped and well-cultivated tracts of this section, was born in Center township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, May 22, 1879, and is a son of Henry and Susana (Martiny) Schlimm. Mr. Schlimm's parents were born in Belgium, and were married in Center township, whence Henry Schlimm came in 1863, after having spent a short time in Milwaukee. He engaged in agricultural pursuits, and continued to cultivate his farm until his death in 1888. His widow, who survives him, now makes her home with her daughter in Center township. Henry N. Schlimm's early education was secured in the township and Catholic schools, and in later years he took a short course at the dairy school at Madison. He remained on the home farm until he was twenty-one years of age, at which time he engaged in cheese making in Center township, but after one year went to Mifflin, Iowa county, Wisconsin, where he also spent one year. He next took a trip to California, where he spent two months, one month being on a big cattle ranch, and he then returned to Wisconsin, and for one year was connected with the Paine Lumber Company in Oshkosh. After severing his connections with this concern he went to Appleton, and for two years was in the employ of the paper mills, but left this concern to purchase his present Fox River farm, which he has since been operating and carrying on dairy farming. Mr. Schlimm is a member of the Roman Catholic Church, and his political belief is that of the Republican party, but he has never aspired to public office. He was married June 16, 1908, to Miss Lena Hopfensperger, born in Harrison township, Calumet county, Wisconsin, October 16, 1885, daughter of Peter and Mary (Hartzheim) Hopfensperger, natives of Outagamie and Calumet counties, respectively. In early life Peter Hopfensperger was a butcher at Darboy, Wisconsin, and later he also engaged in the retail liquor business, but in 1908 sold out and moved to Buchanan township, where he is engaged in farming. Mr. Hopfensperger has held various township offices. Mr. and Mrs. Schlimm have had one child: Viola Helen, born July 17, 1909.

SIEGFRIED LEHRER who has spent his life in agricultural pursuits in Greenville township, where he now owns a fine farm of eighty acres, as well as forty acres of timber and pasture land, was born December 10, 1871, on his present farm in Greenville township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin. One of the children of Richard and Anna (Becker) Lehrer, natives of Austria. Richard Lehrer was born May 7, 1836, and his wife August 17, 1833, and they were married in Outagamie county, Mr. Lehrer having come to the United States in 1866 and settled first in New York, a short time thereafter coming to Appleton, where he was employed in a tannery for two years. He then moved to the farm in Greenville township, which he, in partnership with his father, had purchased some years previously, and there he resided until his retirement in 1899. He now resides in New London, his wife having died in Greenville township in 1894. They were the parents of five children, Siegfried being the third in order of birth. Siegfried Lehrer received his education in the schools of Greenville township, and started to work as a hand on the home farm as soon as he was old enough, and at the time of his father's retirement, in 1899, he rented the property from him. He farmed thus for a period covering six years, when he bought the home place, and he now has eighty acres under cultivation, and forty acres in timber and pasture land, two miles north. He carries on general and dairy farming, and makes a specialty of breeding Holstein cattle, devoting his entire time to his farm and its interests. His politics are those of the Democratic party, although he has never aspired to public office, and he and Mrs. Lehrer are devout members of the Roman Catholic Church. On June 26, 1900, Mr. Lehrer was married to Miss Rosa Bauer, born in Grand Chute township, daughter of Andrew Bauer, and to this union there has been born one daughter: Regina, born July 15, 1902, who is attending school. Mr. Lehrer is a member of the Catholic Knights, in which he is very popular, and he is known throughout this section as a good, practical farmer and public-spirited citizen.

MARTIN AUGUST SCHULZE, one of the old and honored residents of Greenville township, Outagamie county, now living retired after many years spent in agricultural pursuits, was born August 19, 1832, in the Province of Brandenburg, Prussia, and is a son of Daniel and Louisa (Beernd) Schulze, natives of the same country, where Daniel Schulze was born December 25, 1805, and his wife January 1, 1808. In 1839, Mrs. Schulze died in Germany, leaving five children: Ann; Charles, of Appleton; Martin August; Fredrick and Wilhelmine. Mr. Schulze was married again in Milwaukee in 1848, his second wife being a widow, Mrs. Henrietta Schmidt. In 1846 the family came to the United States, locating at once in Milwaukee, from whence, in 1853, they made their way to Outagamie county, settling in native woods in a rude, log cabin in Section 3, Greenville township. At this time Appleton was a little village, and between the towns of Greenville and Appleton there were but three houses His first few months in the new section were spent in clearing, that he might get started, and the remainder of his life was spent on this farm, he becoming a prosperous and well-known agriculturist and the owner of 460 acres of good farming land. He died in the faith of the Lutheran Church in 1879, and his interment took place in the Greenville cemetery. In politics he was a Democrat, but never wanted an office, owing to his inability to speak the English language. By his second wife Mr. Schulze had four children: August, of Ellington; Daniel, a farmer of Greenville township; Robert William and Frank, all engaged in farming. Martin August Schulze attended school at Tainzel, Prussia, and after three and one-half months of journey landed in Milwaukee in 1846 and went to work as a clerk in a Milwaukee hat and cap store. Later he went to work for another establishment for two years, then went to St. Louis, and later to Texas, where he was swindled out of his money. He really wanted to go to New Orleans only. While in New Orleans he concluded to go to Cuba, and accordingly joined a company organized to assist Lopez in the struggle against Spain. News came before their departure that fifty Americans had been massacred by the Spaniards, which so incensed the company that it destroyed a Spanish printing office, the Jenny Lind saloon, Fernandez tobacco house and the Spanish market. Fearing arrest and detention Mr. Schulze hastened his departure from that locality, discarded his uniform and took a boat, going to Memphis and later to Evansville, Indiana, and from there to Chicago, from whence he walked to Milwaukee. In the spring of the following year he came to Greenville township with his father and worked for him and others at farming during the summers and in the pineries of this state in the winters, but eventually bought the farm on which he now lives from the Government. He still later purchased the forty acres adjoining, and now has eighty-seven and three-quarters acres in his property, having given his son a tract of twenty acres for a building place. Mr. Schulze is now living retired, his youngest son attending to the farm. On July 21, 1859, Mr. Schulze was married to Paulina Steinke, born in Prussia, April 19, 1840, daughter of Francis Christian and Hannah Beate (Menge) Steinke, the former born in West Prussia in 1804, and the latter in Prussia March 21,1804. The family came to the United States in 1855, Mr. Steinke being by trade a blacksmith, an occupation which he followed near Maysville, Dodge county, where he died at the age of fifty-six years. His widow continued to reside there for some time, and then came to Outagamie county, and spent some years with Mr. Schulze, but later went to live with another son-in-law, August Frederick, in Appleton, where her death occurred in 1884. Mr. and Mrs. Schulze have had six children, as follows: Emma Louisa, born February 12, 1862, wife of Herman Daw, of Portland, Oregon; William Martin, born August 8, 1863, residing on an adjoining farm in Ellington township; Clara Augusta, born July 20, 1866, wife of Charles Masche, residing two miles south of Hortonville; Edward Paul, born July 28, 1868, agent and operator for the Northwestern Railroad, at Michigamie, Michigan; Albert Franklin, born October 12, 1874, who is operating the old homestead; and Julia Paulina, born December 14, 1880, the wife of Henry Riesenweber, a farmer of Ellington township. Mr. Schulze is a Democrat in politics, and has served his township as road supervisor and clerk of the school board.

FERDINAND J. BLEICK. Among the representative self-made agriculturists of Greenville township, Outagamie county, none commands greater respect than this gentleman. He is a native of this township, born September 28, 1872, a son of John and Louisa (Brockman) Bleick, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany, where the former was born December 24, 1835, and the latter January 26, 1826. John Bleick was about fourteen years of age at the time he came to America with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Bleick, his brother, Ludwig, and his sister Dorothy, accomplanying them. Frederick Bleick was a laboring man in Germany, and thinking that he could better his condition and that of his family he started for Milwaukee, completing a long and perilous journey when the family arrived in that city by boat from Quebec, where they had come from Hamburg. After a year spent in Milwaukee, the family moved on to Outagamie county, traveling via ox-team, and settling on section 10 on land that had been pre-empted some time before by John and Ludwig Bleick. Here the parents spent the rest of their lives. John Bleick had received an education in the schools of his native country, but had no knowledge of the English language when he first came here, but he soon acquired enough information to be able to do business among the English-speaking people of the new section, and he was also strong and industrious and worked at whatever he could find to do, splitting rails, chopping cord wood, and making numerous trips to Appleton and other points, although these trips during the early days were not without danger, as he found out when he encountered a large black bear on one of his sojourns. On another trip he carried fifty pounds of flour on his back from the village of Little Chute to his home, although in that same month the few other farmers of the vicinity were sending their ox-teams to the village for their provisions, on account of the inclemency of the weather. In 1855, John Bleick was married at Greenville, to Louisa Brockman, also a native of Germany, and they located on an eighty-acre tract in Greenville township, which was very poor property, being nearly all swamp land, but at the time of his death, in 1902, he had acquired a farm of 227 acres, over 200 of which were in a state of cultivation. He was a member of the Lutheran Church, and a Democrat in politics, being elected to various offices of honor and trust. His widow, who still survives, makes her home with her son Herman, who is a representative farmer of Greenville township. The other children were: Minnie, wife of C. A. Gielow, of Manitowoc; Charles, a farmer of Greenville township; Augusta, who married Gus Zuhlke, of Hortonville; Lizzie, wife of Ed Wigert, of Dale township; Ferdinand J.; and Ida, deceased.

Ferdinand J. Bleick attended the district schools of Greenville township and also spent a year in study at Hortonville, and at the age of twenty-two years began farming a part of his father's property. He now has 100 acres in an excellent state of cultivation, devoting the land to general farming, and also doing some dairying and stock raising. He devotes all of his time to his farm, and bears the reputation of being one of the good, practical agriculturists of his section. He is a member of Greenville Lodge, No. 9033, Modern Woodmen of America, in which he is present escort, is independent in politics, and connected with the Lutheran Church. In 1895 he was married to Miss Lena Luebben, who was born in Greenville township, March 4, 1875, daughter of Gerhardt and Sophia (Dayho) Luebben, natives of Luxembourg and Mecklenburg, Germany, respectively, the former born August 18, 1826, and the latter July 27, 1836. They came to the United States at a very early day, settling in Cedarburg, Wisconsin, and later coming to Outagamie county, where they bought a farm, on which Mr. Luebben died March 24, 1897. His widow remained on the farm a short time, then going to Neenah for two years, after which she again resided on the home farm for a short time and then went to Appleton, where she now lives: She and her husband had twelve children, of whom Mrs. Bleick was the tenth in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Bleick have had one child: John Gerhard, born May 17, 1896, residing at home.

JACOB J. HAUERT, one of the leading merchants of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is the proprietor of a large hardware business, is also well known in fraternal circles of this city. He was born in Brookfield, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, February 21, 1858, and is a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Reineman) Hauert, both of whom are now deceased. Jacob Hauert was born in Baden, Germany, from which country he came to the United States in young manhood and settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. During the year 1849, when gold was discovered in California, he decided to try his fortunes in the far West, and traveled overland to the goal of the gold seekers. He was more fortunate than a great many other prospectors, and soon had accumulated enough money to return by boat, and bought Government land in Waukesha county, Wisconsin, after his marriage in Milwaukee. Here, while he was engaged in farming, all of his nine children were born, as follows: Henry, deceased, who was engaged in business with his father and brother for some years, was married and had a son, Robert; George, a retired farmer of Oshkosh, has a Wife and two children; Jacob J.; one child who died in infancy; Annie, who died at the age of thirteen years; Julia, who married Henry Kossel, a resident of Oshkosh engaged in the real estate business; Frank W., engaged in the flour, feed and seed business in Appleton, is married and has three children; Fred, who conducts a general store at Black Creek, Wisconsin, has a wife and two children; and Amelia, married Henry Losselyoung, an Appleton mail carrier, and has two children. In about the year 1868, Jacob Hauert began to make trips to Outagamie county in order to invest his money in loans, and about 1874 he purchased a half interest in the Charles Morey flour mill, the firm becoming Morey & Hauert, which later changed to Weiland & Hauert, and Wamboldt, Hauert & Company, Incorporated, and eventually the Hauerts severed their connections with the concern entirely. Mr. and Mrs. Hauert came to Appleton to live in 1875, and his death occurred here January 19, 1905, at the age of eighty-four years, Mrs. Hauert passing away January 22, 1909. Mr. Hauert was always a supporter of church and charitable movements, and of anything that promised to benefit his community.

Jacob J. Hauert received a common school education, and at the age of sixteen years commenced to learn the trade of miller in the mill of his father. In 1881 Mr. Hauert and his brother Henry engaged in the flour and feed business in Appleton, and they continued together until 1888, when Jacob J. sold out to engage in the hardware business with William Hagen. In 1895 he bought Mr. Hagen's interest in the business, and during 1892 he erected the present building, a two-story structure with basement, 25x90 feet, and in July of that year established his business there. He has been very successful in his venture and is considered one of the substantial men of his city. On January 10, 1882, Mr. Hauert was married to Sophia Koehn, of Appleton, daughter of Henry Koehn, and they have had five children: Emma, who married Max Elias and resides in Appleton; Wilbert, who is engaged in business with his father, married Dora Polland; Alvin, connected with the Majestic Construction Company of Milwaukee; and Roy and Adeline, at home. Mr. Hauert is prominent in fraternal circles of Appleton, being a member of Rhine Lodge of Modern Woodmen, the Equitable Fraternal Union and the Eagles, and he is treasurer of the Harmony Club and of the Fair Association. In 1910 he was elected to the office of city assessor.

M. F. MITCHELL, manager of the Continental Clothing House, the largest establishment of its kind in Appleton, has had a wide and varied experience in this line of business and is well known to the clothing trade of Northern Wisconsin. He was born in Illinois in 1858, and is a son of Simeon and Isabella Mitchell, who came to Appleton in 1894. Simeon Mitchell located in Lake county, Indiana, in 1859, and in 1867 went to Carthage, Missouri, where he resided twenty-two years. In 1887 he went to Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and in 1891 located at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, going thence to Appleton, where he resided until 1903, and in that year went to Fond du Lac, where his death occurred. Mrs. Mitchell died at Fond du Lac in 1906. They had a family of five children, as follows: M. F.; Catherine, who married Professor George Ashley; R. M., in the gents' furnishing business at Fond du Lac; W. T., also engaged in that line in that city; and Mary, who married R. A. Metcalf of New York City. M. F. Mitchell received his early educational training in the schools of Jasper county, Missouri, and as a young man became a clerk in a dry goods store in Carthage, Mo. He moved to Iowa in 1887, working one year for Stern & Wilner at Cedar Rapids, and then entering the employ of S. B. Dicks, with whom he remained five years and at the end of that time was again associated with Mr. Stern as manager of his store at Ottumwa, Iowa, continuing there ten months. The Continental Clothing House was opened September 15, 1894, by Sam Stern, of Chicago, M. F. and R. M. Mitchell being the managers, and the firm is now Stern, Ullman Company, M. F. Mitchell and E. J. Koch managers. Thirteen men are employed in this house, which deals in all supplies for men except shoes, and a specialty is made of Hart, Shaffner & Marx clothing. It is the biggest establishment of its kind in Appleton, having a first floor space 30x120 feet, and a second story 30x60 feet. It is modern in every way, and Mr. Mitchell's long experience has fitted him to fill the position which he holds with much ability. In July, 1885, Mr. Mitchell was married to Nettie A. White, of Carthage, Missouri, daughter of J. B. and Jennie (Black) White, and three children have been born to this union: Matthew White, who is attending business college, has just attained his majority; Robert Baxter, aged nineteen years, who is attending Lawrence University; and William Dean, a public school pupil, aged fourteen years. The family is connected with the Episcopal Church, and Mr. Mitchell is connected with the Elks and the River View Country Club.

ANTHONY J. KOCH, one of the managers of the Continental Clothing Store, a large business interest of Appleton, was born at Watertown, Wisconsin, June 8, 1861, and is a son of Bernhard and Josephine (Isphording) Koch, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1850 and settled at Watertown, where both died. Anthony J. Koch was the second of his parents' three children and his education was secured in the public and parochial schools. After graduating from the latter he learned the saddlery business with his father, who was engaged in that line all his life, and after the latter's death, in 1880, went to Chicago and followed the same occupation until 1884. He then went to Boyd, Chippewa county, Wisconsin, where he secured employment in a gents' furnishing store, and in 1896 came to Appleton, where he formed a partnership with the firm of D. M. and A. Geenen, conducting a drygoods store. He continued with them until 1898, at which time he sold out his interests and became one of the managers of the Continetal Clothing Store. This company has a large, up-to-date store, and a complete stock of men's wear is kept. His experience as a salesman has proved valuable, and as he is a man of much executive ability he has been successful as a manager, many of his ideas being tried with excellent results. On October 10, 1888, Mr. Koch was united in marriage with Mary M. Smith, of Freedom township, Outagamie county, daughter of Anton and Berdina Smith, who came to Outagamie county fifty-two years ago, Mr. Smith following farming during the remainder of his life. Five children were born to this union: Meta and Estella, who died in infancy; Verona, attending Lawrence University; Evelyn, attending high school; and Gerald, who is a student in the public schools. The family is connected with St. Joseph's Church of the Catholic faith, and Mr. Koch supports movements of a church and charitable nature.

WICHMANN BROTHERS. One of the prosperous and well-known business enterprises of Appleton, Wisconsin, is the large grocery and seed firm of Wichmann Brothers, the proprietors of which, George E. and Henry M. Wichmann, are substantial business citizens of this place. The business is carried on at No. 720-722 College avenue, in a two-story brick building, with a floor space of 33x90 feet, and a full stock of staple and fancy groceries and seeds of all kinds is handled by six employes. This business was bought by its present proprietors from R. G. Tarrant, in 1891, and has grown steadily since that date, numerous improvements having been made to the building, and various innovations having been introduced. The Wichmann Brothers are natives of Appleton, and sons of Frederick and Mariah (Seelow) Wichmann, natives of Trebses, Germany, who came to Appleton in 1870. Later Mr. Wichmann purchased a farm in Grand Chute township, on which he carried on operations until his retirement. His wife died July 15, 1908, having been the mother of nine children, as follows: Mrs. J. Rohloff, of Appleton; Mrs. G. C. Neuman, of Appleton; Mrs. H. Filz, of this city; Lena, residing at home; William, a mechanic of Appleton, who married Emma Mueller and has three children; Louis J., a furniture dealer and undertaker of Appleton, who has served as supervisor of the Fifth Ward for two terms, married Augusta Holmston and has a family of two children; George E., who married Emma Armge and has one child; Henry N., who married Elma Christof and has two children; and Frederick J., Jr., a resident of Appleton, who married Amelia Retzloff. All of the members of the family are connected with St. Paul's Lutheran Church in Appleton.

THEODORE H. FRITZ. One of the leading business establishments of its kind in Appleton, Wisconsin, is the National Laundry, which has nearly doubled its operations during the last two years during which time it has been under the management of its present owner, Mr. Theodore H. Fritz. The National Laundry was established in 1902, by Irmiger & Hutton, at 980 College avenue, on the 24x70 foot property of D. S. Stewart. Modern machinery has been installed in the two-story structure, fourteen employes are kept busy and two wagons used in delivery, and including the carpet cleaning department the National has almost as large a business as all the other companies added together, Mr. Fritz having nearly doubled the scope of its operations during the two years that he has owned the business. Mr. Fritz is a member of the Royal Order of Moose and the Fraternal Reserve Association.

COLONEL NATHAN E. MORGAN, whose long and conspicuous military record entitles his name to a place of prominence in any history of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, has also been prominently connected with civic and industrial affairs in Appleton, where he is now a member of the well known contracting firm of Campbell & Morgan. Colonel Morgan was born May 19, 1842, in Waynesburg, Chester county, Pennsylvania, a son of Reese and Mary (Rogers) Morgan, the former a native of Morgantown, Berks county, Pennsylvania, and a son of Jehu Morgan, the son of a native of Wales who was a soldier during the Revolutionary War. Colonel Morgan's maternal grandfather was William H. Rogers, a native of Ireland. Reese Morgan died in 1892, in Pennsylvania, where the mother survived him some years, making her home with her daughters, in addition to whom there were two sons. Nathan E. Morgan attended the district schools of his native vicinity, and until he was sixteen years of age worked on the home farm. One year later he entered Parkersburg Academy, and after remaining there one year went to Sinking Spring, Berks county, and engaged in school teaching until 1861. At this time he went to the northern peninsula of Michigan, locating in Ontonagon county, and until 1869 was employed in the store of his uncle, B. T. Rogers, then going to Chicago and engaging in the retail boot and shoe business. During the winter of 1864-65 he went to the mining lands of northern Michigan, where he was engaged in hunting and trapping, and he still has interests in that part of the country. In 1871 Mr. Morgan sold out his Chicago interests to his partner, and during September of the same year located in Appleton, where during the next year, in company with Captain Turner, he erected the Waverly House and conducted it until 1875, Mr. Morgan at this time becoming interested in the livery business. Two years later he became a dealer in cattle, and continued in this line until 1885, when he was elected city clerk, in which capacity he acted for a period covering eleven years. He next served as city assessor for one term and for one year of a second term, when he resigned the office to engage actively in the Spanish American War, which had just then broken out. Colonel Morgan was first-sergeant of a battery of artillery organized in northern Michigan in 1863, for protection against the Indians, it being the time of the terrible massacre at New Ulm, Minnesota, and the settlers being greatly worried that a like catastrophe might occur in Michigan as the Indians were there in great numbers at that time. The company, which was equipped by the State, remained in service for about eight months. In 1882, when the "Appleton Light Infantry," Company G, Second Regiment, Wisconsin National Guard, was formed, Mr. Morgan became a member, and he received his conmission as captain July 16, 1883, in which capacity he served for eleven years, when he was made major. He served as major of the First Battalion, Second Infantry, Wisconsin National Guards through the Porto Rico campaign, and after the war, upon the reorganization of the regiment was made its colonel. After serving in that capacity for eight years he was attached to the governor's staff, and he still continues to act in that position. Prior to 1906, Colonel Morgan had served as tax commissioner in Brown, Winnebago and Shawano counties, having been appointed by the Circuit Judge to equalize the taxes in these counties. In 1904 Colonel Morgan was nominated on the Democratic ticket for the office of Congressman, and although his district has a Republican majority of 8,500, he was only defeated by his opponent, Edward S. Minor, by 4,800 votes. Fraternally, he is connected with the Masons, the Modern Woodmen and the Elks. With his family, he attends the Episcopal church.

In 1867, Colonel Morgan was married to Virginia Birtenshaw, daughter of James Birtenshaw, of Detroit, Michigan, and they have the following children: Mrs. Crammer, who resides in Washington; Benjamin, who lives in Appleton; Royden C., of Portland, Oregon; and Marian, at home.

JULIUS KAHN, secretary, treasurer and general manager of the Appleton Toy and Furniture Company, one of the large industries of Appleton, Wisconsin, engaged in the manufacture of lawn furniture and children's toys, was born in Germany in 1860, and whose parents now live in England. Julius Kahn came to the United States in 1883, and after locating in Chicago, began traveling for a wholesale jewelry establishment, with which he was connected for ten years. In 1893 he opened a jewelry store in Appleton, but in 1899 sold out to F. C. Hyde & Co., and became connected with the firm with which he is now associated. The Appleton Toy and Furniture Company was organized in July, 1899, succeeding the Union Toy and Furniture Company, which, in turn, had succeeded Bower. The company's first building consists of two stories, 50x90 feet; the second, one-story 40x60 feet, and the third, three stories, 50x100 feet, and water and steam power is used, eighty employes being engaged. During the spring of the year the company manufactures porch and lawn furniture, and in the fall children's sleds, chairs and "shoo flies" or hobby horses are made. The output being disposed of principally to the jobbers. The company makes the best goods of its kind manufactured in the United States, and the business has tripled since the present company has owned the factory.

HENRY JENNERJAHN, a prosperous farmer of Greenville township, Outagamie county, is a German by birth, born in Mecklenburg, October 15, 1847, a son of Christian and Mary Jennerjahn. The parents of Mr. Jennerjahn, also natives of Mecklenburg, where they were born November 3, 1813, and January 1, 1818, respectively, came to the United States in 1854, arriving in Greenville township on Ascension Day, and immediately settled on the farm that is now occupied by Henry Jennerjahn. The couple spent the remainder of their lives in clearing.and cultivating this farm, and here the mother died October 3, 1883, and Mr. Jennerjahn followed her to the grave October 3, 1888. They were the parents of five children, as follows: Christian, who died from the effects of army life, at St. Louis, Missouri, while returning home at the close of the Civil War; John, also deceased; Henry; Mary, the wife of John Julius, a farmer of Greenville township; and Louis, a farmer in Greenville township. Henry Jennerjahn received his education in the district schools of Greenville township, and was reared on the family homestead, which he has never left. For some years he operated it in partnership with his father, but eventually he bought the land, and he is now operating the eighty acres along general lines. He raises good crops, and his property shows that the manager is a thrifty and practical agriculturist. Mr. Jennerjahn is a member of the Greenville Lutheran Church, and in political matters is an independent Democrat, but he has never cared for political favors. He was married January 6, 1871, to Miss Sophia Bushmann, who was born in Clayton township, Outagamie county, October 1, 1852, daughter of Fred and Dora (Fulcer) Bushmann, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany, where the father was born June 24, 1818, and the mother January 1, 1829. They were married in Germany and came to the United States in 1852, locating in Clayton township, and during the following year purchased twenty-eight acres of land. Later Mr. Bushmann bought an eighty-acre tract in Greenville township, on which he lived until his wife's death, November 12, 1891, when he sold his property and went to live with his children, his death occurring May 25, 1906. He and Mrs. Bushmann had four children: Sophia; Louise, the wife of Gust Nagel, a resident of Neenah; Edith, the wife of Fred Pingil, residing at Priest River, Idaho; and Mary, wife of Louis Westphal, a retired resident of Appleton.

Mr. and Mrs. Jennerjahn have had nine children: Ida, who is deceased; Johnnie, a farmer of Green county, Illinois; Arthur, residing at White Hall, Illinois, an employe of the tile factory; Doretta, deceased; Hattie, the wife of Louis Hoh; Herman, residing on the farm adjoining that of his father; Henry, residing at home; Lizzie, the wife of Ernst Coonrad, a farmer near Marion; and one child that died in infancy.

EDWARD JAGER, who has a fine farm of eighty acres located in section 26, Cicero township, has been a resident of this section for more than forty years, and has taken an active part in the progress and development of this part of Outagamie county. Mr. Jager is a native of Heallp, Pomerania, Germany, and was born September 16, 1840, a son of Charles Jager, who died when Edward was sixteen years of age. The other children born to Mr. Jager's parents were: Alberta, Albert, Hannah and Reca. Edward Jager received his education in the schools of his native country, where he worked as a shepherd until coming to the United States in 1867, at which time he began working out among the farmers of Cicero township. After working for others for six years, Mr. Jager had accumulated enough means by economy and thrift to purchase a farm of eighty acres in section 26, Cicero township, but which bore little resemblance to the excellent, well-cultivated tract of today. Not only was there no road leading to this property, but not a stick thereon had been cut, and the virgin soil was free from improvements of any kind. Mr. Jager soon erected a small log cabin and log stable and began to clear the timber from his property, which he has improved year by year until he now has one of the finest properties of its size in Cicero township. The whole tract is productive and well-cultivated, and on it are situated a fine seven-room residence, a barn 36x94 feet, a substantial chicken house and other good outbuildings. In addition to engaging in a general line of farming, Mr. Jager is well known as a breeder of registered stock, and he has a large herd of full-blooded Holstein cattle. Forty years ago, Mr. Jager was married to Albertina Abel, a native of the Fatherland, and they have been the parents of three boys, namely: Otto, Robert and Edward.

EWALT COURT, who is well known to the citizens of Cicero township, as one of the prominent farmers and stock raisers of this section, was one of the early settlers of this part of Outagamie county, having come here as early as 1868, since which time he has been an active participant in the progression and development of the community. The name Court is a derivation from Cuhrt, as it was spelled in Germany, in which country Mr. Court was born August 21, 1846. He was twenty-two years of age when he came to the United States, working first for the farmers around Appleton for three years and in the pulp mills of that city. He was married in 1874 to Mary Zick, also a native of Germany, and soon after marriage they located on his present farm in Cicero township. At this time not a particle of clearing had been done on this property. Maple trees two feet thick stood on the present site of his residence, and it looked like an almost hopeless task to try to put this land into condition to produce satisfactory crops. In additiorn to this, Mr. Court had nothing but the crudest of machinery, and his other possessions consisted of a cow and a team of oxen, the latter of which were used for seven years before he could afford to get horses. These handicaps did not daunt Mr. Court in the least, however, as he had a firm determination to succeed as a farmer, and he at once set about the task of chopping down the trees, removing the stumps and then breaking the land for crops, and as the work progressed year by year he soon found himself the owner of valuable property. Twenty acres were added to his original purchase and these too were soon cleared, and he then decided that the little log cabin, 18x24 and the log stable, 18x20 feet, were too small for his needs and subsequently erected a large, handsome residence, surrounded by velvety lawns and shade trees, and a substantial barn, 36x56, to which he later added a basement and enlarged to 36x92 feet. Mr. Court's life has been filled with hard, unremitting work, but it has always been honest labor, and he can now look back over a useful life filled with good deeds. He has been very successful in his operations and has given his sons each a farm and his daughters enough of a competence to start them on any career they may desire to follow. The children are: William, Huldah, Matilda, Henry, Martha and Alma. Mr. Court stands high in the esteem of his fellow-townsmen who have elected him to offices of an educational nature for twenty years, but he now feels that he has done his duty in this line, and desires that the remainder of his life may be spent quietly in the bosom of his family.

ALBERT ROSENBERG, one of Outagamie county's successful farmers and stock raisers, who is carrying on operations on section 33, Cicero township, was born in Pomerania, Germany, September 5, 1849, and is a son of Charles and Gusta Rosenberg, the former of whom died when Albert was but four years old. Mr. Rosenberg's brothers and sisters, were: Charles, who died in Chicago when sixty-five years of age; Fred and Anna, who also came to the United States, and Herman, Gusta and Minnie, who remained in Germany, Albert Rosenberg came to the United States in 1872 and first located in Dodge county, but after one summer there he went to Seymour township and worked for seven years. He then purchased forty acres of land where he now lives, the tract being practically wild, as only several acres had been cleared, and he soon purchased another tract of forty acres, building a log cabin 16x18 feet, a barn 26x60 feet and a stable 20x30 feet. Later, after he had improved his land he built a modern farm house and a granary 16x20 feet, and then erected a basement barn 38x70 feet. In addition to carrying on general farming, he breeds fine Holstein cattle, as well as pure-bred horses and hogs, and does quite a business in the gravel line, shipping fully 400 loads from his gravel beds in 1910. In 1877, Mr. Rosenberg was united in marriage with Miss Minnie Reetz, who was born in Pomerania, Germany, December 22, 1857, daughter of Wilhelm and Caroline Reetz, natives of that country, who came to the United States in 1871, and to this union there have been born seven children, one of whom died in infancy, while the survivors are: Mary, Albert, Minnie, Carrie, Ida and Emma.

ALBERT BRUSEWITZ, proprietor of a large farm in Cicero township, where he is engaged in general farming, chairman of the township board, and school treasurer of district No. 2, was born July 16, 1868, in Pomerania, Germany, and is a son of Herman and Fredericka (Beckman) Brusewitz. One other child was born to the parents of Mr. Brusewitz in Germany, Amelia, who died in that country. The family came to the United States in 1868, locating in Harland township, Shawano county, where Herman Brusewitz first day's work was the chopping down of a number of trees, for which he received as salary one dozen eggs. Later he acquired a farm of forty acres of wild land, on which was located a log cabin with a brush roof, and he at once started to clear his land, the country at that time being a vast wilderness with not even roads cut through from farm to farm. After clearing this land he began adding to this property, and at the time of his death was the owner of a highly productive farm of 120 acres, fully equipped with a handsome residence, substantial barn and good outbuildings. He died in 1903 at the age of sixty-three years, and his wife passed away in 1908, when sixty-six years of age. Mr. Brusewitz was a stanch Republican in politics. He had belonged to the Lutheran Church while in his native country, but after coming to America united with the German Evangelical Association, in the faith of which he died. He and his wife had the following children born to them in this country: Emil, who resides in Chicago; Charles, of Harland township, Shawano county; Emma, who married William Deering, of Shawano county; Clara, who married Mr. Sheldon, of Maywood, a suburb of Chicago; Robert, residing in Osborn township, Outagamie county; Edward and Ida, who died in infancy; Henry, who lives in Shawano county; and Minnie, who lives in Black Creek township, Outagamie county, married to Levi Schmeichel. Albert Brusewitz received his education in the district schools of his native township, and at the age of fourteen years began working in the vicinity of his home, taking home his wages to his parents every month. He made his home with his father, who provided for him handsomely at the time of his marriage to Bertha Wussow, and they located first at Marinette, Wisconsin, where Mr. Brusewitz operated a flour and feed store and a wood yard for three years, and then, disposing of the former business, conducted the wood yard alone for two years longer. At the end of this time he traded his business for a part of his present farm, and later bought fifty-four acres, the farm now containing 167 55-100 acres, located in Cicero and Black Creek townships, the addition having thereon a tumbledown log building. The buildings on Mr. Brusewitz' farm at the present time include an eight-room farm house, a basement barn 40x80, with a silo of 175 tons capacity attached, the barn being equipped with the Bidwell stalls for the cattle, an excellent ventilating system from roof to basement, and running water throughout the barn; and a chicken house, 16x50 feet, in addition to a cement creamery connected with the barn. He also has in course of construction a basement barn and stable for young stock, 36x60 feet, and has the plans for a horse barn, 30x60 feet. Mr. Brusewitz raises thoroughbred Guernsey cattle, Poland China and Chester hogs, Plymouth Rock chickens and Percheron horses. He is a Republican in politics and is present chairman of Cicero township and the treasurer of school district No. 2.

Mrs. Brusewitz was born in Harland township, Shawano county, Wisconsin, daughter of Charles and Wilhelmina (Simnicht) Wussow, natives of Germany, who came to this country and engaged in farming in Dodge county. He was a soldier during the Civil War, belonging to Company I, Thirty-second Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and died in 1892, aged sixty-two, years, his widow surviving until 1899, when she died at the age of sixty-three years. Their children were as follows: Henry, Emil, Ida, Bertha, Charles, Herman, August and William, the latter two deceased, and four who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Brusewitz have had four children, all of whom survive: Clarence, born October 31, 1895; Levern, born June 26, 1898; Mata, born May 26, 1902; and Clinton, born March 28, 1904.

DANIEL M. TORREY, who has played an important part in the development of that part of Outagamie county lying adjacent to Shiocton, has identified himself with various business enterprises in this city for many years, and has held a number of important offices in the gift of the people. He was born July 3, 1845, in Hinsdale, Berkshire county, Massachusetts, a son of Thomas R. and Achsah (Chapman) Torrey, natives of Massachusetts of English extraction. Thomas R. Torrey brought his family to Wisconsin in 1855 and settled in Liberty township, Outagamie county, in 1856, buying 120 acres of land from the Government and 160 acres from the State, this land being three and one-half miles from Shiocton and five miles from the nearest settler on the south, a Mr. Turney. In 1861 the family moved to Bovina township, one and one-half miles east of Shiocton, and continued to live thereon thirty-five years, at the end of which time Mr. Torrey sold out and moved to Iowa. One year later, however, he returned to Bovina township, and his death occurred shortly thereafter, he being buried in Shiocton. After her husband's death, Mrs. Torrey married a Mr. Preaton, and her death occurred in Hortonville, where her burial took place. The parents of Daniel M. Torrey had six children, he being the fourth in order of birth. Daniel M. Torrey received his education in the public schools of Massachusetts and Shiocton, and at the age of fourteen years he went to work in a sawmill, later engaging in various occupations in the woods and on the river until he was twenty years old. At this time he bought forty acres of land and rented some additional property, and engaged in farming for about six years, then moving into Shiocton, where he established himself in business as a buyer and seller of stock and as the proprietor of a meat market. He also engaged in the flour and feed business, and from the time when he first located in Shiocton he has been a notary public. He has been a justice of the peace for twenty-four years, a capacity in which he is serving at this time, was supervisor of the township for six years and served one year as town clerk. Seven years after coming to Shiocton, Mr. Torrey bought 110 acres of land, which he farmed for six years, and at the end of that time sold forty acres in ten-acre tracts for enough to pay for the original purchase, the balance of seventy acres being sold at fifty dollars an acre, the first time that land had brought that price in this section. In 1897 he purchased 200 acres of swamp land, in 100-acre tracts, and today one of these tracts is entirely cleared and under cultivation, while the other has forty acres cleared. Mr. Torrey is now engaged in the insurance business, and attends to his duties as notary public and justice of the peace.

In 1863, Mr. Torrey was married to Miss Abbie Tyler, the second of her parents' eight children, daughter of Nelson and Lydia Tyler, natives of Pennsylvania, who came to Wisconsin in 1860 and settled in Shiocton. They spent the remainder of their lives here and were buried in Rexford Cemetery, in Ellington. Mrs. Torrey, who died May 11, 1896, is buried in Liberty township. Mr. and Mrs. Torrey had one child: Elnora M., who married Charles Anson, of Liberty township, and he died March 28, 1904, leaving her with two sons. In March, 1898, Mr. Torrey was married (second) to Miss Loretta Lewis, daughter of Abner and Eliza (Griffin) Lewis, natives of New York and Canada, respectively, the former of whom died in April, 1886, and the latter in November, 1869. Mrs. Torrey died May 4, 1911, and was buried in Liberty Cemetery, and was beloved by all. Mr. Torrey is a member of the Odd Fellows, and is a Democrat in his political sympathies, although he votes independently. He is and Mrs. Torrey was connected with the Congregational Church of Shiocton.

PAUL HARTSWORM, whose residence in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, covers more than a half century, has for many years been engaged in farming and stock raising in Black Creek township, where he now owns a good farm of seventy acres on sections 31 and 32. Born January 1, 1844, in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, Mr. Hartsworm is a son of Henry and Maria Hartsworm, who came from Germany to the United States in 1843 and settled in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, where Henry Hartsworm, a farmer by occupation, passed away. His widow survived him some years and died in Outagamie county. They had ten children, and of these Paul was the fourth in order of birth. He was educated in the district schools and remained at home on the farm until 1863, in which year he enlisted for service in the Union army during the Civil War, and became a member of Company F, Forty-sixth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He served until the end of the war, being engaged principally in guard duty, and was finally mustered out of the service at Nashville, Tenn., with an excellent war record. On his return from the army, he rented a farm in Milwaukee county, on which he resided for one year, and then came to Outagamie county and rented a property in Greenville township. Five years later he became a renter on a Grand Chute township farm, and three years later came to Center township, where he rented land for six years. During the fall of 1882 Mr. Hartsworm located on the farm which he now occupies, there then being but thirty-five acres cleared and only a frame dwelling built on the property. He settled down at once to put this land under cultivation, and he now has an excellent property, well graded, properly drained and neatly fenced. All necessary buildings have been erected and the property has been beautified by the laying out of lawns and setting out of shade and fruit trees, and the tract now presents an excellent appearance. Mr. Hartsworm carries on general farming and stockraising, and his efforts have met with well-deserved success.

In March, 1866, Mr. Hartsworm was married to Mary Reinamann, who was born in 1845, the eldest of the five children born to her father's second marriage. Mrs. Hartsworm's parents were natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1842 and died in Appleton, Wisconsin. To Mr. and Mrs. Hartsworm there have been born the following children: George, a resident of Black Creek, who has five children; Minnie, who married Thomas Day, of Appleton, and has four children; Ella, who married Harry Allander, of Shiocton, and has two children; Henry, who died at the age of seven years; William, who is single and living at home; Benjamin, who married Antonia Werhman, living in Binghamton, and has five children; Julia, who married Martin Strope and died in 1897, leaving two children; and Mary, who is single and living at home. Mr. Hartsworm is a Republican in politics and has served as a member of the Black Creek school board.

FREDERICK SASMAN, who is carrying on agricultural operations on a farm of fifty-six acres, located in section 7, Black Creek township, is a native of New York State, where he was born October 9, 1863, a son of Lewis and Mary (Lueckel) Sasman, natives of Germany. The parents of Mr. Sasman were married in New York, and during the fall of 1873 came to Wisconsin, settling in Black Creek township, where they carried on farming until retiring from active life. They are now living at Appleton, the father being seventy-two years old and the mother seventy. On first coming to this county, Lewis Sasman purchased eighty acres in section 20, Black Creek township, and some time later added another eighty-acre piece. This land was practically all wild when he purchased it, but when he retired from agricultural activities in 1907, all but forty acres of timber had been cleared. Frederick Sasman was the eldest of his father's five children, and as soon as he was able he was put to work on the farm assisting his father in the clearing of the land to put it under cultivation, and he remained on the old home farm until his marriage, March 16, 1887, to Ethel M. Brainard. Mrs. Sasman was born June 2, 1866, daughter of Carlos M. and Frances A. (Seely) Brainard, natives of New York State. Carlos Brainard was a veteran of the Civil War, through which he served in a New York regiment, and during which, for eighteen months, he was confined in the Confederate prison at Salisbury. Directly after the war he brought his wife to Wisconsin, and they lived on a farm in Black Creek township, where the mother died in 1889, aged fifty-two years, the father removing to Appleton during 1890, where he now lives a retired life at the age of seventy-three years. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sasman: Eunice F., Cora E., Louis M. and Della E., the former two being stenographers, working at Madison, and the latter two residing at home.

Mr. Sasman has carried on extensive general farming operations in Black Creek township, and markets grain, hogs and cattle, in addition to dairy products. He is a member of the F. R. A., and in political matters is independent, he being at present the incumbent of the office of clerk of the school board. With his family, he attends the Congregational Church.

HENRY STAEDT, the owner of a fine property consisting of 111 acres, situated in Black Creek township, a member of the board of supervisors and treasurer of the school board, has been prominently identified wth the advancement of Black Creek along civic and industrial lines during the past decade. Mr. Staedt is a native of the Fatherland, where he was born November 19, 1875, a son of Ferdinand and Sophia Staedt, who came to the United States in 1884 and settled in Outagamie county, both now being residents of Greenville. Ferdinand Staedt is a farmer by occupation, and has followed his calling throughout life. He and his wife had five children, there being two older than Henry.

Henry Staedt secured his education in the district schools, and when he was but fifteen years of age he went to work on his own account, finding employment alnong the farmers of his neighborhood until he was twenty-three years old. At this time, in 1898, he was married to Miss Anna Krueger, who was born February 17, 1883, the eldest of the seven children of John and Martha Krueger, natives of Wisconsin, who are now residing in Appleton. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Staedt: Viola, Selma, Ester, Edith, Harold, Florence and Henry. After his marriage, Mr. Staedt rented farms for three years, and then purchased the place on which he now lives, a tract of 111 acres of good land lying in section 2, Black Creek township, of which he has forty acres in a fine state of cultivation, and here he erected a new barn in 1910. He has engaged in a general line of farming, producing large crops of grain, and also is engaged in raising hogs for the markets. He is a popular member of the E. F. U., and he and Mrs. Staedt are consistent attendants of the Lutheran Church of Seymour. In political matters Mr. Staedt is a stanch Republican, and he is now serving as a member of the board of supervisors, and as treasurer of the district school board, and for four years he has also served as assessor of Black Creek townlship. Mr. Staedt is a man of modern, progressive ideas, and is always ready to give of his time or attention to those movements which his judgment tells him will benefit his community in any way.

MATHEW KITZINGER, an energetic and progressive agriculturist of Black Creek township, Outagamie county, whose excellent farm of 100 acres is situated on section 21, was born October 19, 1857, in Belgium township, Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, son of Nicholas and Margaret (Jaeger) Kitzinger, natives of Germany who came to the United States in 1857 and settled in Wisconsin. After living in Belgium township for eighteen years they came to Outagamie county, and settled on the farm on which Mathew P. Kitzinger now operates. Here the father died in July, 1890, aged seventy-five years, and the mother is still living, having reached the advanced age of eighty-six years. About eighty acres of this farm are under cultivation, the land having been cleared and made ready for the plow by Mr. Kitzinger and his father, and they also made the improvements on the place, the residence being erected in 1882 and in 1904 being remodeled and rebuilt, making it a modern, handsome dwelling. At this time a basement barn, 40x74 feet was built, and other improveiments, including barb-wire fences, were introduced. Mr. Kitzinger is the fourth of a family of nine children, and he has always lived at home. In the fall of 1883. he was married to Margaret Hehlien, who was born in Ozaukee county, and died in 1885 at the age of twenty-five years, daughter of Andrew and Magdalena Hehlien, natives of Germany. One child was born to this union: Margaret, who married John Stadler, living with her father, and having one child. On June 4, 1886, Mr. Kitzinger was married to Miss Mary Jackels, born February 4, 1863, in Germany, daughter of Peter and Mary Jackels, who came to the United States from Germany about 1865 and settled in Calumet county, Wisconsin, and Mrs. Jackels died in 1891, at the age of fifty-six years, and Mr. Jackels is still living, having reached the age of eighty years. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kitzinger: Raymond and Sylvia, both living at home.

Mr. Kitzinger has been engaged in general farming and stockraising, and has met with well-deserved success in his efforts. He specializes to some extent in dairy products, hogs and grain, and is considered one of the good, reliable farmers of his district. In political matters he is a Democrat, but he has never aspired to public office, finding all of his time and attention claimed by his farming duties. He and Mrs. Kitzinger are consistent members of the Catholic Church at Black Creek.

JOHN G. WOLF. The high standard set by the farmers of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, is being maintained by John G. Wolf, of Black Creek township, who is carrying on operations on a fine tract of eighty acres in section 22, and also farms 100 acres in section 23 in partnership with his brother, W. F. Wolf. John G. Wolf was born October 14, 1876, in Black Creek township, Outagamie county, a son of Peter and Emelia (Bartman) Wolf, natives of Ger-mantown, Wisconsin, and Germany, respectively, and they were married in Black Creek township, whence the father had come in 1871 and purchased 160 acres of land, at this time all timber land. Here he built a frame house of four rooms and started to clear and develop the land, and when he had succeeded in putting 100 acres under cultivation, he remodeled the house, making it a modern structure of twelve rooms, built a basement barn 40x70 feet and numerous other buildings for the sheltering of stock and grain, and fenced his property completely with barbed wire. He died August 13, 1895, at the age of forty-four years, and his wife passed away September 22, 1904, when forty-nine years of age. Both are buried in St. John's Evangelical Cemetery in Black Creek township. Mr. Wolf was a Republican in politics, and served as supervisor for two years, town treasurer seven years, and town chairman for a like period, in addition to being a member of the school board for six years and a member of the building committee for the Outagamie county asylum. Eight children were born to Peter and Emelia Wolf, namely: Charles A., who is single, working at the trade of boilermaker, in Needles, Cal.; William F., who received a common school education, as have all the children, and is now serving his first term as clerk of Outagamie county, having also served two years as assessor and six years as chairman of Black Creek; John G., who is single and owns and operates the homestead; Ida, who married Charles Minlschmidt and lives in Black Creek; Annie, who is single, a trained nurse and living at home; Elmer E., who attended the Chicago Art Institute for two years, with the intention of becoming an artist, but is now working temporarily with the railroad surveying crew; Elma. G.., who died at the age of eighteen years, August 31, 1909, and is buried in the family lot in St. John's Evangelical Cemetery; and George, who died in infancy.

John G. Wolf has spent all of his life on the old homestead, and he has made a number of improvements since taking over the active management of the place. He is carrying on farming along general lines, and ships dairy products, hogs, cattle and grain. He is fraternally connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, is a Republican in political matters, and is connected religiously with St. John's Evangelical Church.

ALBERT DIETRICH, who was born in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, August 29, 1873, is now one of the well known agriculturists of Black Creek township, being the owner of 160 acres of valuable farming land on sections 22 and 23. His parents, August and Wilhelmina (Bruss) Dietrich, were natives of Germany who came to the United States about 1860 and settled first in the city of Milwaukee and later moved to Freedom, Outagamie county. Mr. Dietrich bought land and engaged in farming, living on this property until 1882, when he sold out and bought 120 acres in Black Creek township where Mr. and Mrs. Dietrich now make their home, he being seventy-nine years old and she sixty-four. Of their ten children, Albert was the next to the oldest. At the age of seventeen years he commenced working for wages on a near-by farm, and he so continued until 1900, by which time he had accumulated enough to purchase his present farm, a fertile tract of 160 acres on sections 22 and 23. He is engaged in general farming and stockraising, and ships hogs, cattle, grain and dairy products to the markets, and for five years has served as road commissioner. He and Mrs. Dietrich are members of St. John's Evangelical Church of Black Creek.

In 1900 Mr. Dietrich was married to Miss Anna Bartman, who was born February 18, 1878, the eldest of the children of Ferdinand and Minnie (Schmidt) Bartman. Mr. Bartman was born in Germany, April 2, 1853. Mrs. Bartman was born in Milwaukee, November 30, 1859, and died 1882. About two years later Mr. Bartman married Marie Zocholl, then lived on his farm until 1900. He then purchased a hotel where he and family are now living in the villaege of Black Creek, Wisconsin. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dietrich, namely: Lora, born June 12, 1902, and Lillian, born October 5, 1904.

ALBERT A. STEFFENS, a highly respected citizen of Black Creek township, Outagamie county, carrying on operations on a tract of 100 acres lying in section 25, Black Creek township, belongs to one of the old and honored families of this part of Wisconsin, and one that traces its ancestry back to the nobility of Belgium was born on the farm on which he now lives, May 21, 1859, a son of Joseph J. and Catharine (Herb) Steffens, natives of Belgium and Baden, Germany, respectively. The paternal grandmother of Albert A. Steffens was a member of the Royal family of Belgium, who by reason of her marrying below her rank was disinherited and given a, pension of $1,400 yearly. Leaving that country with her husband, she came to the United States in 1849, or about that time, the sailing vessel on which they were passengers taking a year and six months to make the journey, on account of terrific storms, disabling of the vessel and various accidents. One daughter of this couple had died in Belgium, and a son, Theopholus, remained in Belgium, being an officer in the Belgian army, but the remainder of the family came on to this country and made their way to Green Bay and thence by way of boat to Appleton, Wisconsin, there being no railroads at that early day the grandparents spent their lives here. Their eldest son, Edward, who never married, was a member and chairman of the board of aldermen of Appleton for twenty years and died about 1895, in Clark county, Wisconsin. The second son, August, was an officer in the Belgian army before coming to America with his parents, and when the Civil War broke out he enlisted and was commissioned a captain. After the war he returned to Belgium, where he was married, and brought his wife back to America, settling in Appleton, where he engaged in the retail liquor business for a few years and then establishing himself in the wholesale liquor trade at Red Wing, Minnesota, becoming quite wealthy. In 1888 he started on a trip to Belgium, to pay a visit, and met his death in railroad accident in Pennsylvania. The fourth son was Theopholus, who spent all of his life in Belgium. He was brought up and educated to become an officer in the Belgian army, in which he spent forty years, and at that time was retired and placed on the pension list with the rank of major general. He was given the Badge of Honor, which signifies continual service without violation of any rule or command while in the service for which punishment is inflicted, and this badge is now in the possession of Albert A. Steffens, who prizes it very highly. The eldest daughter was Alexandria., who married Nicholas Fresch, of Appleton, and died in Prescott Hospital about 1870. The second daughter, Leopoline, married Harry France, and died about 1876. The youngest daughter was Pauline, who married Francis Bernard and died in 1866.

Joseph J. Steffens, father of Albert A., was the third son of his parents, and he was a young man when the family came to this country from Belgium. He worked at various occupations in and around Appleton, Wisconsin, but eventually took up farming, as his father had claimed for each of the sons forty acres of land from the Government, under an act passed by the Government for the reclamation of the Wisconsin swamp lands. He sought out the forty acres that was his share, and this is a part of the land now owned by Albert A. Steffens in Black Creek township. He built a log shanty, where he lived all alone, working at various tasks for other settlers who needed his services, and as soon as he had accomplished the clearing of a small portion he planted it and carried the harvested crop to Appleton on his back. There were no roads at this time, and Mr. Steffens endured many hardships in his trips on foot through the woods, but soon he was able to purchase a team of oxen and he then considered himself a full-fledged farmer. During one of his twelve-mile trips to Appleton, he became acquainted with Catherine Herb, the daughter of one of the early settlers of the county, and they were eventually married and settled down to live in the little log home in the woods. In 1864, Mr. Steffens enlisted in Company E, Fifth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war, participating in the battles of Hatches Run, Fort Fisher and Petersburg, and being present at the surrender of General Lee. After completing his army service he returned to his farming operations, and acquired by purchase the land taken up by his brothers which had changed hands several times. Mr. Steffens served as assessor of Black Creek township from the time of its organization for fifteen years, and named the township after the creek that runs through its northwestern part. He died May 4, 1886, at the age of sixty-one years and is buried in the Catholic Cemetery near Five Corners, in Freedom township, while his widow survived him until May 6, 1892, and is buried near her husband. Mr. and Mrs. Steffens had five children: Albert A.; Amelia, who married Patrick Richev and died in Oregon in 1891, leaving seven children; Alexander, who died at the age of seventeen years, being accidentally shot while hunting deer; Pauline, who married John Raddemacher, and now lives in California, having four children; and Mary, who married John Nabbefeld, and lives in Saskatchewan, Canada.

Albert A. Steffens received but a limited education in the schools of his district, but this he later added to through much reading and study. He remained at home with his parents until his marriage, October 28, 1888, to Miss Matilda Huven, a daughter of Peter and Johannah (Nabbefeld) Huven, natives of Prussia, Germany, who came to the United States and settled in Washington county, Wisconsin about 1860, five years later coming to Outagamie county and settling in the town of Freedom. The mother died there in 1879, aged forty-four years, and the father then came to live with Mr. and Mrs. Steffens, at whose home he died January 11, 1899, aged seventy-two years. Mrs. Steffens was the fourth of her parents' twelve children, and was born April 12, 1863. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Steffens: Joseph, Johannah, Henry, Lawrence, Leo, Fred and Paul.

Mr. Steffens has engaged in general farming and stockraising and market dairy products, hogs and cattle and some grain. He is breeding to full-blooded Holstein cattle and Poland-China hogs and has a team of Percheron horses. His farm is fenced with barbed and woven wire and about ninety acres are under cultivation, and is a well-appearing, fertile and highly productive tract. Mr. Steffens is a member of the Catholic Knights Lodge No. 6, of Appleton, and is a Democrat in his political views, serving as clerk of the school board for four years. The family have always been connected with the Roman Catholic Church, and Mr. and Mrs. Steffens attend the church of that denomination in Freedom township.

THOMAS J. MULLEN, who is engaged in general farming on Section 36, Black Creek township, where he owns a tract of 180 acres of valuable farming property, was born December 16, 1852, at Rensselaer, New York, a son of Patrick and Bridget (Coogan) Mullen, natives of Ireland. They came to the United States about 1846, and settled first in New York State, where Mr. Mullen engaged in the manufacture of linen from flax, the mill being over the line in Vermont and the family residence in New York. In about 1855, Mr. Mullen and his family came from New York to Wisconsin, settling in East Troy, Walworth county, where they resided until the spring of 1865, and then began farming on 111 acres of land in Osborn township, a part of which is now owned by Thomas J. Mullen's brother. Here the father was engaged in clearing and cultivating the land until his death, January 3, 1888, at the age of seventy-eight years, while the mother passed away October 1, 1885, when sixty-three years of age. They are both buried in South OsbornCemetery, formerly St. Mary's. On first locating on this island, Patrick Mullen built a log house 18x24 feet, with three rooms on the main floor and a large attic which was afterwards partitioned into rooms, the roof for which was split from red oak timber, and this was Mr. Mullen's home until his death, at which time he had put about 65 of the 111 acres under cultivation, built a log barn and outbuildings, and fenced his property with rude rails. The east half of the farm was given to his son William, and the west half to James, the latter still living on his, while the former is deceased.

Thomas J. Mullen was the fourth of his parents' eight children, and he received a common school education, at the age of seventeen, passing the examination for the position of teacher. After being engaged as an educator for nine years, on August 25, 1873, he was married to Mary Crostwaite, daughter of John and Jeannette (Jude) Crostwaite, natives of Scotland and Ireland, respectively, who were married in East Troy, Wisconsin, and died in Osborn township, the former December 13, 1897, and the latter October 25, 1897.Both were buried in St. Nicholas Cemetery in Freedom township. Mrs. Mullen, who was the next to the oldest in a family of six children, was born September 24, 1853. Thirteen children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mullen: Thomas, who married Miss Marion Reed, of New London, now residing on a farm near that place; Patrick, single, living with his brother Thomas; John, an engineer on the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad, married Miss Anna Kavanough, of Kaukauna and resides at Wausau; Jeanette, who married Jacob Gengler, of Appleton, a traveling salesman for the J. R.Watkins Medical Company; Ellen, who married M. L. McCormick, a real estate dealer of Appleton, Wisconsin; Dora, formerly a school teacher, now married to Joseph Reed, of New London, and living on a farm near that place; William and C. Edwin, twins, both single, the former living at home and the latter a traveling salesman for the J. R. Watkins Medical Company, at Elkhart Lake, Wisconsin; Alice, formerly a school teacher, now a stenographer for M. L. McCormick, a real estate dealer of Appleton; Mary, residing at home; Elizabeth Margaret and Oliver Stephen, still at school.

Thomas J. Mullen bought the place where he now lives during the nine years that he was engaged in school teaching, and in 1879 engaged in farming the forty acres which he had secured. This property had about fifteen acres already improved, and boasted of a log house and log barn; at the present time it consists of 180 acres, of which 100 are under cultivation, and has a modern farm house, built in 1901, and a barn 36x100 feet, built in 1891, with a 24x36 wing, making one of the largest and most commodious barns in this section. He has also erected numerous outbuildings for the shelter of stock, grain and machinery, and has his property fenced with barbed and woven wire. He is engaged in general farming, and keeps Percheron horses, graded Guernsey cattle, as well as Polled Durham, and Poland-China hogs, his sheep being a mixture of Southdown-Lincolnshire and Lester rams, crossed with American De Lane ewes. Mr. Mullen is also engaged in dealing in real estate in this section to some extent. He is a Republican in politics, and has been clerk and treasurer of the school board and justice of the peace for several years. With his family he attends the Roman Catholic Church of Freedom township.

FRANK C. WENTINK, who for the past several years has been engaged in the retail meat business at No. 790 Lawe street, Appleton, as a member of the firm of Wentink-Steidl Company, is a son of Theodore and Margaret (Wirtz) Wentink, and was born in Appleton, May 1, 1888. Gerhardt Wentink, the paternal grandfather of Frank C., came to Port Washington, Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, in 1844, was a mason by trade, and had a family of seven sons and seven daughters. He was a native of Holland. Mr. Wentink's maternal grandfather, Frank Wirtz, was a native of Luxemburg, and was also a mason by trade, helping to build the first building in Appleton, whence he came in August, 1848. His daughter, Mary, was the first girl born in the city, and he had five other daughters and five sons. To Theodore and Margaret (Wirtz) Wentink there were born three children: May, who married George C. Steidl, Mr. Wentink's business partner; Herman L., who died at the age of six years; and Frank C. Frank C. Wentink received his education in the parochial schools of this city and Lawrence School of Commerce, and he learned the meat business in the market of his father, which the latter opened about 1881. At the time of his retirement from business activities, May 1, 1909, the firm of Wentink- Steidl Company was organized, and this association has continued to the present time. The two-story, frame building in which the business is located, at the corner of Lawe and Pacific streets, was erected by the elder Wentink, April 1, 1895. A general line of meats is carried, two delivery wagons are operated, and the phrase "Quality Meats," has become intimately associated with the name of this concern. The Wentink family is identified with St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and Frank C. Wentink is well known in Catholic fraternal circles, he being president of the St. Aloysius Young Men's Society, and a prominent member of the Knights of Columbus. In political matters he is a Democrat, and he is now a member of the Democratic State Committee.

GEORGE DEML, who is the proprietor of a flourishing meat market at No. 753 Richmond street, Appleton, is one of that city's progressive business citizens and self-made men. He was born April 8, 1871, in Center township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Peter and Catherine Deml, natives of Byrn, Regensberg, Germany, who came to Appleton in 1856 and took up wild land in Outagamie county. Peter Deml engaged in clearing his land for cultivating, and during the early days often carried his flour from Appleton on his back eight miles to his home. At the time of the outbreak of the Civil War, in 1860, he enlisted in the Union army, leaving his wife to take care of the five small children while he was away, and she bravely did her share in giving aid to the adopted country. Mr. and Mrs. Deml are still living, and are faithful members of the Catholic Church, attending St. Joseph's congregation at Appleton. Of their twelve children, seven are still alive. Mr. Deml is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. George Deml secured his education in the public schools at Center, and at the age of fourteen years left home and for some time worked at $5.00 per month, learning the meat business. He then worked in butcher shops in various parts of the state, and in 1893 came to Appleton and rented from Jacob Walter, who was the proprietor of a market in the Fifth Ward. Ten months later he built the building, a two-story frame structure, at No. 753 Richmond street, where he has since carried on a very successful business. Mr. Deml is a self-made man in every sense of the word, having started out upon his own resources and never depending upon any one else for assistance. He dates his start from the time when he shipped dressed calves to Chicago, and made such a success at this undertaking that he not only accumulated enough money to establish himself in business, but also gained the confidence necessary to embark in such a venture.

On January 23, 1895, Mr. Deml was united in marriage with Mary Wolf, of Clintonville, daughter of Valentine and Caroline (Rehl) Wolf, the former of whom is now the owner of an elevator at Sparta, Wisconsin. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Deml, namely: Catherine and Gladys, aged fifteen and ten years, respectively, at home; and two sons who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Deml are members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and he is connected with the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin and St. Joseph's Society.

WILLIAM B. BUTLER, who conducts the grocery establishment at No. 652 Richmond street, Appleton, is a product of the farm, having spent the time until he was thirty years of age in work on his father's property in Center township. Mr. Butler was born in Clyde, Sandusky county, Ohio, August 8, 1854, and is a son of Thomas and Mary (Dorsey) Butler, the former a native of the Emerald Isle, and the latter of the State of Vermont. Mr. Butler's father came to the United States as a young man, and first located in Ohio, where he was engaged in farming until 1858, and in that year brought his family to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, settling in Center township, where he carried on agricultural pursuits until his death, July 7, 1895. His first wife had died some years previously, leaving two children, and Mr. Butler had married, again, having thirteen children by this union. William B. Butler's education was secured in the public schools of Center township, and his boyhood and youth were spent much the same as the usual Outagamie farmer's son. At the age of thirty years he decided to give up tilling the soil, and subsequently found employment in machine shops in this section. He was careful with his earnings, and in 1894 he decided he had enough to embark in business on his own account, and his subsequent success testifies to the wisdom of his decision. His establishment, located at No. 652 Richmond street, is up-to-date in every way, and he has a full stock of staple and fancy groceries. His ability as a business man allows him to meet competition more than half way, and as a consequence his business has grown and is growing daily. On June 13, 1892, Mr. Butler was married to Ellen Calnin, of Center township, daughter of Patrick and Ellen (Barry) Calnin, pioneer farming people of Outagamie county, whence they came in 1848. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Butler, namely: Marie, Myrtle, Catherine, Lyda and Thomas. The whole family is connected with the Catholic Church, attending with St. Mary's congregation in Appleton, and Mr. Butler is a member of the Catholic Knights and the Catholic Order of Foresters. He takes an interest in political matters, but does not find time to engage actively, and is bound by no party ties, his votes being cast independently.

GEORGE SCHIEDERMEYER, one of Appleton's self-made business men, who has a business establishment at Nos. 1027-29 College avenue, where he handles a general line of hardware, bicycles, sporting goods and farming implements and machinery, was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 4, 1861, a son of George and Thekla Schiedermeyer, both of whom died in the old country. George Schiedermeyer was twenty years of age when he came to the United States, having received his education and learned the tinner's trade in this country. He followed that occupation in Appleton until 1892, and then opened a store at No. 1015 College avenue, two years later moving to No. 1017, and in 1900 erecting his present handsome two-story structure at Nos. 1027-29 College avenue, which has a forty-eight-foot front and eighty-foot depth. He caters to the best trade in Appleton, and has built up a large and steadily growing business. In 1883, Mr. Schiedermeyer was united in marriage with Josephine Zickler, of Appleton, and they have had six children, one of whom is deceased, while the survivors are as follows: Josephine, who married William Greinke, of Appleton; George D., a member of the Catholic Knights, who is engaged in business with his father; Max Walter, also in business with his father, and a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters, married Bertha Mann; Hulda C. and Elsie F., the latter two residing at home with their father. Mr. Schiedermeyer and his family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church at Appleton, and he is a member of St. Joseph's Society. He has been a hard worker all of his life, and the success that he has attained in his business venture is a result of this unrelenting perseverance and a natural business ability. Mr. Schiedermeyer is not a politician, having found that his private matters demand all of his time and attention.

JOSEPH J. PLANK, president of the firm of Joseph J. Plank & Company, of Appleton, manufacturing dandy rolls and specializing in artistic watermarking used in papermaking, and one of the leading young business men of this city, was born in Brillion, Wisconsin, December 30, 1881, a son of Ferdinand and Sybilla (Trier) Plank, the former a native of Germany and the latter of Sheboygan, Wisconsin. Ferdinand Plank came to the United States in boyhood, his family locating in Brillion, Calumet county, and in 1883 came to Appleton, where he worked as a miller until becoming foreman of Marshall & Hamel's mill. His wife died in 1904. Joseph J. Plank was the only child of his parents, and his education was secured in St. Joseph's Parochial school and the Ryan High school. After leaving the latter institution he worked for a time for Petti-- bone and Peabody, and then entered the screen plate factory of the Appleton Screen Plate Company in Appleton, continuing with this concern for seven years, and having charge of the dandy roll department. In November, 1908, Mr. Plank established the Joseph J. Plank & Company factory for the manufacture of dandy rolls and watermarking, and the business has grown to such an extent that the firm now employs fifteen specialists and occupies a building 24x84 feet, two stories high, on Clark street, near the Northwestern depot, and the building is to be extended to 300 feet sometime in the future. Mr. Plank has patented a special roll of his own which has many advantages over the common type. The product of the company is sold all over the United States, and the company bears the reputation of being one of the most substantial in their line in the United States. The company intends, in the near future, to go more extensively into the manufacturing of paper mill specialties and will then employ about fifty men. On August 29, 1906, Mr. Plank was united in marriage with Miss Henrietta Kamps, the estimable daughter of Gerhardt and Sophia (Baumann) Kamps, and three children have been born to this union: Gertrude, Sybilla and William Joseph. The Plank family is connected with St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and Mr. Plank is a member of St. Joseph's Society, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Catholic Knights and the Knights of Columbus.

HENRY SCHNEIDER, whose carpenter and contracting shop has been situated on Johnston street, Appleton, since 1880, is one of the old, reliable business men of this city, and has been a resident here since 1866. He was born in Hesse, Germany, October 19, 1842, a son of Conrad and Catherine Schneider, both of whom spent their lives in the Fatherland. Henry Schneider came to the United States in 1860, and shortly thereafter went to Canada, but in 1866 returned to this country and settled in St. Louis. He remained there but a short time, and during the same year came to Appleton, where he has been engaged in carpentering and contracting ever since. He has employed as many as fifteen men at a time, and has erected some of the large and important buildings in this city as well as having done much contract work beyond the city limits. On June 10, 1869, Mr. Schneider was married to Mary Gassman, who had come to the United States when she was seven years old, and they had the following children: Mrs. F. M. Bloom, a resident of Butternut, Wisconsin; Cornelia E., residing at home; Henry C., who is living in Beloit, Wisconsin; Alma D., residing at Butternut; William K., a resident of Evansville, Wisconsin, a bookkeeper for a large manufacturing company; and Thusnelda M. and Hortense E., residing at home, both being teachers. Five of his children were given high school educations by Mr. Schneider, and Henry C. spent four years in the state university at Madison, and has the degree of M. E. The family belongs to the Congregational Church. Mr. Schneider has been a member of the Odd Fellows fraternity for forty-two years, and is also well known in the Sons of Hermann, with which he has been connected since 1876. He is considered one of the solid men of his community, and during his residence here has made many warm friends and appreciative acquaintances.

JAMES A. WOOD, president and treasurer of the firm of Potts, Wood & Company, at Appleton, Wisconsin, wholesale dealers in milk and cream, and the largest concern of its kind in Wisconsin, was born in Eau Claire county, Wisconsin, October 30, 1869, a son of Daniel and Nancy (Prince) Wood, the former a native of New York and the latter of Maine. They were married in Wisconsin, Daniel Wood being an agriculturist of Eau Claire county, and in their later years moved to Appleton, where Mr. Wood died and where his widow still survives. James A. Wood was the fourth of his parents' family of six children, and his early education was secured in the public schools of his native county. In 1896 he graduated from Lawrence University, and he at once entered into the creamery business. In 1898, the firm of Potts, Wood & Company was organized by G. L. Potts, J. A. Wood and Clara A. Gerry since which time Mr. Potts has died, and Mr. Wood is now president and treasurer, Louis Sager being secretary of the company.Two creameries are located in the country and one in the City of Appleton, and the firm ships more cream than any firm in the state, most of its trade being with nmanufacturers of ice cream. Wholesale trade is catered to exclusively, and twelve men are employed. About 9,000,000 pounds of milk are handled yearly. Mr. Potts was the inventor of the first successful Pasteurizing machine to be put on the market, and the company has since sold the invention. These machines are being sold all over the country.

On September 9, 1896, Mr. Wood was married to Effie Gerry, daughter of George W. and Clara Gerry, early settlers of Appleton, where Mr. Gerry was engaged in the lumber business. Four children have been born to this union: George, Edith, Winifred and Henry. Mr. and Mrs. Wood are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is a member of the Masons and the Knights of Pythias, and is treasurer of Lawrence University.

E. J. MORROW, who is successfully engaged in business at Appleton, Wisconsin, as one of the proprietors of the Appleton Tea and Coffee Company, was born February 16, 1878, in Menasha, Wisconsin, a son of William and Mary (Quinn) Morrow, and a grandson of James Morrow, who came from Ireland and became an early settler of Outagamie county, was engaged actively in politics, dealt extensively in lumber and was the father of a family of seven girls and five boys. William Morrow, who is now living retired in Appleton, had two sons: E. J., and William, the latter born June 10, 1880. E. J. Morrow received a good publie school education and also attended St. Mary's Catholic school, and as a young man worked for the Chicago Record-Herald, where he soon rose to the office of State collector of Wisconsin. After severing his connections with this newspaper he traveled on the road for a few years, and in March, 1903, with his brother, who had also been a traveling man they formed a partnership with Michael Garvey, called the Appleton Tea and Coffee Company. The company's store is located at No. 937 College avenue, and handles a full line of teas, coffees, spices and china, operates four wagons and gives attention to a trade that resides within a radius of forty or more miles of Appleton. That this concern is the largest in its line in the city is due to the conscientious efforts and business ability of the brothers, who are not only good business men and public-spirited citizens, but men whose friendship is valued by a wide circle of acquaintances. They are consistent members of St. Mary's Catholic Church, which they have attended since boyhood, and both vote the Democratic ticket although they have been too busy in a business way to engage actively in politics.

EMANUEL HAHN, who has been a resident of Seymour for the past thirty years and is now living retired from business activities, is a native of Wisconsin, having been born in Manitowoc county, September 10, 1854, and is a son of William and Mary (Beckner) Hahn. The parents of Mr. Hahn were born in Slasing, Germany, where Mrs. Hahn was first married to a Mr. Gierstorf, by whom she had two children: Annie and Joe, the latter of whom served three years as a private of Company I, Twenty-seventh Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and is now a resident of Nebraska. The family was established in the United States in about 1850 when Mr. and Mrs. Hahn settled in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, and there their three sons: William, Fred and Emanuel, were born. In 1856 they moved to Sheboygan county, and after the Civil War Mr. Hahn secured a farm, on which he worked up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1903 when he was eighty years of age. Mrs. Hahn died in 1901, when she had reached the age of eighty-one years.

Emanuel Hahn secured his education in the public schools of Sheboygan county, and when twenty-one years of age struck out for himself. He worked out during the summers and in the winters remained at home until 1882, in which year he came to Seymour and during the eighteen years following was engaged in sawmill work. He then for six years was associated with the Muehl Furniture Company, and at the end of that period he practically retired from activities of a business nature.

Mr. Hahn was married to Elizabeth Straub, who is also a native of Wisconsin, and to them there have been born four children, namely: Walter, who married Martha Berger; Gertrude, who lives at home with her parents; Jacob, who is employed as bookkeeper at the First National Bank; and Lavina who was married to George Tubbs.

FRED DOROW, mayor of Seymour, Wisconsin, is serving in his third term in the office of the chief executive of the city. He is a native of the Fatherland, having been born in Pomar, Germany, September 26, 1852, and is a son of Fred and Sophia (Balfous) Dorow, who came to America in 1869 with their four children: Charles, Hettie, Minnie and Fred. They started for the United States, but the mother died in Montreal, Canada, where the family was held in quarantine, and the two sisters went into a Catholic institute. Fred Dorow was sick for three months, and when he had fully recovered the family came on to Black Wolf, in Winnebago county, Wisconsin, where they resided for five years. They then removed to Fond du Lac county and for twenty-three years lived at Taycheedah, where the eldest sister died. The father passed away in Seymour in 1905.

About the year 1896 Fred Dorow became identified with the Walters Brewing Conpany, at Appleton, Wisconsin, and he was also for some years interested in the cold storage business. He has now retired from business activities, but holds directorships in the First National Bank and the Seymour Loan and Trust Company. His political views are those of the Republican party, which has sent him three times to the mayoralty chair.

Mr. Dorow was married to Minnie Ziesemer, a native of the Fatherland and a daughter of Fred Ziesemer, who came to the United States during the same year as the Dorow family. He died in 1909, at the age of ninety-six years. Two children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Dorow, namely: Emma, who is bookkeeper for the Kuehne Company, of Seymour, and resides at home; and Bertha, who married August Koepp and resides at Warsaw, Wisconsin.

WILLIAM SCHMIDT, who owns one of the many farms in Black Creek township that has been claimed from the wild land by members of the same family and has never left their hands from the time it was purchased from the original holders, is engaged in extensive operations on section 33, where he is known as a good, practical farmer and representative citizen. Born April 1, 1876, in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, he is a son of John and Marie Schmidt, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1865 and settled at Milwaukee, Wisconsin. After fifteen years they came to Outagamie county and bought eighty acres of the place now owned by their son William, which was then all wild timber and brush land, uncultivated and unbroken. A small frame house and barn were built, and in these the parents spent the remainder of their lives, the father dying in 1900, aged sixty-nine years, and the mother in 1908, when seventy-one.

William Schmidt was the youngest of his parents' four children, and his education was secured in the district schools of his native vicinity. He remained on the home farm, assisting his parents, until the spring of 1898, when he was married to Miss Clara Brandt, who was born May 4, 1876, the third of the eight children of Joseph and Minnie (Plamann) Brandt, natives of Germany, who came to America in early life and are now living in the village of Black Creek. After marriage, Mr. Schmidt bought out the interests of the other heirs to the family homestead, and he has been living here ever since. He has added to the improvements on the place, and has 100 acres of the 120 under cultivation, the property being well and thoroughly fenced with barbed and woven wire, and the buildings in the finest of repair. He has farmed along general lines and raised a good quality of sheep, hogs and cattle, and has met with satisfactory success in his undertakings. In political matters he is a Republican, and he has served six years as a member of the school board and twelve years as overseer of roads. He and Mrs. Schmidt are members of St. Patrick's Lutheran Church of Black Creek township. Their five children, all of whom reside at home, are as follows: Arthur, Edna, Melvin, Mildred and Raymond.

JOHN M. FASSBENDER, one of the influential citizens of Black Creek township, who for the past ten years has been engaged in agricultural pursuits on section 28, has also been prominently identified with public matters in the township for a long period and has held numerous positions of honor and trust in the gift of his fellowtownsmen. Born December 11, 1867, in Ellington township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, Mr. Fassbender is a son of Peter and Elizabeth (Nettekoven) Fassbender, natives of Prussia, Germany, who came to this country in childhood and were married in Milwaukee county. After their marriage they came to Outagamie county and settled on sixty acres of raw land in Ellington township, Mr. Fassbender's equipment at this time being a team of oxen, a breaking plow, a three-cornered drag and a wagon. Seven or eight years later he secured horses and as time went on he made improvements, purchasing modern machinery a piece at a time until he was finally the possessor of a proper equipment with which to cultivate his land. He lived there from 1860 until 1901, in the meantime adding eighty acres to the original tract, and at this time had all of the land with the exception of five acres of wooded land under cultivation. He built a modern house in 1880 and a basement barn, 78x36 feet, in 1881, and in 1902 sold the property to his son, who now lives on it. Mr. and Mrs. Fassbender are now living retired at Appleton, the father being seventy-four years old and the mother seventy-three.

John M. Fassbender was sixteen years of age when he commenced working in various cheese factories, and he continued to be so occupied until he was twenty-three years of age, when he embarked in the business himself, conducting a factory for five years. He then went to Appleton, where the next five years were spent in various occupations, and in 1902 he bought the farm he now occupies, which he has continued to operate until the present time. Since then he has refenced the entire place with barbed and woven wire, reroofed all the buildings and remodeled the barn, putting in cement floors and stanchions and making it modern and up-to-date with cattle-watering system and other improvements, and its dimensions are now 102x36 feet. In addition to the eighty acres on which he lives, he owns ten acres of timber land in section 19. He carries on general farming and stock raising, marketing dairy products, hogs and cattle, and is a breeder of registered Holstein cattle. He has twelve milch cows and uses Percheron horses in the operation of his land. Mr. Fassbender is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. In politics he is a Republican, and he is chairman of the board of health, has been treasurer of the school board for six years, served three years as township clerk, from 1904 to 1907, and was road commissioner nine years and justice of the peace for six years. He is treasurer of the Twelve Corners and Mackville Telephone Company, and is a stockholder therein. Mr. Fassbender and his family are connected with the Roman Catholic Church.

In 1895, Mr. Fassbender was married to Miss Anna Siegert, who was born April 8, 1865, the eldest of the nine children of Gottfried and Matilda (Lute) Siegert, natives of Germany who came to America with their parents as young people. Mr. Siegert enlisted in 1861, from Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, in Company I, 32d Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and after his service to his country was completed, he went to Greenville township, Outagamie county, where he was engaged in farming. He retired from farming activities in 1909, and he and his wife are now residents of Appleton. Mr. and Mrs. Fassbender have had nine children: Herbert, Arthur, Raymond, Clarence, Margaret, Adelia, Florence, Walter and Irene, all living at home.

HENRY SEDO, one of the enterprising and progressive agriculturists of Outagamie county, who is engaged in cultivating a fine tract of eighty acres situated in section 33, Black Creek township, was born April 11, 1859, in New York State, a son of Christian and Annie (Koerner) Sedo, natives of Germany. Shortly after their marriage in the Fatherland, the parents of Mr. Sedo came to America and settled in New York State, but after five or six years decided to try their fortunes in the West, and subsequently came to Wisconsin, settling in Center township, Outagamie county. Here the death of the mother occurred in the spring of 1906, when she was 69 years old, and the father came to live with his son Henry, and died in 1908, aged eighty-four years. Henry Sedo was the second of a family of six children, and he was only fifteen years old when he began working for wages at various occupations. He continued to do so until he was married, in the fall of 1884, to Sophia Buchholtz, born April 24, 1865, the fourth of a family of nine children born to her parents. Mrs. Sedo's mother is now living in Appleton, a widow, Mr. Buchholtz having died in 1908. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Sedo, namely: Gustave, who is married and living in Center township; Anna, who married Henry Stecker, by whom she has had two children, living in Appleton; and Christine, Laura, Clara and Mabelle, all single and residing at home.

After his marriage, Mr. Sedo bought the property on which he now resides, and he has put sixty acres under a high state of cultivation. He put in all of the improvements, including a modern home, large barn and outbuildings, and has his property well-fenced, graded and drained. General farming and stockraising have been his occupations, and his principal products for the markets are dairy staples and hogs. He is independent in political matters and has never cared to hold public office. With his family he attends the Lutheran Church.

ALLEN A. FRASER, who owns and operates a large lumber yard and planing mill at Appleton, Wisconsin, is one of the successful self-made men of that city. He has been a life-long resident of Appleton, where he was born November 23, 1872, a son of Hugh and Evelyn (Fish) Fraser, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of Jefferson county, New York. Hugh Fraser came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, in 1861, and during the remainder of his life was engaged in agricultural pursuits, dying December 9, 1903, while his widow still survives. Seven children were born to this couple: Jessie, who married Louis Tachman, a resident of Outagamie county; Allen A.; Nellie; Sadie, who married Harlow Brown, a resident of Alberta, Canada; Hugh, engaged with Allen A. in business; Warren, who is deceased; and Edward, who is also engaged in business with Allen A. The latter received his education in the public schools of Appleton, and as a young man learned the carpenter trade, starting contracting on April 17, 1903. In April, 1910, he opened the lumber yard and planing mill, and in addition to operating these he does general contracting, having met with unqualified success. His office and storage building is 48x80 feet and is two stories in height, steam power being used in operating the machinery and twenty-nine men being employed. Mr. Fraser has handled some large contracts, notable among which may be mentioned the chapel at the Riverside Cemetery, and the dormitory at Lawrence College, the latter piece of work being done in 1911. On June 30, 1896, Mr. Fraser was married to Carrie Metthes, of Appleton, daughter of John Metthes, and they have had five children. Mr. Fraser is a member of the Odd Fellows, the Modern Woodmen of America, and the Eagles, in all of which he is immensely popular.

PETER FASSBENDER, who is a well-known retired resident of Appleton, was for a long period intimately connected with the agricultural interests of Outagamie county, where he also founded one of the largest business enterprises of its kind in this part of Wisconsin. He was born in a village in the province of Koeln, Germany, in 1838, and is the only survivor of three children born to John and Salome Fassbender, the former of whom died in 1843 in Germany, leaving three children, of whom Peter is the only survivor. Mrs. Fassbender was later married to Matt Tennessen, and in 1856 the family came to the United States, locating in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, where Mr. Tennessen purchased eighty acres of wild land, and the remainder of his life was spent on this farm, where Mrs. Tennessen also died. They had eight children, of whom five survive. Peter Fassbender received a common school education in Germany, and early in life began to display those attributes of character that marked his whole life. As a youth he worked energetically on his step-father's farm, and when he had attained his majority he began working for others by the month. In 1862 he was married and during the following year he came to Outagamie county and purchased sixty acres of land on section 25, Ellington township, and after clearing it and putting it in a state of cultivation, he bought forty acres in section 26, in 1868, and in 1883 bought forty acres in section 24. In 1887 he built a cheese factory on section 26, which he conducted until 1901, which had a capacity of 11,000 pounds of milk per day, and he kept twenty-four cows and purchased milk from other farmers in his neighborhood. In 1901 he sold his farm to his second son Joe P., and moved to Appleton, and at the same time sold the cheese factory to his third son, Hubert, who rebuilt on section 25, in a large stone building, and who now conducts one of the largest creameries and cheese factories in the county. On November 26, 1862, Mr. Fassbender was married to Elizabeth Nettecoven, born in Germany, daughter of Henry Nettecoven who brought his family to the United States in 1845, settling near Milwaukee, where Mr. Nettecoven was engaged in cultivating a sixty-acre farm all of his life. Nine children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Fassbender, three of whom died in infancy, while the survivors are: Annie, residing at home; John M., a farmer of Black Creek township; Joseph P., farmer, residing on the Ellington township farm on section 26; Hubert, who is conducting the cheese factory; Elizabeth, widow of Peter Ellenbecker, who resides with her father and has two children; and Henry F., who is the owner of a creamery and cheese factory at Hollandtown. The Fassbender family is connected with St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and Mr. Fassbender is a member of the Catholic Knights.

FRED PETERSEN, deceased, who for more than a quarter of a century had lived retired in Appleton, died in that city January 6, 1908. He was a native of Germany, and was born in 1832, a son of Fred and Wilhelmina (Rates) Petersen, natives of the Fatherland, where the mother died. Mr. Petersen came to the United States in his later years, and died three years after his arrival. Fred Petersen came to the United States in 1850, and first located in Milwaukee, but after a short residence there moved to Outagamie county and bought land in Clayton township. After he had cleared up a good property from the timber he sold his interests and located in Appleton, engaging in the meat business, in which he was engaged until his retirement in 1882. Mr. Petersen was married January 15, 1859, to Mary J. Zeh, born in Germany, June 6, 1839, daughter of Henry and Christina (Fichtelman) Zeh, who came to the United States in 1846. Mrs. Petersen's father died while crossing the ocean, but his widow and children landed in this country after a voyage of nine weeks, and the mother purchased twenty acres of land near Milwaukee, this being operated by her children. There were eight children in her family, and at that time the oldest was nineteen years of age and the youngest only three years old. Mr. and Mrs. Petersen had a family of eight children: Fred, of Appleton; Henry, a resident of Minneapolis, in the insurance business; Annie, at home; William, a resident of Chicago; Mary, living in California; Minnie, a school teacher of Milwaukee; Pauline, also a teacher in Milwaukee; and Alvina, who married Fred Zabler of California. Mrs. Petersen and her children are members of the Congregational Church. Mr. Petersen was a member of the Odd Fellows and the A. O. U. W., and was a prominent public man, serving as township treasurer and supervisor in Center township for many years.

GERHARD KAMPS, deceased. Prominent among the business citizens of Appleton, Wsisconsin, was the late Gerhard Kamps, in whose death, September 4, 1895, the city sustained a severe loss. He was born October 8, 1833, at Menslen, Kreis Moers, R. B. Dusseldorf, R. P. Preussen, Germany, received a common school education and learned the saddlery business. He entered the Prussian army in 1853, and served as a lancer in the Fifth Uhlanen Regiment a little over three years, receiving an honorable discharge from the King of Prussia. In 1860 he came to America with his parents, locating first in Calumet county, Wisconsin, and March 8, 1861, he came to Appleton and engaged in the harness and saddlery business, in which he was engaged until the time of his retirement, April 1, 1894. On July 4, 1861, he was married to Katherina Jansen, who was born December 19, 1841, at Zifflich, Kreis Cleve, Prussia, Germany, a daughter of Herman and Helena (Bomkamp) Jansen, and seven children were born to this union: John Henry, who is deceased; Helen, wife of John J. Sherman; Herman A.; Agnes, who is deceased, was the wife of H. Reuter; Theodore E., a resident of Appleton; and Everhard and Catherina, who died in infancy. The mother of these children died April 20, 1872, and Mr. Kamps was married (second) January 21, 1873, to Sophia. Baumann, who was born December 13, 1849, at Alpen, Germany. Seven children were born to this union, as follows: William F., who is cashier of the Outagamie County Bank; Richard G. and Catherine, who are deceased; Etta, who married J. J. Plank; Gretchen A., living at home; and two who died in infancy. Mr. Kamp was one of the original directors of the Citizens' Bank, and for twenty-five years was successfully engaged in the hide and leather business. The family is connected with St. Joseph's congregation of the Roman Catholic Church, and Mr. Kamps held membership in the Catholic Knights.

JOHN COURTLAND SCHLOSSER, deceased, who for many years, was a well-known figure in the coal and wood trade in Appleton, Wisconsin, was one of the city's self-made men. He was born in Meldrorf, Germany, in 1848, and at the age of twenty years came to the United States. At this time his circumstances were in such poor shape that he was compelled to travel from New York to Appleton with nothing to eat, and he arrived in this city without a cent in his pockets. Nothing daunted, however, he secured employment as a barber, and in a comparatively short time had a business of his own, disposing of this to embark in a hardware business, and later entered the coal and wood business, with which he was connected during the remainder of his life. His death occurred December 7, 1908. He was an ardent and active Republican, and for thirty-five years was a member of the Masonic fraternity. On

March 30, 1878, Mr. Schlosser was united in marriage with Miss Pauline Bielenberg, daughter of Henry and Emily (Petersen) Bielenberg, who came to Appleton in 1866, Mr. Bielenberg being engaged in painting until his death in 1893. Mrs. Bielenberg now makes her home with Mrs. Schlosser. Mr. and Mrs. Schlosser had seven children, as follows: Emily, widow of Emil Koerner, residing at St. Paul, Minnesota, has one daughter; Leila, residing at Billings, Montana, married Bert Harwood; Edward, residing at Forest City, Arkansas, is operating a box factory; John H., superintendent of a mill in Arkansas; Laura, living with her mother; Fred, who is connected with the Commercial Bank in Appleton; and one child who died in infancy. The family is connected with the Congregational Church.

LEWIS MILES EDMONDS, deceased, who during a long and active career was a minister of the Methodist Church, preached in Michigan for more than forty years and filled several pastorates in Wisconsin,his death occurring at Wausau in the latter state, March 13, 1910. He was born February 6, 1832, a son of Jonathan W. and Emeline (Dodge) Edmonds, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of New York. Jonathan Edmonds was a shoemaker by trade, living in New York for several years, and moved from there to Illinois and later to Clinton, Iowa, where his death occurred. Lewis M. Edmonds secured his early educational training in the schools of New York, and later graduated from Casinovia College, Albion, Michigan. He began preaching before he had left College, and for two years was located at Bethany, New York, then joining the Michigan Methodist Episcopal conference, and from 1857 was connected therewith in Michigan for forty years, serving as presiding elder for a term and building the churches at Mason, Paw Paw, Scotts and Charlotte, Michigan, in addition to raising funds for the building of other churches. In 1897 he moved from Michigan to Wisconsin, locating at Oconto Falls, and later preached at Gillette and Brokaw. On September 1, 1858, Rev. Edmonds was married to Mary Esther Thorpe, daughter of J. J. and Margery (Osgood) Thorpe, natives of Ohio who moved to Michigan in 1837, Mr. Thorpe being a manufacturer with large lumber interests. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Edmonds, namely: Mrs. Brokaw, of Appleton; W. L., a manufacturer of paper at Wausau; George Thorpe, who died at the age of six years; E. A., of Appleton; Miss May, who lives at home with her mother; and Dr. F. J., who is residing at Shawano.

WILLIAM D. AMES, deceased, whose death occurred in November, 1898, at Appleton, was living retired after many years of labor as a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was born at Pittsford, New York, October 25, 1832, a son of Henry and Anna E. (Wheeler) Eames, the former of Massachusetts and the latter of New York. The family was founded in this country by Thomas Eames, who came from England to Massachusetts in 1630. Henry Eames was an early settler of Michigan, and here he and his brothers dropped the letter "e" from the surname, though it is still retained by the family in Massachusetts. William D. Ames received his education in the schools of Hudson, Mich., and later he attended Garrett Biblical Institute, at Evanston, Illinois. From 1859 until 1895 he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal ministry, most of this time being spent in Wisconsin. He had charges at Hartford, Menasha, Grand Rapids, Stevens Point, Edgerton and Fox Lake, besides many other pastorates, and in 1884 he organized the Kaukauna Church. In 1895 he retired from activities and located in Appleton, where his death occurred in November, 1898. He was married in August, 1857, to Martha Jane, daughter of Asahel and Mary Bailey, of Sun Prairie, Wisconsin. His wife died in 1863, leaving a daughter, Mary, who married Julius Leidenberg and resides at Shawano, Wisconsin. He was married again in December, 1864, to Abbie Fellows, daughter of Joseph and Marian (Marks) Fellows, of De Peyster, New York, who came to Wisconsin in 1846. They settled in Kenosha county, where Mr. Fellows, who was a carpenter by trade, became a successful farmer. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Ames, as follows: J. W. T., superintendent of the high school at River Falls; Dr. E. R., of Knoxville, Iowa; Edith A. and Alberta E., who are engaged in teaching school in Appleton; Eva, who married Arthur Hansen of Chicago; Ernest W.; and one child who died in infancy. During three months of the Civil War, Mr. Ames was chaplain of the Forty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, and throughout his life he was a popular comrade of the Grand Army of the Republic. He also held membership in the Odd Fellows and the Masons.

THOMAS DAY, deceased. Thomas Day, one of the pioneer citizens of Outagamie county, whose death occurred April 6, 1889, was a native of Ireland, and came to the United States when he was twenty-one years of age. He was married in Philadelphia in 1850, and in that year came to Outagamie county, settling in Ellington township, where he purchased wild land and started to make himself a home. Clearing the land from the timber, he soon put it in a state of cultivation, and at the time of his death he was the owner of 120 acres of excellent land. Mr. Day was married to Bridget Durrick, daughter of Matthew and Catherine (Craynor) Durrick, early settlers of Philadelphia, and they had a family of twelve children, as follows: Matthew, a railroad engineer of Antigo, Wisconsin; William, a farmer of Outagamie county; Elizabeth, who was a professional nurse; Edward, a conductor of Brainerd, Minnesota; Mary, who married N. Kelley, a resident of South Dakota; Anna, a professional nurse; Celia, who married Alfred Decker, of Chilton, Wisconsin; Thomas, a fireman of Appleton; Emma, who married B. F. Newcomb, a resident of Appleton; Morris and Julia, living with their mother; and John, a resident of Duluth, Minnesota. The family is connected with St. Mary's Catholic Church, and the boys are members of the Catholic Knights, the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Knights of Columbus. Mr. Day was one of those who assisted materially in the growth and development of Outagamnie county, and he was always known as a progressive and practical citizen and first class agriculturist.

WALTER M. RUSSELL, one of Appleton's highly respected retired citizens, who established the first exclusive hardware store in the city, was engaged in business here for a number of years. Mr. Russell is a native of New Hampshire, born June 7, 1830, son of Ephriam and Martha (Meriam) Russell, natives of that State, where Ephraim Russell died. His widow came to Wisconsin in her later years and passed away here. Walter M. Russell secured his education and grew to manhood in New Hampshire, and in June, 1855, came to Appleton, establishing himself in the hardware business in partnership with a Mr. Galpin. After this connection had continued for some years, Mr. Russell disposed of his interest in the business and became associated with A. A. Babcock, with whom he remained until 1883, and then went to Plankinton, South Dakota, at which place he made his residence until 1907, and then returned to Appleton, where he has since lived retired. He bought a comfortable residence, and is now enjoying the fruits of his long years of business activities. Although advanced in years, Mr. Russell is still hale and hearty and in possession of his faculties, and he can look back over a long and useful life. In 1856, Mr. Russell was married to Miss Cornelia Hillard, in Rome, New York, and to this union there were born five children, of whom four are still living, as follows: Charles, who resides at Humbird, Wisconsin; Nellie, who married M. D. Packard and makes her home in Oshkosh; Frank and Ray, residing in Fond du Lac. Mrs. Russell died in Appleton March, 1873, and in November, 1873, Mr. Russell married Anna Wilder, and to this union were born four children: Winnifred, who resides at home; Archie, of Sturgis, South Dakota; Merrian, who died while Mr. Russell was residing at Plankinton, S. D., and Hazel, who resides at home. James and Merrian are deceased. Mr. Russell attends the First Church of Christ, Scientist, in Appleton. Although not actively engaged in politics, he takes a keen interest in local matters, and gives his influence to those candidates whom his judgment tells him will labor best in behalf of the community.

WILLIAM M. HOYT, resident manager of The Union Bag and Paper Company, one of the largest business enterprises of its kind in Wisconsin, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 16, 1879, and is a son of P. D. and Agnes O. Hoyt, who in 1880 located in Geneva, Illinois, where P. D. Hoyt, who was a glucose and starch manufacturer, died in 1903. William.M. Hoyt received his education in the schools of Geneva, and in 1899 came to Kaukauna as clerk for the company of which he is now manager, having been appointed to the latter position October 1, 1903. Mr. Hoyt is well known Kaukauna, and is a member of the Elks and Masonic fraternities. The mill property now occupied by The Union Bag and Paper Company was originally built in 1882 by Colonel H. A. Frambach and his half-brother, John Stovekin, and was burned twice, the last time in 1888, and it has passed through the hands of the Frambach Paper Company, the Kaukauna Paper Company, the Van Nortwick Paper Company, and the Western Paper Bag Company, which latter concern acquired it in 1892. In 1899 this firm sold out to The Union Bag and Paper Company, and during the following year the latter company moved from Batavia, Illinois, where it had been formerly located, to Kaukuana, and added another story to the structure, also building two warehouses, the factory now covering a floor space of 138,000 square feet in the main buildings, besides owning a large boiler house, barn and smaller buildings. The water power used amounts to 1660 horse-power, and they have auxiliary steam engines of 400 horse-power. The product of the company is shipped west of Ohio and the Great Lakes. One hundred and forty people are employed in manufacturing seven tons of ground wood pulp and the output of the factory, which manufactures twenty-five tons of paper daily and has a capacity of 4,000,000 bags per diem. All grades and sizes of paper bags are made.

OSBORN G. LORD, M. D., dean of the medical profession in Kaukauna, Wisconsin, and the first physician to practice in this city, has been known to the citizens of Kaukauna for nearly forty years, during which time he has had the full confidence and esteem of his fellow-townsmen. Born at Porter, Maine, December 1, 1845, Dr. Lord is a son of Levi and Louise (Merrifield) Lord, and a member of a family that located in New England during Colonial days. Dr. Lord is a graduate of Bowdoin Medical College, Brunswick, Maine, and came to Appleton, Wisconsin, in 1871, practicing there six months and then coming to Kaukauna, March 15, 1872. He has carried on a general practice here ever since, and his skill in his profession has been demonstrated in many complicated cases, while his kindly, genial personality has endeared him to his patients and made him friend and adviser as well as family physician. Dr. Lord was married in 1870 to Clara D. Lougee, of Parsonsfield, Maine, and she died in August, 1872, Dr. Lord marrying again in 1875 Mrs. Clark, formerly Sarah E. Hale, a native of Ohio. One child was born to this union: Laura, who married John Meyers and resides in Janesville.

WILLIAM N. NOLAN, M. D., city physician of Kaukauna, Wisconsin, and one of the leading members of the Outagamie medical profession, is a native of this county, having been born in the city of Appleton, in 1870, a son of Andrew and Sarah (O'Hare) Nolan. Andrew Nolan, who was a native of Ireland, came to Wisconsin in 1847, and was here married to Sarah O'Hare, who was born in Vermont and brought by her parents to Neenah, Wisconsin, in 1846. Andrew Nolan was a carpenter by trade, but after following that occupation for some years bought wild land in Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, and the remainder of his life was spent in agricultural pursuits. He became one of the leading farmers of his section, and at the time of his death, in 1901, was the owner of an excellent property. His widow survived him five years, passing away in 1906. William N. Nolan received a public and high school education at Appleton, and then went to Chicago, where he attended Rush Medical College, graduating from that well known institution in 1894. In the same year he engaged in practice in Kaukauna, where he soon advanced to the front ranks of his profession. He is now acting as city physician of Kaukauna, and has also been prominently identified with civic affairs, serving several terms as alderman. He holds membership in the Kaukauna Medical Association, the Fox River Valley Medical Association, the county, State and national organizations, and he is also a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters. In 1901, Dr. Nolan was united in marriage with Mamie Sullivan, of Kaukauna daughter of Michael and Nora Sullivan, early settlers of this State. Dr. and Mrs. Nolan are consistent members of the Catholic Church.

HOTEL LASALLE. One of the leading hostelries of Kaukauna, and one that is much patronized by the traveling public, is this well known house, the proprietor of which, Michael H. Niesen, is one of that city's most popular citizens. The Hotel LaSalle was built in 1905, by Captain D. J. Brothers, one of the first white men to come to Kaukauna, and was erected by him to perpetuate his memory in the minds of those who came after. This famous stand has changed hands a number of times, and on April 1, 1910, Mr. Niesen took charge of its affairs. It is of solid brick construction, has thirty-eight rooms, and its ample dining room seats 100 guests. Michael H. Niesen was born October 1, 1878, in Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, son of Hubert and Catherine (Wolf) Niesen, natives of Wisconsin. Mr. Niesen's father moved to Kaukauna June 23, 1881, and has followed the trade of millwright here ever since, having helped to build mills on the Fox River during the past thirty years, as well as on the Wisconsin River. He is well known in this business and enjoys an enviable reputation for integrity and probity. Mr. Niesen and his wife were members of the Catholic Church and were the parents of seven children, all of whom survive. Michael H. Niesen received his education in the schools of Kaukauna, after leaving which he was for some time engaged in railroad work. He then entered the retail liquor business, and in 1910 became proprietor of the Hotel LaSalle, which he has brought up to a high standard of excellence. Mr. Niesen was married June 9, 1908, to Ida Ortleib, of Chilton, Wisconsin. They are members of Holy Cross Catholic Church. He is a member of the Foresters, of which he has been district secretary since its organization, and he also holds membership in the Fraternal Order of Eagles, acting in the capacity of treasurer of that order, a position he has held since the lodge was started in Kaukauna. Mr. Niesen is very public-spirited, and he has found time from his business interests to serve his city as alderman and as a member of the fire and police commission, and he now holds the latter office.

FRANK C. BABCOCK, D. D. S., a leading member of Outagamie county's dental profession, who is engaged in an extensive practice in the city of Kaukauna, was born in Appleton, Wisconsin, in 1875, and is a son of A. A. and Louise (Tompkins) Babcock, the former a native of Vermont and the latter of New York. Adelbert Babcock, the grandfather of Dr. Babcock, was the founder of this family in Wisconsin, having brought his wife and children to Neenah during early days. Dr. Babcock's father, who is a traveling salesman, resides in Appleton. He and his wife had three children, namely: Adelbert A., who is a civil engineer of Wausau, Wisconsin; Dr. Frank C.; and Ina L., who married William Zuehlke and resides in Appleton. Frank C. Babcock received his preliminary educational training in the public schools of Appleton, after which he went to Chicago and entered Chicago College of Dental Surgery, graduating therefrom in 1897, since which time he has been practicing in Kaukauna. He is a member of the State and county organizations of his profession, and is secretary of the Fox River Valley Dental Society. He has a large practice, and is esteemed by the members of his profession and his fellow townsmen. Dr. Babcock was married January 6, 1898, to Miss Helen L. Holbrook, of Appleton, daughter of H. S. Holbrook, a well-known business man of that city.

WILLIAM ABEL, one of Outagamie county's industrious agriculturists, who is engaged in cultivating a fine farm of 120 acres in section 14, Cicero township, was born in Pomerania, Germany, October 16, 1849, a son of Christian and Wilhelmina Abel, natives of that country. Christian Abel was born in April, 1817, and died March 6, 1904, and his wife, born in April, 1820, died June 10, 1902. They were the parents of five children, namely: Fredericka, August, William, Wilhelmina and Anstina, and of these, August was the first to come to America, the rest of the family following him here during the following year, 1873. The Abels located first at Winchester, Winnebago county, where William Abel spent a few weeks working for the farmers, and he then came to Cicero township, Outagamie county and settled on eighty acres of wild land, building a log house 20x25 feet, and a log stable 20x28 feet. Later he added forty acres more of wild land, and both this and the original purchase have been cleared and cultivated and the farm is now one of the most valuable of its size in Cicero township. In 1893 he erected a basement barn, 36x70, in 1902 he erected a handsome nine-room house, and in 1907 a wagon shed and hog barn, 20x44 feet, was built. In addition to carrying on a general line of farming, Mr. Abel raises good fat cattle, and he bears the reputation of being a good, practical agriculturist and a fine judge of livestock. In 1880, Mr. Abel was married to Anna Krueger, who was born in Dodge county, Wisconsin, daughter of Carl and Paulina (Kuanart) Krueger, and the children born to this union were as follows: Robert, Paulina, Herman, William, Emma, Anna, Louisa and Otto. Mr. and Mrs. Krueger had four children: Julius and Morich, all born in Germany; and William and Anna, born in Dodge county, Wisconsin. After the death of Carl Krueger, his widow was married a second time, to a Mr. Bladom, by whom she had two children: Paulina and Robert. William Abel has been a hard, conscientious worker all of his life, and he has been successful because of this hard work. He stands high in the esteem of his fellow townsmen and is a representative and public-spirited citizen.

EMIL MUELLER, farmer and stock raiser of section 13, Cicero township, is now managing the large property of his father, Gottlieb Mueller. Gottlieb Mueller was born March 27, 1844, in Passau, Germany, a son of Michael and Henrietta (Nicholas) Mueller, the former of whom died in 1861, aged forty-five years. He had two children by his first wife, Michael and Gottlieb, and after her death he married her cousin. Gottlieb Mueller was but two years of age when his mother died, and he worked among the farmers of his native country until he was twenty-five years old, at which time he came to the United States with his uncle, August. He remained in Milwaukee for several weeks, and then secured employment with Gottlieb Reinor, at Winchester, Winnebago county, with whom he continued four years. At this time he was married to Wilhelmina Abel, and during the next summer they came to Cicero township. Having carefully saved his earnings, Mr. Mueller was enabled to invest in forty acres of wild land in section 13, where he erected a log cabin, 18x25 feet, and a log stable 20x26 feet, and he at once started to clear his land. This being accomplished, and a good crop grown, he bought eighty acres more, across the road, and after this was cleared he purchased the eighty-acre tract on which his son now lives, which was also wild land. Although Mr. Mueller was a hard and conscientious worker, credit must also be given to his sons, who helped him to put this property under cultivation. In 1894 Mr. Mueller built a barn 36x70 feet, with basement under all, and in 1899 he erected a handsome fourteen-room house. In addition to these and other buildings there is also a wagon and tool shed, 22x50 feet. Mr. Mueller carries on general farming and also raises a fine grade of live stock, and he ranks high among the agriculturists of his township. His wife died in 1899, aged forty-six years, having been the mother of the following children: Charles B., born August 21, 1874; Lizzie, born July 31, 1876; Robert, born February 25, 1880; Emil, born November 10, 1883, the manager of the homestead farm, married in 1907, Minnie Rush, born August 28, 1886, in Osborn township, daughter of August Rush, and they have one child, George, born August 12, 1908; Emma B., born March 17, 1890; and Minnie, born March 7, 1896. Mr. Mueller has been living practically retired since January, 1909, at which time his son Emil took over the active management of the farm, which he is now operating along scientific lines and using the latest power farm machinery.

FRED BRANDENBURG, who during a period covering thirty years was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Outagamie county, was a man who took an active part in the progress and development of this section, and in his death, which occurred February 23, 1908, Cicero township lost one of its most highly esteemed citizens. Fred Brandenburg was born in Pomerania, Germany, and came to the United States in 1873, working at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, until 1878, when he located on forty acres of wild land in Cicero township, which he had purchased two years before. He was married in 1876 to Bertha Grasse, who was born in Germany, April 24, 1853, and came to the United States six months after the arrival of her husband. She was the daughter of Daniel and Engle (Brogan) Grasse, whose other children were: Mary, who is deceased; Lot and August, residing in Dakota; Mrs. Reca Deckman; and Caroline and Ferdinand, who are deceased. In 1878 Mr. and Mrs. Brandenburg settled on the Cicero township farm, where he built a log cabin 18x28 feet and two log barns, 30x16 feet and 20x22 feet. Four years later he bought eighty acres more of wild land, and still later purchased another tract of eighty acres, and he lived to see it all cleared from the wilderness and changed into a productive, well-equipped farm. He erected three upright frame buildings, two being 16x28 feet, and the other 16x16 feet, and during the same year built a basement barn 40x80 feet, and a stone hog barn, 24x50 feet. He was a great lover of horses, and always kept a number of well-bred animals on his property. Although Mr. Brandenburg was known in his neighborhood as a careful farmer, who always took the best care of his tools and equipment, he was the victim of several severe accidents. At Oshkosh, while sawing in the woods, on the present site of Antigo, a falling limb broke his left arm. Later, while working on his farm, he started to use a pry in lieu of a stump-puller, and when the team started too soon, the pry broke the same arm that had been injured before. On another occasion, Mr. Brandenburg was building his hay barn, and while loading stone his horse swerved suddenly, overturning the half-filled stone boat which crushed and broke his left leg. Mr. Brandenburg's final illness started as an attack of la grippe, which ran into erysipelas, from the effects of which he died. Mr. Brandenburg was always a hard worker, and to this must be accredited his success in his chosen occupation, as he started in life with no means and but few advantages of any kind. A good and public-spirited citizen, an excellent agriculturist and a loving husband and father, Mr. Brandenburg's death was felt by not only his immediate family, but by those in his township who had come to know and appreciate his many admirable qualities. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Brandenburg: Bernhard; Emil; Martha, who married William Burmeister; Lena, who married August Burmeister; Emma, and Ida.

Bernhard Brandenburg took up the management of the home farm after his father's death, and he also owns eighty acres on the west side of the old home place, where he has a comfortable home and a fine barn. He has an honorable discharge from Company C, of the Third United States Infantry, having served in the Spanish-American War and in the Indian uprising in Minnesota after the close of the former war.

CHARLES HAHN, farmer, merchant and cheese manufacturer at Cicero, Wisconsin, was born at Meeme, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, January 21, 1868, a son of William and Catherine (Blaber) Hahn, natives of Germany, who were married in Manitowoc, where they followed farming during the remainder of their lives. Mr. Hahn died in 1895, at the age of sixty-three years, and his widow survived until 1906, when she passed away aged seventy-three years.They had the following children: William; Fred; Charles: Herman; Valentine; Christina; Minnie, who married Herman Brass; and Bertha, who married Lewis Kuhn, and all are living. Charles Hahn learned the trade of cheese maker in Manitowoc, where he remained three years working at that occupation, and in 1891 came to Cicero, where, on the junction of sections 1, 2, 11 and 12, he built a 20x44 cheese factory on one-half acre of ground. In 1894 he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law, Otto Brass, the company taking the firm name of Hahn & Company, and in 1895 they built a store 24x30 feet, later adding thirty feet more in depth, and eventually built the 28x30 residence in the rear. The present creamery is 26x70 feet. When the firm started in business the daily output was about 3,000 pounds, and it now runs from 12,000 to 15,000 pounds, in addition to a large business done in cream. Mr. Hahn and his partner first invested in forty acres of partly improved land, where a 38x40 basement barn was erected, this having been added to until it now measures 38x90 feet, with a basement under all, and includes a wagon and tool shed 24x44 feet. Two eighty-acre tracts were later added to the original purchase, and the whole property is now in a fine state of cultivation. Mr. Hahn is a Republican in politics, but votes for the man he deems best fitted for the office in county and local matters. He served as treasurer of Cicero township from 1901 to 1906, and was the first and only postmaster of Cicero, holding that office from its organization in 1899 until its discontinuance seven years later.

In 1894 Mr. Hahn was married to Emma Brass, who was born in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin, September 13, 1871, daughter of Cornelius and Fredericka (Strassberger) Brass, natives of Germany, the former of whom came to America when twenty years of age and the latter when she was only two years old. They were married in Sheboygan county, where they spent the remainder of their lives in agricultural pursuits, Mr. Brass dying in 1876. They had nine children: Bertha; Herman; Julius; Otto, Mr. Hahn's partner; Lena; Emma; Gustave; Ida, who is deceased and Cornelius. To Mr. and Mrs. Hahn there are three children: Fred, January 8, 1901; John, September 26, 1903; and Raymond, March 14, 1905.

HENRY SCHULTZ, who owns and operates a well cultivated farm of eighty acres situated in section 15, Cicero township, was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, September 13, 1849, and is a son of Henry and Dora (Koehler) Schultz, who spent their lives in that country. Henry Schultz was the eldest child of his parents, the others being Mary, Reca, Joseph and two who died in infancy, and he received his education in the schools of his native country, coming to the United States at the age of twenty years. He first located in New York, from whence he removed to the city of Philadelphia, and after working there for five years came to Wisconsin, finding employment in the first pulp and paper mill in Appleton. In 1879, having accumulated some money, he came to Cicero township, locating on eighty acres of wild land in section 15, to which there had been no road built, and he packed his provisions on his back in lieu of a better means of transporting them. There were several lumber shacks on the place when he arrived there, and in these he lived until he could find time to erect better buildings, and his first barn was a small log shanty. He later built two log barns, one 28x56 and the other 28x28 feet, but these have been replaced with a modern basement barn 40x70, well ventilated by King's system, and with a cement floor. He makes a specialty of Guernsey high grade cattle, having a thoroughbred sire, and also raises Poland-China and Duroc hogs, which are kept in a fine hog barn, 18x42 feet, in addition to which he had a silo with a capacity of 100 tons. Mr. Schultz resides in a modern, eight-room house with all modern conveniences, and all of the equipments on his property are up-to-date in every respect. Mr. Schultz was married in Philadelphia, to Augusta Kleinshmidt, who was born in Pomerania, Germany, and who came to this country alone. She was born September 14, 1850, and still survives. Mr. and Mrs. Schultz have had six children: Henry; Ida, who married George Peters, a banker of Black Creek, Wisconsin; Bertha, who is a traveling nurse of Milwaukee; Dora, who married Edward Tesch, of Chicago; and Mary and Robert, residing at home.

AUGUST MARCKS, a prominent farmer of Cicero township, where he has held the office of assessor for the past fifteen years, is a native of Pomerania, Germany, where he was born October 24, 1845, a son of Gotthilf and Marie Doretta (Eske) Marcks. There were fourteen children in his parents' family, but of these only five grew to maturity, namely, William, Ferdinand, August, Minnie and Anistina, and the parents, with Minnie and Anistina, came to the United States in 1868. After spending five years at the town of Lebanon they came to Seymour township, securing forty acres of wild land, but after living here some time Gotthilf Marcks went to South Dakota, where he lived for sixteen years, eventually returning to Wisconsin to spend his last years with his son, August, and died aged eighty-nine years, his wife having passed away when eighty-five years old. August Marcks received his education in his native country, and as is the custom in Germany, when he had reached his twenty-first year he entered the army to serve his three years. On receiving his honorable discharge from the Emperor's service, he came to the United States, in 1869, securing employment in the brick yard at Watertown, Wisconsin, where he remained one year. He then worked for the farmers of that section for a year, when he went to Seymour township, being engaged in working in a sawmill for five years, when he engaged in farming on a tract of wild land, on which he built a log cabin and worked on for five years. At this time, deciding that there were better opportunities offered him in Cicero township, he moved to section 13, where he purchased eighty acres of land, on which there had been a small clearing made, and a log house, 18x24 feet, had been built. Mr. Marcks has been engaged in farming and stock raising here to the present time, and that he has been successful in his operations may be seen by a glance at his well-ordered fields, neatly fenced, his sleek, fat cattle, his modern, powerful machinery and his large residence and substantial barns and outbuildings. He has found time to engage in public matters, and his popularity in Cicero township is shown in the fact that in addition to serving as a member of the town board for one year and as constable for five years, he is now acting in the capacity of assessor for his fifteenth consecutive year. Mr. Marcks was married in 1872, to Augusta Fuhrman, born in Pomerania, Germany, July 14, 1852, who came to the United States with her parents in 1868, settling in Dodge county. She is the only representative of the family surviving. Mr. and Mrs. Marcks have had fifteen children: William, residing in Shawano county; August, who resides in Outagamie county; Anna, who married Frank Cloos, of South Dakota; Fred, residing in Shawano county; Herman and John, living in this county; Minna, who married John Reinke, of Outagamie county; Lizzie, who nmarried Edward Fresher in Appleton, Wisconsin; George, who lives in South Dakota; Henry, living at home; and five children who are deceased.

HERMAN MIELKE, who owns one of Cicero township's best equipped farming properties, situated on section 9, has been extensively engaged in farming and stock raising for a number of years. He was born September 27, 1868, in Washington county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Adam and Wilhelmina (Hubner) Mielke, and a grandson of Martin and Louisa (Yokabitz) Mielke. Adam Mielke, who was born in Germany, came to the United States in 1856, on a sailing vessel which took six weeks to cross the ocean, and settled in Washington county, Wisconsin, where he resided until 1879, and in that year located in Cicero township, Outagamie county. Herman Mielke grew up in Washington county, and after his father had left for Cicero township, he remained for three years at Fond du Lac, then coming on to join the family. There were eighty acres of wild land in the home tract, on which were a little log house and barn, and this land the young man eventually purchased from his father, later adding forty acres more, of which fifteen had been cleared. Mr. Mielke now has all of his property in a high state of cultivation, and his buildings include a basement barn, 40x80x18 feet; a hog house, 16x36 feet; a wagon shed and addition to barn, 22x56 feet; a double corn crib, 12x24 feet, and a large, modern eleven-room house. The nucleus for this magnificent farm, with its great fields of grain, and its pasture lands filled with sleek herds of cattle, was one cow and a yoke of oxen, the family's sole possessions on coming to this land. Thrift and enterprise, with years of hard labor, however, soon transformed the wilderness into a fertile farm, and made the poor travelers into prosperous and prominent agriculturists. In 1883, Herman Mielke was married to Rosa Kuhn, daughter of Christ and Catherine (Anderes) Kuhn, the latter of whom died in 1902, aged fifty-two years. Christ Kuhn was born in March, 1839, in Germany, son of Mathias and Catherine Kuhn, and was but four years of age when he was brought to this country. In 1879 he secured a tract of eighty acres of wild land in Cicero township, and there he has been engaged in tilling the soil to the present time. He and his wife had these children: Kate, Henry, Rosa, John, Martha, Anna, William, George, Theodore and Lottie, all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Mielke have had seven children, as follows: Herbert, Martha, Gertrude, Lawrence, Ada, Edna and Earl.

FRANK SCHNABL, who is operating the old Schnabl homestead in Cicero township, has resided on this property all of his life. He was born August 22, 1872, and is a son of Franz and Fannie (Gotzl) Schnabl, and a grandson of Peter and Marie (Dinger) Schnabl. Peter Schnabl, who died in 1854, at the age of fifty-four years, had six children: Mandalin, Marmield, Catherine, Franz, Elizabeth and Anna. Franz Schnabl was born in Austria, August 24, 1842, and in 1869 came to America and located at Hortonville, Wisconsin, where he worked two years. In 1871 he came to Cicero township, locating on forty acres of wild land in section 32, following the trail to find his property, there being no roads cut through at that time. He had one cow and one ox, as had also his brother-in-law, Frank Klarner, who lived on the adjoining property, and in order to do their farming they exchanged oxen, thus making a yoke. After clearing up his original purchase, Mr. Schnabl purchased forty acres more in section 30, and later bought forty acres of swamp land in Bovina township. The first log cabin, that had been built to accommodate the two families, 12x24 feet, was replaced soon after Mr. Schnabl got started by another log cabin of his own, and other log buildings, barn and stable, and in 1892 he built a ten-room house. The barns and other buildings on the property have been built by his son who took over the place at Mr. Schnabl's retirement, and he is now living a quiet life, enjoying the fruits of his early years of toil. His wife, who was born March 7, 1845, in Germany, is a daughter of Charles and Frances (Fischer) Gotzl, whose other children were: Wensel, Crescent, Theresa and Louisa. Mr. Gotzl died in 1868, aged sixty-two years, and his wife passed away in 1870, when fifty-four years of age. The children of Franz and Fannie Schnabl were as follows: Emma, who married Anton Meinlschmidt; Frank; Emil, who married Annie Fischer; Mary, who married Andrew Berner, of Cicero township; Louise, who married William Sorenson, of Appleton; Walter, and Josie. Of the foregoing named children Walter is deceased. Frank Schnabl attended the district schools of Cicero township, and has always remained on the home farm, of which he took charge in February, 1899. In addition to securing eighty acres more in the town of Maine, section 25, for the home farm, he has made numerous improvements, among which may be mentioned the boring of a well on the place, he having done a great deal of this kind of work in the township. He has built a basement barn, 40x70 feet, with cement flooring; a hog barn, 16x60 feet, with chicken coop connected; a building 16x70 feet used for cream separator room, butcher shop and work shop; and a wagon shed 28x30 feet, and in addition he erected the first stone silo in Cicero township. He carries on general farming and raises good stock, and is one of the representative agriculturists of his section. He was married November 23, 1897, to Miss Anna Barth, daughter of Franz and Maggie Barth, early settlers of Cicero township and natives of Germany, and to this union there have been born five children: Maggie, Frank, Catherine, Laura and Charles, of whom Laura is deceased. In 1897 Mr. Schnabl also bought a threshing outfit and a pony sawmill and feedmill, which was built on the forty acres in section 30, in Cicero township. He operated the threshing outfit for six falls and the mills for nine winters in addition to his regular farming duties.

FRED MERBACH, president of the Merbach Hardware and Furniture Company, at Kaukauna, Wisconsin, is one of the representative business men of this city and has had years of practical experience along this line. He was born in Calumet county, Wisconsin, October 21, 1867, a, son of John and Sophia (Brockmann) Merbach. The parents of Mr. Merbach celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their wedding, on March 1, 1911, at which time they enjoyed the presence of their kindred from distant and nearby points, including the following of their children: Fred, Louis and Mrs. George Buerth, of South Kaukauna; Charles, of Neenah; Henry, of Eau Claire; John, Jr., of Harrison; Peter and William, of Drake, South Dakota; Albert, of Great Falls, Montana and Mrs. Anna Miller, of Appleton, together with the grandchildren, twenty-two in number. Mr. Merbach is the oldest member of Paul H. Beaulieu Post, G. A. R., having served in the great Civil War as a member of Company E, Sixth Wisconsin Infantry. In 1897 Mr. and Mrs. Merbach came to Kaukauna but he still retains his old homestead farm of 145 acres in Harrison township. During many years of his active life, Mr. Merbach officiated in public office and after retiring from farming was in the insurance business from 1895 until 1910, when he resigned and since then has been taking the ease to which his age and former activities entitle him. Both Mr. and Mrs. Merbach were born in Germany and came to the United States when young, the families being pioneers in Wisconsin.

Fred Merbach attended the country schools and afterward was a clerk in a hardware store at Appleton, from 1884 until 1894, when he came to Kaukauna where he operated a store for one year, for Haas & Brier, and afterward went into business for himself, which he continued until he went to Ripon, where he bought a hardware store and conducted it for six years. He then disposed of his Ripon interests and for two years traveled for a purpose of recreation, visiting different points in the South, after which he was a representative of a hardware firm for some nine months and then became interested in his present business. On May 6, 1911, he went into business under the firm name of the Merbach Hardware and Furniture Company. He deals in general hardware, stoves, paints, oils, etc., also carries a general line of furniture and does undertaking, giving employment to eight people and doing his own management. He occupies one entire floor and the basement of a building that has a 50-foot front and is 100 feet in depth, an excellent location for business purposes. Mr. Merbach was married in 1884, to Miss Minnie Neumann, of Calumet county, Wisconsin, and they have two children: Edward and Elphie. Mr. and Mrs. Merbach are members of the Congregational Church. He is identified with the Modern Woodmen. Edward Merbach, his son, was born January 12, 1889. He attended the grade schools at Kaukauna and finished his high school course in Ripon. In 1910 he received the degree of Bachelor of Arts from Ripon College. While in college he participated in athletics, winning his letter in several branches, among these basketball, baseball and football. He graduated in chemistry and physics. In 1910 he was elected principal of the High School at Stanley, Wisconsin, and was reelected the following year. This position he still holds.

E. W. TAMM, one of the younger generation of business men of Kaukauna, Wisconsin, who is the proprietor of a dry goods and grocery establishment in this city, was born in Calumet county, Wisconsin, March 2, 1884, and is a son of August and Minnie (Westfall) Tamm, natives of Germany. Charles Tamm, the grandfather of E. W. Tamm, was born in Germany, and in 1863 brought his family to the United States, settling in Calumet county. Here August Tamm bought wild land, there being but three white families in the county, and there he has engaged in agricultural pursuits up to the present time. His wife, who is also living there, came to this country alone in 1873. They had a family of five sons, of whom all are living but one. E. W. Tamm received his early education in the schools of the vicinity of his father's farm, on which he worked while not engrossed with his studies, and later he attended Boyle's Business College at Omaha, Nebraska, from which he was graduated in 1908. He secured a bookkeeper position in an Omaha mercantile establishment, where he remained one year, then going to Appleton, where he was employed as bookkeeper for the St. Paul Railroad until 1908. In that year he purchased the store of William Conrad, at Kaukauna, which he has since conducted with much success. He carries a full and up-to-date line of dry aroods and groceries, and has built up a large and lucrative trade. His building has a floor space 26x84 feet, consists of two stories and a basement, and is equipped with all modern appliances and conveniences. In 1908, Mr. Tamm was married to Bertha Wieting, of Kiel, Wisconsin, daughter of Fred and May Wieting. Mr. and Mrs. Tamm are consistent members of the Methodist Church. He is connected fraternally with the Masonic order, and is very popular among the members of his lodge.

HARRY E. THOMPSON, a well-known and successful shoe merchant of Kaukauna, Wisconsin, who is the proprietor of the oldest establishment in this line on the south side, has been intimately connected with civic affairs in Kaukauna during the past few years. Mr. Thompson was born in Norway, February 1, 1856, and came to the United States in 1871 with an uncle, on whose farm in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, he worked during the summer months, while attending school during the winter time. In 1873 he went to Cato, Wisconsin, to learn the trade of shoemaker, and later was located at Alexandria, Minnesota, and Bismarck, North Dakota. After one year at the latter place he returned to Cato, from whence after a short period he came to Kaukauna and opened a shoe store, in 1884, in the Mills Block. In 1897, his increased trade demanding more space, he came to his present location, where he has a modern establishment, equipped with every convenience and facility known to the shoe trade. Mr. Thompson is possessed of much business ability, and his business has demanded much of his attention, but he has still found time to devote to public matters, and has served very acceptably as alderman and poor commissioner, and is now acting in the capacities of water commissioner and school treasurer. His fraternal connections are with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Masons. Mr. Thompson was married June 27, 1888, to Marion Haugen, of Valders, Wisconsin, and two children have been born to this union: Oscar T., who is a student at the University of Wisconsin, at Madison; and Marcella, aged fourteen, attending the public schools. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson are members of the Lutheran faith, but are attending the Congregational Church at Kaukauna.

E. CLARENCE GRISWOLD, one of the prosperous business men of Kaukauna, who was the first jeweler to settle permanently in this city, is the proprietor of a large furniture and jewelry establishment on the south side. He is a native of Vermont, born on August 21, 1848, a son of Merrill and Sarah (Parks) Griswold, natives of the Green Mountain State who came to Wisconsin in 1866. Merrill Griswold was a watchmaker by trade, and as a boy E. Clarence Griswold went to New York to learn the trade of jeweler. In 1861 he went to Horicon, Wisconsin, but during the following year returned to the East, and in 1868 again came to Wisconsin, this time locating at Fox Lake. After a few years he removed to Cambria, Wisconsin, and in 1881 he came to Kaukauna, where he opened a jewelry and furniture store on the north side. On July 18, 1891, he established himself in his present business on the south side, and here he has since carried on business, dealing in a first-class line of furniture and jewelry. Mr. Griswold is an expert jeweler, and his goods can absolutely be relied upon to be of standard make, an appreciation of which fact may be found in the large patronage which his establishment enjoys. On May 14, 1880, Mr. Griswold was married at Cambria, Wisconsin, to Ruth Richards. They are members of the Congregational Church, and in political matters he votes the Republican ticket.

JOSEPH LEHRER, alderman of the Fourth Ward, Kaukauna, and one of the successful self-made business men of that city, owning the oldest butcher shop in this vicinity and one of the finest in the State, was born June 3, 1864, in Bohemia. He received his educational training in the schools of his native country, and after coming to Appleton, in 1882, he learned the butcher trade, which he followed at various places, eventually locating in Kaukauna in 1884. Mr. Lehrer was very favorably impressed with this city, and after a trip to Idaho, in 1886 and 1887, he returned to Kaukauna, where in April 6, 1895, he opened an establishment of his own, and this is now the oldest in the city. It is fitted with all modern appliances and appurtenances, being one of the finest appointed shops of its kind in Wisconsin, and he caters to the most exclusive trade in Kaukauna, handling only the finest grades of meats, poultry and fish. On August 16, 1894, Mr. Lehrer was united in marriage with Margaret Zink, at Kaukauna, and they have had five children -- one daughter and four sons, namely: Regina, Morris, Joseph, Richard and Sylvester, Miss Regina being a pupil in the Kaukauna schools. Mr. Lehrer and his family are members of St. Mary's congregation of the Roman Catholic Church. He is a, member of the Modern Woodmen of America and the Equitable Fraternal Union, and he has also been prominent in civic affairs, serving his city as alderman of the Fourth Ward at the present time. In addition to building up a large and successful business, Mr. Lehrer has erected a comfortable home in Kaukauna, and he is regarded as one of the city's substantial business men and public-spirited citizens. In the spring of 1908 Mr. Lehrer made a trip to his native land.

FRED HOEHNE, alderman of the First Ward of Kaukauna during the past eight years, and proprietor of Hoehne's Machine Works and Foundry and Garage, is a native of Germany and came to the United States in 1882, when he was twenty-eight years of age. He had learned the machine trade in his native country, and on first coming to this country found work in a machine shop in Milwaukee, but after a few months removed to Kaukauna and commenced working at his trade. On October 12, 1892, having decided to enter the business field on his own account, he opened a machine shop in this city, and he has been engaged in business here ever since. The principal output of Mr. Hoehne's shop is an invention of his own, known as Hoehne's Friction Clutch, supposed to be the simplest clutch on the market, which is used in power transmission equipments. Friction pulleys and couplings are also manufactured, and general job and contract machine work of all kinds done, and from four to eight skilled mechanics employed. Electric power is used throughout the works. Mr. Hoehne also operates an automobile garage, and he is the local dealer for the Ford and Buick machines. In 1882, Fred Hoehne was married to Attilla Knitter, who was born in Germany and came to the United States in 1882, at the same time as Mr. Hoehne, whom she had known in the Fatherland. They have had seven children, namely: Carl, a machinist by trade, working in Milwaukee; Agnes, who married John Schue, a resident of Kaukauna; William, residing at home, a machinist; Otto, a machinist and automobile builder; Herman, employed in his father's garage; and Alma and Elsie, living at home. The family is connected with St. John's Evangelical Church. Mr. Hoehne is public-spirited to a, large degree, and has served his city as alderman of the First Ward for a period covering the last eight years.

WILLIAM J. TESCH, cashier of the First National Bank of Kaukauna, Wisconsin, has been engaged in financial institutions all of his business career, starting as a messenger boy, and working his way up through the various positions to his present office through the force of his own ability and faithful service. Mr. Tesch was born at Appleton, Wisconsin, April 18, 1876, and received his education in the graded schools and the Ryan High school in that city. When still a youth, he entered the First National. Bank of Appleton, after spending one year in Lawrence College, and continued to remain in the employ of that institution for thirteen years, being finally made assistant cashier. He became connected with the First National Bank of Kaukauna in 1906, and has held his present position ever since. In October, 1907, Mr. Tesch was married at Milwaukee to Miss Ethel Cameron, of that city. He is connected fraternally with the Masons and Knights of Pythias, and also holds membership in the Appleton Country Club.

JOHN A. STEWART, justice of the peace of the First Ward, Seymour, Wisconsin, has been identified with the public interests of this section for more than thirty-five years, and until his retirement was prominently connected with large milling and mercantile industries. He was born April 29, 1850, in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, and is of Scotch-Irish extraction, his father having come to New York when sixteen years old where he entered the commercial field. He was there married to Eliza Jane Gamble, who had come from Ireland, and was of Scotch-Irish parentage, and while living in New York they had three children: James A., William G. and Esther A. In 1844 the family came West by way of the Canal and Great Lakes to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and there the father, Nathaniel Stewart, purchased 160 acres of wild land in Meeme township. Here he built a log cabin, 16x24 feet, the logs being carried by hand, as there were no teams to do the work, and the roof was made of hollow basswood logs, split. In this little log cabin John A. Stewart was born. After he had cleared about forty acres and had gotten together some stock and an ox team, the father sold this property and moved to Liberty township, where a new start was made on eighty acres of wild timber land, a little better log cabin and log barn were built, and here he cleared up the eighty acres and added to it another tract of like acreage, part of which had been cleared. Here the youngest son, David H., was born. Mr. Stewart, the father, was originally an Andrew Jackson Democrat, but later became connected with the Republican party, and held various township offices in the gift of the people, especially those positions which had to do with educational matters. His death occurred in Liberty township, where his noble, Christian wife also passed away, and are buried in Riverside Cemetery in the city of Manitowoc. They were members of the Presbyterian Church. James A. Stewart, the oldest child of these estimable people, is still operating the old homestead in Liberty township. William G., who died at Seymour, January 3, 1908, was for thirty years a partner of his brother John A. in the milling business, was a prominent Republican, holding the office of school clerk for ten or twelve years, and was a member of the Odd Fellows fraternity. The third child, Esther, died at the age of twenty years, after having taught school for about four years. David H. Stewart, the youngest child, is a farmer in Seymour township.

John A. Stewart was the fourth child in order of birth, and his education was secured in the district schools of Liberty township and the high school of Manitowoc, which he attended for one year, and that at Sheboygan, where he was a student two years. He then engaged in school teaching in Manitowoc county for eight years, and in 1874 came to Seymour and entered the grocery and general mercantile business with Thomas H. Mitchell, a cousin on his mother's side. In 1876 he bought a one-half interest in the flour mills owned by S. G. Shirland, the only mill in Seymour at that time, which had a capacity of twenty-four barrels, the brand of flour being known as "Fountain Mills." Two years later Mr. Stewart and his brother bought Mr. Shirland's interest, the business becoming known as Stewart Brothers, and they operated this mill until 1884, then another story was added and modern machinery installed, increasing the capacity to 124 barrels per day. After this decided increase they discarded the old name and the business became known as the Seymour Roller Mills, manufacturing "Standard" and "Superlative" brands, and maintaining a wholesale and retail flour establishment, catering to a trade that extended throughout Wisconsin and Michigan. The mill burned to the ground in September, 1901, and was never rebuilt. The Stewart brothers also conducted farms in Seymour township.

Mr. Stewart's political views have been patterned after those held by his father, an Abraham Lincoln Republican, a Grover Cleveland Democrat and a "Bob" LaFollette Progressive. In 1875 he was elected clerk of the town of Seymour, this being before the city was incorporated, and later served as alderman for a number of years, until the stress of business compelled him to forego political activities. He was instrumental in organizing Odd Fellows Lodge No. 273, of Seymour, and to-day he is the only charter member in good standing. He served this lodge several times as delegate to the Grand Lodge, and filled all the chairs in the order.

On November 7, 1877, Mr. Stewart was married at Appleton, Wisconsin, by the Rev. George Wernor, of all Saints Episcopal Church, to Lillian C. Dopkins, who was born June 2, 1858, at Delafield, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, daughter of William and Cynthia (Clark) Dopkins. William H. Dopkins was born at Amherst, New York, September 7, 1833, a son of Frederick Dopkins, who came to Waukesha county, Wisconsin, in 1844 and settled on a tract of timberland in Delafield township, where he cleared a home and resided the remainder of his life, dying in 1901, when eighty-odd years of age. His wife, Lucy Dopkins, died at the age of sixty years, some thirty-five years ago, and both are buried in Delafield Cemetery. Their children were: Edward, Kate, William H., Mary and Frank, of whom William H., Mary and Frank are living. William H. Dopkins enlisted in Company G, Twenty-eighth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, October 13, 1862, and served for four years and three months. He had married July 4, 1854, the services being performed by the Rev. Montague, Cynthia Clark, who was born at Riga, New York, January 28, 1836, and came West in 1852, living with a married sister until her own marriage. Two children: Lillian, born June 2, 1858, and Edna, born in the town of Angel, July 27, 1860, had been born before Mr. Dopkins went to the war, and after his services to his country were completed, he returned to his home, and in 1866 removed his residence to Appleton, where four sons were born: William J., born January 21, 1868, who died in infancy; William Earl, born September 4, 1869; Lucius Lloyd, born August 23, 1872, and Fred Ellis, born October 24. 1879. In 1886 the family came to Seymour, where they have made their residence to the present time, and where Mrs. Stewart was for some time engaged in teaching school.

Cynthia Clark Dopkins was a daughter of L. B. and Salinda Sarah (Smith) Clark, and a granddaughter of Eliphat and Hepzibah (Fay) Clark and Captain J. Smith. Eliphat Clark was a son of Capt. Lemuel Clark, an officer in the Revolutionary army, who died January 23, 1801, aged seventy years, the Clark family having come to the American Colonies in the Mayflower. Hepsibah Fay was a daughter of Captain Jebediah Fay, also a Revolutionary officer, who died in 1799, aged seventy-three years. The brothers and sisters of Salinda Sarah (Smith) Clark were: Roswell, Clarissa, Hart and Harney, twins; James, Charles H., Cynthia and Mary and an infant brother and sister. Of this family Clarissa and Cynthia are surviving.

Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have had four children: Esther Pearl, Mabel Elizabeth, an infant son born May 18, 1883, who died September 15th of that year, and Cynthia Maud. Esther Pearl was born February 4, 1879, and after her graduation from the Seymour high school was engaged in school teaching for six years. She was married June 16, 1903, by Rev. John Manning of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Seymour, to Prof. Charles Dean, son of James Dean, and they reside at Lincoln, Nebraska, where Prof. Dean is instructor of mechanical engineering in the University, and they have one child, Olive Lillian, born June 23, 1904. Mabel Elizabeth was born August 22, 1881, at Appleton, and after graduating from high school taught school for four years. She was married June 16, 1903, by the Rev. John Manning, to George E. Dawson, of Kaukauna, Wisconsin, a son of attorney Henry Dawson of that place, and they reside at Brillion, Calumet county, Wisconsin, where Mr. Dawson is cashier of the First National Bank. They have had two children: Stewart Edward, born July 1, 1904, and Ivan Richard, born March 21, 1908. Cynthia Maud was born May 28, 1884, graduated from the Seymour high school and the Oshkosh Normal, and after teaching school for three years was married July 17, 1907, by the Rev. Hicks of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to Hiram J. Eubank, a well-known merchant of Westfield, Wisconsin. They have two children: Mary Lillian, born in March, 1909; and Cynthia Ruth, born in September, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart still live in their comfortable home in the city of Seymour where the latch is out for their friends.

ALBERT E. ARMITAGE, who is engaged in farming in Seymour township, where he owns valuable property on section 17, is also extensively interested in stock buying and shipping, and has been identified with the growth and development of this section of Outagamie county for a number of years. He was born July 13, 1859, at Rubicon, Wisconsin, a son of Thomas and Mary Jane (Strait) Armitage, the former a native of England and the latter of New York. They were married in Dodge county, Wisconsin, Mr. Armitage having come to this section at the age of eight years with his parents, Joseph and Mary (Sykes) Armitage, whose other children were: William, Sykes, Ambrose, Phoebe, Albert, Thomas, Joseph, Robert, Fannie and Willis. Joseph Armitage was a weaver by trade and came to Dodge county, Wisconsin, in 1836, the last four years of his life being spent in Oconomowoc, Waukesha county, where he died at the age of seventy-six years. During his residence in Dodge county he served as justice of the peace. His father, Thomas Armlitage, was a head mechanic and foreman in the weaving mills near Manchester, England. Thomas Armitage, the father of Albert E., came to Seymour, Wisconsin, in 1870, but after six years went to Monterey, Michigan, where his death occurred in 1811, when he had reached the age of seventy-six years. He was a veteran of the Civil War, having served as a member of the Eighth Wisconsin Volunteers for three years. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Mary Jane Strait, was born in New York, daughter of Jesse B. and Sarah J. (Allwood) Strait. Jesse B. Strait was found in the Strait of Belisle, tied with a shawl to a plank, having possibly been cast from some sinking vessel, and he was given the name of Strait by those who rescued him. He had four children: Nemiah, Mary Jane, Hoza and Sarah.

Albert E. Armitage received his education in the log schoolhouse of school district No. 1, which is now one of the handsomest country schools in the State, and at the age of seventeen years started to make his own ,way in the world. He engaged in farming in Dodge county, and came to Seymour township with his family when he had scarcely a dollar in his pockets, his sole possessions being one horse and two four-year old cows. Locating on the old Hathaway place on section 17, on which there were two log cabins, he began to cultivate the land, and he has been so successful that he now has a fourteen-room house, a barn 40x100 feet, and a fine silo. His buildings are fitted with cement floors and patent stanchions, and his barn has a basement under all. In addition to clearing up three forty-acre tracts in Cicero township, he owns eighty acres of land in Colby, and all are well stocked and in a fine state of cultivation. He is in partnership with Robert Kuhn, of Seymour, in the stock buying business.

On August 29, 1880, Mr. Armitage was married to Mary A. Heintz, who was born April 16, 1862, daughter of Jacob Heintz, and to this union there have been born twelve children: Amy, William, Mina, Harry, Phoebe, Alvah, Claude, Fannie, Nora, Laura, Irwin and Melvin.

FRED W. STELLMACHER, one of the substantial agriculturists of Seymour township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who is carrying on extensive operations on his fine farm on section 8, has been a resident of this section since early times and has had the opportunity to watch and to participate in the wonderful development of this part of the country. Mr. Stellmacher was born March 15, 1849, in Brandenburg, Germany, a son of Ludwig and Dorothea (Gorgin) Stellmacher, who were married in Germany and came to the United States in 1870, with the following children: Louisa, Ludwig, Fred W., Gusta, Mary and Julius, while another daughter, Wilhelmina, remained in Germany. The family located at Horicon, Dodge county, Wisconsin, on their uncle Agidius' farm, but two years later purchased ten acres of land near Horicon, and here Mr. Stellmacher lived until his removal, March 15, 1877, to Seymour township, Outagamie county.

Fred W. Stellmacher was married in 1876 to Caroline Alberts, and during the next year they moved to Seymour township and located on forty acres of wild land on section 8, putting up a log stable and a frame house 14x20 feet, a part of the latter being their present home. Mr. Stellmacher worked hard in clearing the land from the brush and timber, and soon set out apple trees, which he carried in from a distant town, and which are now fine old apple trees, bearing great loads of fruit every year. He added thirty acres to his original purchase and built one of the finest barns in the county, with a large roomy basement, 40x80 feet, and the house has been added to and remodeled until it has become a splendid, comfortable dwelling. Later Mr. Stellmacher added another eighty acres to his farm, this being located on section 9, cleared the land and erected a large house and barn, and here his son Fred now resides. Mr. Stellmacher carries on general farming, and raises a fine grade of livestock. In his political views he is a Republican, and he has served very acceptably as township treasurer and assessor, as a member of the school board, and as road inspector for fifteen years.

Mrs. Stellmacher was born in Horicon, Dodge county, Wisconsin, February 28, 1858, daughter of August and Louisa (Baker) Alberts, the former a native of Saxony and the latter of Brunswick, Germany. Mr. Alberts came to the United States at the age of eighteen years, his wife having come here with her parents when ten years old, and they were married in Washington county, Wisconsin, and had the following children: Caroline, Henry, Louis, William, Minnie, Mary and Emma. To Mr. and Mrs. Stellmacher there have been born the following children: Emma, born December 13, 1875; Mary Wilhelmina, August 1, 1877; Elsie Augusta, March 6, 1879; Caroline Dorothea, July 14, 1880; Fred Carl, October 21, 1882; Louisa Minnie, August 2, 1884; Almy Dora, November 21, 1892; Gracie Gertrude, October 19, 1894; Stella Fedora, March 2, 1897; Freda Victoria, May 31, 1899; Carl Ludwig, June 9, 1886; and Margaret Victoria, who died aged seven years.

NICK TRAUFLER, one of the substantial citizens and progressive agriculturists of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, whose excellent farm is located on section 22, in Seymour township, was born May 26, 1854, in Luxemburg, Germany, a son of Martin and Mary Traufler. Mrs. Traufler died in Germany in 1864, aged fifty years, and in 1873 the father came to the United States with his three children: Nick, Michael and Maggie, and settled on section 21, Seymour township, on forty acres of wild land, where Mr. Traufler resided until his death in 1885, at the age of sixty-six years. Nick Traufier remained in Appleton, Wisconsin, and worked for E. C. Goff for seven or eight years, at the end of which time he located in Seymour township, on wild land in section 21, he and his wife starting their lives in this section in a little log cabin. Mr. Traufler experienced all of the hardships and privations of the pioneer, but little by little claimed his land from the wilderness, and soon had a comfortable home erected. He added forty acres to his original purchase, and here he resided until 1900, when he moved across the road to section 22, and here he has since made his home. He has a fertile, well-watered property, nicely fenced and well graded, with abundant pasture land for his cattle, and his buildings are modern, substantial and in the best of repair. He raises large crops, and his graded stock is as good as any to be found in the township.

In 1881, Mr. Traufler was united in marriage with Mary Groth, who was born July 29, 1861, in Mecklenburg, Germany, daughter of Fred and Anna (Weeman) Groth, who came to the United States in 1869. Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Groth, Mary, Christ and Fred were born in Germany, and Leonard and Henrietta in the United States. Mr. Groth located in the town of Center, Rock county, Wisconsin, where Mr. Groth died in 1895, aged sixty-five years, while his widow still survives, having reached the age of seventy- seven. Mr. and Mrs. Traufler have had the following children: Maggie, born December 15, 1882; John, born April 17, 1884; Michael, born January 18, 1886; Anna, born September 20, 1887; Mayme, born September 1, 1889; William, born September 28, 1891; Louise, born March 2, 1894; Minnie, born May 10, 1896; and Henry, born February 21, 1900.

FRANK LEISGANG, who is now carrying on agricultural operations on his sixty-acre farm in Seymour township, Outagamie county, was born near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, October 21, 1867, a son of George and Sophia (Krause) Leisgang, residents of Black Creek township, where they were early settlers. Frank Leisgang attended the parochial schools of St. Anna, Calumet county, and was but thirteen years of age when he began to support himself. He learned the butchering business, which he followed for four or five years in West Bend, Washington county, and then went to Black Creek township, where he spent one summer, the following nine winters being spent as a cook in the Wisconsin lumber camps. He then started a butcher shop in Black Creek, which he conducted for about one year, and then sold out and for a few months resided in Appleton. Returning to Milwaukee, Mr. Leisgang was for two years engaged as fireman in a distillery and was for another year employed by a stove concern in the manufacture of gasoline lamps, and in December, 1900, he located on his present sixty-acre tract, located on section 22, Seymour township. This property had been allowed to deteriorate to some extent, and the buildings were old and dilapidated, but in a few months Mr. Leisgang had replaced these with new, modern, substantial structures, including a handsome residence. He took the property well in hand and by scientific methods soon transformed it into a fertile and productive farm, on which he raises large crops and breeds valuable livestock.

In 1897, Mr. Leisgang was married to Mary Becker, who was, born in Center, Wisconsin, February 12, 1877, a daughter of Charles and Julia (Kern) Becker, farming people of Black Creek township. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Leisgang, as follows: Theodore, Catherine, Aloysius, Leonard, Carl and Norbert. Mr. Leisgang has acted in the capacity of clerk of school district No. 7, of Seymour township.

LLOYD TUBBS, who is engaged in agricultural operations on section 22, Seymour township, is a native of Lebanon, Dodge county, Wisconsin, having been born here November 26, 1866, and is a son of Peter and Phoebe (Armitage) Tubbs and a grandson of Jacob and Clymenia (Cottrell) Tubbs.

Jacob Tubbs was born in New York and his wife in Massachusetts, and they were married in the former State, from whence they came to Wisconsin in 1848, the family locating on property in Dodge county. Here Peter Tubbs was reared and from this farm he went to enlist in the Civil War, through which he served with faithfulness and bravery. On his return he worked for a time on his father's farm, and he then struck out for himself, settling on wild land in Outagamie county, which he soon brought to a cultivated state, and became one of the large land owners of this section. He rose to a place of prominence in the township and held various offices of trust and honor, and he is now a member of the advisory board and vice-president of the First National Bank of Seymour. He married Phoebe Armitage, a native of Dodge county and a daughter of Joseph and Mary Armitage, and their union was blessed by the birth of ten children, of whom Lloyd is the eldest.

Lloyd Tubbs was educated in the district school and remained on his father's farm as foreman until he reached the age of thirty-three years, at which time he purchased eighty acres of land on section 28, Seymour township. He farmed this property for nine years, and at the end of this period bought his present finely improved tract of sixty acres, on which are located substantial, modern buildings. Mr. Tubbs raises thoroughbred Holstein cattle, Berkshire swine, Leghorn chickens and thoroughbred Scotch Collie dogs. He is a Republican in politics and a strong temperance man. He was town assessor for one year and for two or three years held the secretaryship of the Seymour Fair and Driving Park.

In 1888 Mr. Tubbs was married to Miss Effie Shepherd, who was born February 8, 1871, the daughter of Frederick Forest and Susan (Steward) Shepherd. Mr. Shepherd was born March 6, 1848, married July 4, 1873, and was a son of Thomas Shepherd. He and his wife had two daughters, Mrs. Tubbs' sister, Cora, being now deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd H. Tubbs have been born seven children: Harry L., born November 12, 1889; Cora M., born July 4, 1891; Ralph E., born August 25, 1893; Etta L., born July 15, 1896; Iva V., born March 19, 1899; Gertrude E., born May 1, 1902; and Bernice L., born July 24, 1904. All the foregoing named children were born in the town of Seymour, Outagamie county, Wisconsin.

PHILIP NICKEL, one of the well known citizens of Seymour township, who is engaged in farming and stockraising on section 27, was born November 15, 1851, in Germantown, Wisconsin, a son of Philip and Catherine (Muehl) Nickel. Mr. Nickel's father was born June 22, 1822, in Kangerheim, Kreis Mainz, Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, and his wife at the same place, and they were married in Wisconsin. Mr. Nickel is still living, at Richland, being eighty-seven years of age, while Mrs. Nickel passed away in 1902, aged ,eighty years. Their children are as follows: Fred, who was born August 1, 1848; Jacob, December 7, 1849; Philip; John, September 12, 1853; Catherine, July 7, 1855; George, August 24, 1857; Henry, December 25, 1859; and William, February 24, 1862, and all are still living.

Philip Nickel had the opportunity to secure but a meager educational training in his youth, as his boyhood was spent in the hard work of the home farm, and as soon as he attained his majority he began to work on his own account, coming to Seymour with the railroad in 1871. Deciding upon an agricultural career, he located on the property which he now owns, then a wild waste of sixty acres, which he has since developed into a fertile, productive farm. He raises graded stock in addition to carrying on general farming, and his property is well-watered and equipped with substantial buildings and a handsome residence surrounded by a well-kept lawn. Mr. Nickel takes a keen interest in the public questions ot the day, but he has never aspired to office. On November 7, 1878, Mr. Nickel was married to Elizabeth Wolf, who was born July 18, 1854, at Neuhofen Bouern, Germany, daughter of Conrad and Elizabeth (Hidel) Wolf, natives of Rheinfeld Speyer, Germany. Mrs. Wolf died in September, 1898, aged seventy years, while Mr. Wolf is still living, having reached the advanced age of eighty-seven. Mr. and Mrs. Nickel have had three children, namely: Arthur Jacob, born February 13, 1881; Rufus Melvin, born January 1, 1885; and Lily, born November 19, 1887.

ALBERT KOLLETH. Those whose task it has been to enter a new territory, where the land is covered with brush and timber, where there are no roads, where the nearest neighbor is miles distant and the nearest base of supplies is even farther, and endeavor to put it under cultivation, can appreciate the hardships encountered by the pioneers who go forth into a new country to blaze the way for civilization. Albert Kolleth, a pioneer of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, has done his share in the development of this section of the State which has brought a vast wilderness into a land of plenty and prosperity. Mr. Kolleth was born in Pomerania, Germany, June 17, 1852, a son of Fred and Lotta Kolleth, who came to the United States in 1873 with their five children, Albert, Tena, Bertha, Herman and August. Four years previous to this time a daughter, Hannah, now the wife of August Halsey, had come to the United States, and two years afterwards a son, Charles, now of Osborn township, had emigrated to this country. On his arrival in America, Fred Kolleth made his way to Waukesha county, Wisconsin, and there he resided until his death in 1895, at the age of seventy years.

Albert Kolleth had just about reached maturity when he decided to strike out for himself, and his first five months away from home were spent in working on a farm near Richland, Wisconsin. He returned home for the winter, but in the following summer went to work six miles west of Menominee Falls, and continued to be so occupied during the following five summers. He then came to Outagalmie county and in partnership with his brother Charles began farming on sixty acres of wild land. The boys worked hard and persistently, cutting down the trees, uprooting the stumps and clearing the brush, until they had their original purchase under cultivation, when they purchased twenty acres more, and when the partnership was dissolved, four years later, each had a fine property of forty acres. About this time, in 1881, Albert Kolleth was married to Hannah Sewearth, and they continued to reside on this property for two years, when they purchased another forty-acre tract, and this Mr. Kolleth cleared and put under cultivation, also erecting a good house and barn. Later he purchased a tract of forty acres in Osborn township, which he worked into a first-class property, and after remaining here eleven years he purchased his present finely-improved farm on section 27, Seymour township, where he has since carried on general farming and stock raising. Mr. Kolleth is a successful farmer, and his success has been brought about by hard, unceasing labor. He is independent in politics, voting rather for the man than the party.

Mrs. Kolleth was born July 28, 1860, a daughter of Gottlieb and Minnie (Busse) Sewearth. Mr. Sewearth died in Germany, but the mother, desiring to give her children all of the advantages that lay in her power, bravely set forth for the United States with her family of twelve, bringing them to Richland, Wisconsin, where their uncle, Samuel Busse, had located some years before. At the time of her death, in 1896, at the age of sixty-six years, the mother had seen all of her children given a good start and fitted for whatever position in life they should be called upon to fill. The twelve children of Gottlieb and Minnie Sewearth were: Caroline, Martin, Gottlieb, Daniel, William, August, Gusta, Louis, Julia, Minnie, Hannah and Fred. Seven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kolleth: Arthur, August 17, 1881; Laura. September 14, 1883; William, May 26, 1885; Carrie, January 4, 1887; Amanda, November 2, 1889; Samuel, September 14, 1891; and Emma, April 17, 1893.

HENRY STURM, who in partnership with his brother is breeding some of the finest live stock ever raised in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, is also engaged in extensive general farming operations on section 28, Seymour township, and is a partner in the firm of Sturm Brothers Ice Company of the city of Seymour. Mr. Sturm is a native of Seymour township, having been born on the old Sturm family homestead here, April 6, 1877, a son of August and Bertha (Heiling) Sturm, natives of Pomerania, Germany, where the former was born January 22, 1844 and the latter December 21, 1840. The sailing vessel on which they came to the United States in 1868 landed at New York City, and from that place they came West to Door county, Wisconsin, whence Mr. Sturm's brother William had preceded him, but after three years spent on a forty-acre tract there they removed to Seymour township, Outagamie county, ana settled on the present farm of Albert Brugger, on section 27. A small clearing had been made here, and the first family home was a little log cabin, but Mr. Sturm soon had the entire property under cultivation and added by successive purchases to the land until he had 160 acres, all in section 28, he disposing of the original forty acres in section 27. After many years of hard and conscientious labor, Mr. Sturm succeeded in getting his land into a cultivated state, and at the time of his death, in 1905, when he was sixty-one years of age had one of the finest and best stocked properties in the township. Mr. Sturm was one of the prominent public men of his day, holding every township office in the gift of the people, and was also a leading member of the German Methodist Church, to which he subscribed with a liberal hand. He married Bertha Heiling, daughter of Fred and Gusta (Krause) Heiling. Mr. Heiling was a wagonmaker in Germany, and neither he nor his wife ever left the Fatherland, nor did any of their children with the exception of Bertha, whose brothers and sisters were: August, Charles, Julius, Fred, Ludwig and Hannah. Mrs. Sturm is still living and makes her home with her sons on the old family .homestead. To Mr. and Mrs. Sturm there were born the following children: Matilda, who married Charles Schauer; August; Lizzie, who married Ed Fiedler; Emma, who married Fred Young; Albert H., and Henry.

Henry Sturm received his education in the district schools and remained with his father on the home farm, where after his father's death he formed a partnership with his brother Albert H., and also rents adjoining land. The brothers raise fine Percheron horses, thoroughbred Short Horn cattle, Oxford sheep and Poland-China hogs. Their business is one of the largest of its kind in Outagamie county, and has increased steadily every year. The brothers deal in all kinds of live stock, but they have made a specialty of horses, and now have a team which they value at more than $1,600. In addition to their live stock and farming interests the Sturm Brothers are the proprietors of an ice business and have a large trade in Seymour.

ALBERT H. STURM, senior member of the firm of Sturm Brothers Ice Company of Seymour, Wisconsin, general farmer and stockraiser of Seymour township, and owner of some of the finest thoroughbred horses and cattle in the State, was born on the old homestead farm in Seymour township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, a son of August and Bertha (Heiling) Sturm. August Sturm was born January 22, 1844, in Pomerania, Germany, and was married in 1864 to Bertha Heiling, who was born at the same place December 21, 1840. They came to the United States in 1868 to join Mr. Sturm's brother William, and located in Door county, Wisconsin, on a tract of forty acres of wild land on which there had been erected a little log cabin. They remained on this place until 1871, in which year they moved to Seymour township, Outagamie county, and located on the present farm of Albert Brugger on section 27, on which at that time there was but a small clearing, a small frame house and a shaky log barn. After putting all of this land under cultivation, Mr. Sturm bought a forty-acre tract across the road, in section 28, which he also improved and three or four years later bought another piece of forty acres adjoining, which had ten acres cleared. He then sold the forty acres in section 27 and purchased eighty acres adjoining his property on section 28, and he finally put the whole 160 acres under cultivation, erected fine houses and barns and stocked it with thoroughbred cattle. Here he spent the remainder of his life, his death occurring in 1905, when he was sixty-one years of age. Mr. Sturm was a Republican in politics, and held every township office within the gift of the people. He was a stanch member of the German Methodist Church. Mrs. Sturm was a daughter of Fred and Gusta (Krause) Heiling, the former of whom was a wagonmaker in Germany, where his death occurred in 1878, when he was sixty-one years of age, his widow surviving him until 1896 and being seventy-eight years of age at the time of her demise. They had seven children: Bertha, August, Charles, Julius, Fred, Ludwig and Hannah, but Bertha was the only one of the family to come to this country. Mr. and Mrs. Sturm had the following children: Matilda, born February 12, 1869, married Charles Schauer, by whom she had one child, Arnold, and is now deceased; August, born August 20, 1880; Lizzie, born April 19, 1871, married Ed Fiedler, by whom she had three children, Dewey, Edna and Lillian and is now deceased; Emma, born June 10, 1873, married Fred Young of Cumberland, Wisconsin; Albert H., born April 24, 1875, and Henry, born April 6, 1877.

Albert H. Sturm was educated in the public schools of Seymour township, and at the early age of fourteen years started out to make his own way in the world. He worked out until he had reached the age of twenty-one years, when he returned home and purchased eighty acres of land from his father, adjoining the old homestead, and here he has made extensive improvements to those made by his father, and in partnership with his brother Henry is now the owner of some of the finest teams in the county. They make a specialty of raising fine cattle, hogs and sheep, but pay the most attention to raising horses, and they have a team now which they have repeatedly refused as much as $1,600 for, a pair of draft animals the equal of which it would be hard to find in the State. In 1904, Mr. Sturm was married to Pauline Eurlope, who was born in Germany, and was the adopted daughter of William Dammon, who located in Seymour township in 1867, and two children have been born to this union: Alta and Maynard.

ALBERT BRUGGER, who is engaged in agricultural operations on an excellent property on section 27, Seymour township, is one of the substantial men of his district, and has served in public office in Outagamie county for the past quarter of a century. Mr. Brugger was born in Washington county, Wisconsin, July 26, 1851, a son of Leonard and Mary (Bartman) Brugger, natives of Baden, Germany. They were married in the old country, and in 1848 started for the United States in a sailing vessel, with their two children, Charles Frederick and Beatrice, and before the family had finished its journey of over 100 days on the ocean, nearly all were suffering from the pangs of hunger. After arriving in the United States, Mr. Brugger brought his little family to Washington county, Wisconsin, and settled on a farm of seventy acres on which an old log cabin had been built. Here Mr. Brugger started to make a home for himself and family, clearing the land from the tangle of the wilderness, and carrying flour on his back from the mill fourteen miles away. He erected a new barn and a house of hewed logs covered with plaster, which made it resemble a concrete house. Later he sold out and removed to Fond du Lac county, but after a few years there moved to Menasha, Wisconsin, where his death occurred in 1883, when he was about seventy-three years old. His wife died in 1906, when she had reached the advanced age of eighty-eight years. Their children were: Charles Frederick, born in Germany, who died in Washington county; Beatrice, also born in the Fatherland, who married John Witshick; and Emma, Albert and Minnie, born in the United States, of whom the last-named is deceased.

Albert Brugger was only fifteen years of age when he went to work for himself, learning the trade of blacksmith at Richfield, Washington county. He first found employment at Gills Landing, and later worked at Green Bay, and in 1872 came to Seymour and built one of the first blacksmith shops in this city. After working at his trade for two or three years, he secured forty acres of wild land in Osborne township, and soon cleared it and replaced the broken-down buildings with substantial and modern ones. When he left this property to come to the one which he now occupies, he had one of the finest farms in that part of Osborn township, and had added to it until he owned 173 acres. Mr. Brugger's present farm is one of the fine ones of Seymour township, and its well-kept appearance testifies to the thrift and good management of its owner. In his political views Mr. Brugger is a Democrat, and during the past twenty-five or thirty years has been almost constantly in office, having served on the school board, as assessor, treasurer and chairman of the town of Osborn and trustee of asylum of Outagamie county. He is a director in the Security Loan and Trust Company of Seymour and director in the Cicero Mutual Fire Insurance Company.

In 1874, Mr. Brugger was married to Margaret Klaus, who was born June 1, 1851, in Germany, daughter of Jacob and Magdeline (Kochens) Klaus, who spent their lives in Germany. Mrs. Brugger came to the United States in 1873. She and her husband have had five children: Josephena, Leonard, Irwin, Bert and Emma, of whom the last-named is deceased.

HENRY G. KRAUSE, the owner of an excellent farming property of 107 acres situated in Seymour township, is one of the self-made men of Outagamie county, where he has spent more than twenty years in farming and stock raising. Mr. Krause was born February 18, 1863, in Prussia, Germany, a son of Gottlieb and Wilhelmina (Filbrandt) Krause. The parents of Mr. Krause came to the United States in 1866 in a sailing vessel which took nine weeks to make the journey, and Gottlieb Krause for the following four years worked at various occupations, although his trade was that of a tailor. In 1870 he came to Seymour township and settled on eighty acres of wild land on section 33, where he erected a good frame dwelling and carried on farming until his death in 1910, when eighty-five years of age. He helped to organize the German Evangelical Church at Seymour, was a member of the school board for some years and was highly esteemed by all with whom he came into contact. His widow, who survives him, is eighty-six years old. Gottlieb and Wilhelmina Krause had the following children: Mary, Charles, August W., Johanna, Henry G. and Ida, of whom only the last-named was born in the United States.

Henry G. Krause was educated in the district schools and was yet a youth when he started out to make his own way in the world. He occupied himself at various employments until his marriage in 1887 to Johanna Meiske, and during the year following located on his present property, then a tract of sixty-seven acres, twenty-eight of which had been cleared. He at once settled down to clear and cultivate his property, replacing the old log buildings with new, substantial ones, and making his property one of the valuable farms of Seymour township. Mr. Krause has never been assisted in any way, and the success that has crowned his efforts has been due to his own perseverance and industry. Mr. Krause has for some years been engaged in cattle raising, and he has a fine herd of Holsteins and Short Horns, the latter receiving the most of his attention. In political matters he is a Republican, and although he has held the position of school director he has never aspired to public office, preferring to give his time and attention to his farming interests. The family attends the Congregational Church.

Mrs. Krause was one of the nine children of Fred and Minnie (Sastro) Meiske, who settled at Watertown, Wisconsin, in 1868. To Mr. and Mrs. Krause there have been born seven children: Robert, who lives at home; Ella and Louisa, school teachers of Seymour township; Henry; Eicha and Gertrude, living at home; and Wilbert, who died at the age of three months.

AUG W. KRAUSE, a representative agriculturalist of Outagamie county who is carrying on operations on his fine farm on section 33, in Seymour township, was born February 7, 1857, in Germany, a son of Gottlieb and Wilhelmina (Filbrandt) Krause. His parents were natives of the Fatherland and immigrated to the United States on board a sailing vessel in 1866, the journey requiring nine weeks. Gottlieb Krause was a tailor by trade, but after settling at Watertown, Jefferson county, Wisconsin, he worked at whatever occupation presented itself. In 1870, he came to Outagamie county and settled on eighty acres of wild land on section 33, Seymour township, and here built a good. frame house in which to live, cleared the land and carried on agricultural pursuits until his retirement. He died in 1910, at eighty-five years of age. Mr. Krause was of a strong religious turn of mind, a member of the German Evangelical Lutheran Church and helped to organize the church of that denomination at Seymour. He was also a member of the school board at the latter place. Mrs. Krause, who survives her husband, has attained the age of eighty-six years. Their family consisted of the following children: Mary, Charles, August W., Johanna, Henry and Ida, all born in Germany except the one last named.

Aug. W. Krause received a good German parochial school education, and by observation and much reading he has also acquired a good knowledge of English. As a youth his time was employed in assisting his father on the farm and at working in a sawmill, but in 1884, he purchased his father's farm of 94 acres to which he has since added until he now owns a valuable tract of 207 acres. Here he has since lived, and with the passing of time has made many substantial improvements in the way of orchards, shrubbery, buildings and a fine cement silo. During the last fifteen years, in addition to carrying on general farming, he has given much attention to the breeding of Holstein cattle, and his undertakings along both lines have been uniformly successful. For some years past Mr. Krause has been school clerk of his district, and is now serving as its treasurer. About ten years ago he helped organize the Farmer's Home Mutual Hail, Tornado & Cyclone Insurance Company of which he has been a director from its inception. He is a member of the German Lutheran Church of which he has been a trustee for twenty years, treasurer for a long period and is now the secretary. In 1884, Mr. Krause married Anna Bertschy, daughter of Jacob and Charlotta Bertschy, and to this union there have been born the following children: Alma, who married Phillip Luthart; Hannah, who became the wife of Robert Pautz; Oscar, Martha, Arthur, Ernest, August, Reuben and Irene. Jacob Bertschy, the father of Mrs. Krause, was born in Germany near the line bordering on France. He came to the United States during his earlier years and settled at Racine, Wisconsin, where he married Charlotta, Boos. They subsequently made their home at Meeme, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin.

AMAY P. BAYORGEON, who is proprietor of a meat market at Kaukauna, Wisconsin, enjoying an excellent trade and prospering as a business man, was born at Canada, in 1861, and is a son of Paul and Matilda Bayorgeon. The family is of French descent and came to the United States from Canada. The father was an invalid for the last sixteen years of his life and died in 1871. The mother was married secondly to Isaac Fournier and they reside at Minneapolis, Minn., she being aged eighty-three years. To her first marriage two sons and two daughters were born and two of the children survive. In the public schools Amay P. Bayorgeon obtained his education and as soon as he was old enough to work with tools, learned shingle making and afterward the carpenter trade and was employed at Minneapolis until 1883, when he came to Kaukauna, Wisconsin. Here he went into the meat business, opening a butcher shop in partnership with Mr. Brefontine, in the following year buying his partner's interest.

Mr. Bayorgeon was married May 17, 1886, to Miss Mary Curtin, of Kaukauna, and they have had ten children, one of whom is deceased. With his family Mr. Bayorgeon belongs to the Holy Cross Roman Catholic Church. He belongs also to the great Catholic organization, the Knights of Columbus, and for the past twenty years has been a member of the Foresters.

KARL F. GEORGE BRENNER, a well known citizen of Kaukauna, Wisconsin, where he is extensively engaged in the fuel business, was born in Germany, February 24, 1845, and is a son of John and Mary (Lentz) Brenner. Mrs. Brenner died when Karl was but a boy, and the family came to the United States in 1865, whence Mr. Brenner's brother, George Phillip had preceded them some years. The latter, who was a minister of the Lutheran Church, had a congregation at Oshkosh. Karl received his early education in Germany, and after coming to this country attended a seminary at Addison, Illinois, after which, from 1870 until 1900, he was engaged in teaching school, in Hustisford, Dodge county, Fond du Lac, Neenah and in Kaukauna. In 1900 he entered the coal and wood business with Ed Grebe, and they now have the leading business of its kind in this city. On October 11, 1870, Mr. Brenner was married to Barbara Werner, who was born near Milwaukee, daughter of George and Barbara (Milins) Werner, and they have had six children; Charles G. F., who is a teacher in the Lutheran school at Kaukauna; John, a Lutheran minister, residing in Milwaukee; Lydia, who married Ed Grebe; Ida, who married Carl Guse, of Cudahy, Wisconsin; Anna, assistant postmistress at Cudahy; and Martha, who married Harry Brown, a resident of Spokane, Washington. Mr. and Mrs. Brenner are members of the Lutheran Church. Mr. Brenner is public spirited to a high degree and takes a great interest in any movement that promises the betterment of Kaukauna in any way. He is one of the first members of the library board, to which body he still belongs, and he has always been a great advocate of the cause of education.


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11-Oct-2004