Part 10 | History of Outagamie County, Wisconsin. Thomas Henry Ryan. Part 11 | Part 12

BIOGRAPHY AND REMINISCENCE

CAPTAIN JOSEPH H. MARSTON, one of the old and honest citizens of Outagamie County, Wisconsin, who for many years has been closely identified with the business and public interests of the city of Appleton, has a distinguished record for service during the great Civil war. Captain Marston was born June 1, 1829, in Deerfield, New Hampshire, and is a son of George H. and Lucretia D. (Hilton) Marston, natives of New Hampshire of English descent. The family came to Wisconsin in 1843, by the Erie Canal and Great Lakes, and George H. Marston pre-empted one-quarter of a section of land near Kenosha, at a time when the Indians in this region were more plentiful than white men. In April, 1850, Mr. Marston, Sr., came to Appleton, where he engaged in painting, and for many years up to the time of his death served as justice of the peace. He died in the faith of the Baptist Church, when seventy-eight years old. In politics he was a Democrat. Nine children were born to George H. and Lucretia Marston, namely: Dr. S. L., a graduate of Rush Medical College and for many years a medical practitioner. Dr. S. L. Marston was surgeon of the Twelfth Wisconsin, and was with Sherman in his march to the sea. Residence, Hartford, Wisconsin; now deceased. Captain Joseph H., Appleton; Eliza and John, residing in Omaha, Nebraska; Adelaide, residing in Denver, Colorado; Susan, residing near Seattle, Washington; Robey D., who died at Roanoke Island while in the marine service during the Civil war; Josephine, who is deceased, and Martha, who is residing at Butte, Montana.

Joseph H. Marston received his education in the public schools of Kenosha county, came to Appleton in 1852 and enlisted in May,1861, in Company E, Sixth Wisconsin Infantry, "The Iron Brigade," he being commissioned second lieutenant, being later made first lieutenant, and, September 17, 1862, after the battle of Antietam, captain, with which rank he was mustered out of service, March 19, 1864, on account of disability. Among the many bloody battles in which he participated may be mentioned Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Chancellorsville and Gettysburg. He was wounded by a gunshot in his head at South Mountain and was reported among the killed, notice being sent to Appleton to that effect; at Gettysburg a shell exploded at Captain Marston's feet, but the only injury he sustained was a sprained ankle, although he was thrown into the air; and at Antietam he was wounded in the leg. In addition, his experiences included being captured at Gettysburg and escaped with others after the three days' battle.

The following is an extract from a letter received from Col. R. R. Dawes, commanding the Sixth Wisconsin Regiment at the battle of Gettysburg:

"My Dear Captain Marston: I notice that you are appointed with others to go to Gettysburg to locate the monument for the 6th Wis. Reg't. I can at this time see your tall form and firm step as you pressed Co. E forward on a charge through that fearful storm of death. How they failed to kill you has always been a mystery to me. I expect to meet you at Gettysburg."

The color guards formed a part of Captain Marston's Company in this battle, in which he lost more than half of his men in killed and wounded. It was in this charge that the 2d Mississippi Regiment was captured by the 6th Wisconsin.

After completing his service, he returned to Appleton, where he engaged in the manufacture of wagon stock in company with R. Z. Mason, former president of Lawrence University; an enterprise in which he is still engaged.

In 1854 Captain Marston was united in marriage with Miss Louise B. Belding, who came to Appleton from Hardwick, Vermont, with her brother, and she died in 1892, having been the mother of five children: Quincy, who is in the coal business in Appleton with his brother Charles, Cora, Russell and Myrtie, deceased. Captain Marston is a member of Waverly Lodge No. 51, and Appleton Chapter No. 47 of the Masonic fraternity, and is an honored comrade of George D. Eggleston Post No. 33, Grand Army of the Republic, having been one of the incorporators of the Wisconsin Soldiers' Home, and for ten years a trustee thereof. He has held numerous public offices and for two terms served as mayor of Appleton.

ALBERT M. SPENCER, a prominent member of the Outagamie legal profession, who is actively engaged in practice in the city of Appleton, was born July 26, 1856, in Bovina township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and is a son of Blanchard and Emily (Curtis) Spencer. Blanchard Spencer came from New York to Wisconsin in 1850, where he engaged in lumbering, and the rest of his life was spent in this locality. After attending the public schools, Albert M. Spencer went to, the Ryan High School, and then read law under Judge Harriman and Sloan & Bottenscher, being admitted to the bar in 1883. During the next year he was elected to the office of district attorney and was re-elected in 1886, but retired from that office in 1887 and went to Superior, Wisconsin, where he remained eight years. In April, 1896, he returned to Appleton, after having taken a trip through Colorado and Arizona, and he has been here to this time, having served in the office of city attorney for three terms. He has a large and lucrative practice, and is well and favorably known both in his profession and as a public-spirited citizen and official.

In November, 1887, Mr. Spencer was united in marriage with Helene Sherwood, of Green Lake county, Wisconsin, and she died in 1896, having been the mother of two children: Harold, a mid-shipman of Annapolis, Maryland, connected with the United States Diplomatic Service in Africa; and Loraine, who is attending the University and residing at home. Mr. Spencer is a Republican in his political views.

WILSON S. PATTERSON, president of the W. S. Patterson Company, contractors for plumbing and heating, and jobbers of pipe, fittings, valves and steam supplies, at No. 737 College Avenue, Appleton, Wisconsin, is one of Appleton's well known business men. He was born at Omro, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, September 6, 1856, a son of Abraham and Josephine (Shaler) Patterson, and a grandson of Major Ephriam Shaler, who at one time had charge of Fort Howard. Abraham Patterson was born in Rochester, New York, and came to Wisconsin in the '40s, locating in Appleton in 1886, after he had conducted hardware stores in various places, and here both he and his wife died. They had five children, all of whom are living. Wilson S. Patterson first established his present business in 1886, and it has been successful from the start, now occupying a two-story factory 26x140 feet, in which are employed twenty-seven hands. The officers of the company are W. S. Patterson, president; Conrad Verbrick, vice-president, and H. C. Getschow, secretary and treasurer. The product of the company includes plumbing and heating fixtures, pipe, fittings and steam supplies, and the Atwood vacuum cleaner apparatus, and goods are shipped all over the surrounding country.

Mr. Patterson was married in 1884, at Hortonia, Wisconsin, to Letitia Lily Cuff, born October 11, 1862, daughter of Alexander and Maria (Ouffe) Cuff, farming people of Hortonia township, Outagamie county. Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Patterson, five sons and five daughters. Mr. and Mrs. Patterson and their children are members of the Congregational Church. He is a Republican in national politics, but in local affairs votes independently. His fraternal connections are with the Equitable Fraternal Union and several other fraternal societies. For some years Mr. Patterson served as secretary of the Wisconsin Master Plumbers' Association.

SOLOMON R. WAGG, superintendent and secretary of the Fox River Paper Company's mills at Appleton, Wisconsin, has won a reputation that is international as an inventor of paper making machinery, and has been intimately connected, with the business of paper making for a long period of years. Born in Cumberland, Maine, January 2, 1846, he moved at three and one-half years of age to Yarmouth, Cumberland county, Maine. Mr. Wagg is a son of Elbridge G. and Hannah (Reed) Wagg, and a grandson of Samuel Wagg. The family was founded in 1750, in which year the first to settle in this country came from England to the New England States. Samuel Wagg was a soldier during the Revolutionary War, in which he served seven years, and his pension papers, signed by John C. Calhoun, are kept as valued family possessions by his descendants. Elbridge G. Wagg was born in Auburn, Maine, and in November, 1844, was married at Cumberland Center to Miss Hannah Reed, daughter of William and Margaret Reed, farming people of that section. Mr. Reed was also a seafaring man, and his father, William Reed, was a man of much means, loaning money to the Federal Government during the Revolutionary War, which, it is claimed, was never repaid. Elbridge G. Wagg was a farmer and schoolteacher, was superintendent of schools of Cumberland county for ten years, and was twice elected to the State Legislature. He was a cousin of ex-Governor and Later Congressman Dingley of Maine, through his mother, who was a Miss Dingley. Of the eight children of Mr. and Mrs. Ellbridge G. Wagg, Solomon R. was the oldest.

Solomon R. Wagg worked on his father's farm during the summers and attended the schools of his district during the winters until he had attained the age of seventeen years, at which time he accepted a position as railroad baggagemaster, and after two years began learning the trade of papermaker in a mill at Yarmouth. In 1871 he went to Adams, Massachusetts, entering the employ of the L. L. Brown Paper Co., with which he continued seven years, during which time he learned every detail of the business. After working in other mills in Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Ohio and New York, Mr. Wagg in 1884 came West to Wisconsin, locating in Neenah, where he became superintendent of the Kimberly, Clark & Company's mill, but after two years resigned to take a like position at the Fox River Paper Company's mills, where.he has since been employed. The great store of knowledge which Mr. Wagg had accumulated during his many years of experience in paper mills of every size and kind in the country, assisted him in making this mill one of the finest in the United States, its growth under his management being little short of phenomenal, while his inventions were also great helps in increasing the capacity of the plant. In 1887 he patented a sulphide digestor lining, and later inventions were a Jorden engine, which has been sold all over the world; a stone lining for a paper engine, a big improvement over past methods, which is already in use in numerous mills, and about twenty improvements and patents on paper making engines. He is an honorary member of the Academy of Science, Paris, France, which membership was granted him as inventor of certain articles used in the art of paper making. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in politics he is a Republican, but he has never desired to attain public preferment. He has, however, devoted a great deal of time to temperance work, being associated with Father Fitzmaurice and others.

In 1873 Mr. Wagg was married to Sarah Ling, who was born in Odletown, Province of Quebec, Canada, daughter of Abram and Elizabeth Ling. Four children were born to this union; namely: Angie, Frederick, William and James. Frederick died from typhoid fever, August, 1900, aged 24 years.

ABE 0. DANIELSON, clerk of the Circuit and Municipal Courts of Outagamie county, who was for many years engaged in business enterprises in Appleton, was born at Neenah, Wisconsin, November 9, 1862, and is a son of George and Anna (Olson) Danielson, the former of Christiana and the latter of Bergen, Norway. George Danielson was born June 14, 1834, and received a common school education in Norway. At the age of twenty years he came to the United States, settling at Neenah, Wisconsin, where he remained until 1856, and in that year removed to Rock county. In 1861 he returned to Neenah, where he was extensively engaged as a millwright, contractor and manufacturer of pulp, and was there elected town treasurer in 1872, city treasurer in 1873, 1874 and 1877, and 1904 to 1906, alderman one term, school commissioner two terms and assessor one term, and in 1892 was sent to represent his district in the State Assembly. He died September 5, 1909, and Mrs. Danielson followed him to the grave, August 13, 1910. They had a family of six children, as follows: Isabelle, born July 18, 1861, residing in Denver; Abe O., Daniel O., born February 18, 1864, who is engaged in traveling; Martin J., born May 3, 1865, engaged in contracting; Josephine, born April 3, 1867, residing in Portland, Ore., and Mattie L., born March 4, 1869, also living in Portland. Abe 0. Danielson received his education in the public schools, and from 1889 until 1894 was engaged in contracting with his father. During the latter year he became connected with Shattuck & Babcock, at De Pere, where he remained for two years as bookkeeper, and from 1896 until 1905 was in the retail lumber business on his own account, and later with the Appleton Lumber and Fuel Company. .From October 28, 1907, until April, 1909, Mr. Danielson was with the Worden Lumber Company, and on May 22, 1909, he was appointed clerk of the Circuit and Municipal Courts by Judge John Goodland, receiving the election to that office November 8, 1910, for a term of two years. On April 21, 1887, Mr. Danielson was married to Tina Rhode, a daughter of Michael and Elizabeth Rhode, farming people of Portage county, and one son has been born to this union, George N., who is deputy clerk of the courts. Mr. Danielson's wife and son attended the Congregational church. While he is not a member of any especial denomination, he is always ready to support movements of a church or charitable nature, just as he has always given of his time and means to further movements which have had for their object the business welfare of his community. His politics are those of the Democratic party, and fraternally he is connected with the E. F. U.

JOHN A. MORSE, a prominent business citizen of Shiocton, Wisconsin, who has been engaged in the lumber business in Outagamie county during a period covering forty-four years, was born in New Hampshire, March 31, 1848. Early in life he decided that better opportunities were offered the ambitious young man in the West, and he came to Wisconsin in 1867, locating in Outagamie county and engaging in the lumbering and logging business, in which he has been engaged to the present time. He was married in 1870, to Miss Effie J. Main, who was born in the Dominion of Canada in 1850, and they have had a family of three children, namely: Glen, who met an accidental death in 1909; Clifford, of Shiocton, who is married and has two children, and John F., residing on a fruit ranch in Idaho. Mr. Morse is a member of the Masonic fraternity and in politics he is a Republican, but he has never aspired to public office. With his wife he attends the Congregational church.

ALEXANDER LAIRD, who has been closely identified with the agricultural interests of Outagamie county for a number of years, is now living retired on his fine farm in Ellington township, which is being operated by his son. He was born January 11, 1840, near Belfast, Ireland, and received his education in that vicinity, although he had to leave school at the age of fourteen years to take charge of the home farm, his father, William Laird, having died. When he was seventeen years of age he left the Emerald Isle and came to the United States with his mother, brothers and sisters, and from Fond du Lac, at which city the road stopped, the little party walked to Ellington township. The mother purchased land in Bovina township, Outagamie county, and Mr. Laird worked on that property for twelve years. In 1868, Mr. Laird returned to Ireland, where he was married to Agnes Jamison, a native of that country, and on their return to the United States they settled on Mr. Laird's present home in Ellington township. For many years Mr. Laird was engaged in mixed farming and dairying, but he has now given up active work and is living a quiet life, enjoying the fruits of his early labors. He has lived to see the country grow from a vast stretch of wilderness to a flourishing, prosperous country, and his own farm develop from so many acres of heavy timber to one of the finest farming lands in Ellington township. In 1906 he erected the present handsome residence, and other good buildings grace this tract. Mr. Laird has been a member of the township board for several terms. He and Mrs. Laird are consistent members of the Congregational church, and have been the parents of seven children, namely: Elizabeth, Agnes, William L., Letta, John, Alexander and Katherine. Alexander Laird is now operating the old homestead farm.

CHARLES WUNDERLICH, one of Ellington township's substantial citizens, and the owner of a well cultivated tract of farming land, was born on his father's farm in Ellington township, October 22, 1864, and is a son of Christopher Wunderlich. Christopher Wunderlich, who was a native of Germany, came to this country at the age of twelve years with his parents, the family settling first in Milwaukee, in which city he grew to manhood. During the '50s he came to Ellington township, purchasing wild land, which he cleared from the timber and cultivated into an excellent farm. For many years he was engaged in farming here, and in 1905 he retired from active life and went to Appleton, in which city he and his wife now reside. Charles Wunderlich received a good district school education, and began to learn the rudiments of farming when still a small boy, assisting his father and brothers in cultivating the home place. He has always worked in this district with the exception of a few years before his marriage, when he was engaged in cultivating some land he owned in Minnesota, but he eventually returned to the home farm. He rented the property here until 1906, when he purchased the farm he now owns, and he carries on general farming along scientific lines. Mr. Wiunderlich is well versed in crop rotation and an advocate of the use of the latest and most highly improved farming machinery, and the appearance of his property gives evidence of excellent management. In November, 1905, Mr. Wunderlich was married to Miss Martha Discher, who was born in Neenah, Wisconsin, in May, 1881, and they have had two children, namely: Harvey, who died at the age of one and one-half years, and Howard, who was born in March, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Wunderlich are faithful members of the German Lutheran Church of Ellington.

JOHN SPEARS, who carries on general farming operations in Ellington township, and makes a specialty of breeding high grade Guernsey cattle, is a native of Outagamie county and a son of John Spears, who was born in England. John Spears, the father, came to America when twenty-five years of age, and during the ten years that followed he lived at various places in the United States. He came to Outagamie county in 1858, buying land in Ellington township, on which he resided for many years, but eventually sold and moved on the farm now owned by his son, and here his death occurred in 1905. He was married in 1868 to Elmira Elliott, born in 1842, in Wisconsin, of English parentage, her father having been a participant in the War of 1812, and she died on the farm in 1895. Mr. Spears enlisted for service in the Federal army during the War of the Rebellion, and at its close received an honorable discharge. He and his wife had three boys and two girls, all living except one, who died in infancy. John Spears was born in 1869, on his father's farm, and he received his education in the district schools of the neighborhood, his youth being spent much the same as that of other farmer's boys of that time. He continued to work on his father's farm until he was twenty years of age, at which time he started out to make his own way in the world and took charge of his father's property, which he purchased in 1896. He does general farming and dairying, making a specialty of Guernsey cattle, and he is a prominent member of the Guernsey Cattle Breeders' Association. He is progressive in his political views and has served for upwards of fifteen years as road commissioner. His religious connection is with the Congregational Church of Illington, in which he is deacon and superintendent of the Sunday school. Mr. Spears has never married.

JOHN JAMES NIELAND, who is operating a tract of 135 acres in Grand Chute township as a general and dairy farm, is one of this section's good, practical agriculturists. He was born in Greenville township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, August 15, 1871, and is a son of John and Rachael (Burr) Nieland, natives of Germany, the father born in Mecklenburg, September 15, 1834, and the mother in Preisen, September 17, 1834. John Nieland came to the United States with his parents in 1857 and located at Manitowoc, where Mr. Nieland worked in a sawmill until the family removed to Dale township, Outagamie county and located on a forty-acre farm. He worked for farmers in this vicinity until his enlistment, in August, 1862, in Company I, Thirty-second Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and with this organization he served two years and ten months, being mustered out of the service at Washington, D. C. Mr. Nieland had an excellent war record, and was never wounded nor confined to the hospital. He had married in May, 1862, before going to the front, and after his services were completed he returned to his home and soon thereafter settled on a farm in Greenville township, on which he remained about nine years. He eventually sold this and bought a farm in Dale township, and on this eighty-acre tract he continued to live twenty-one years, when he sold out and retired to Appleton, where he now lives in his residence at No. 1265 Oneida street. Mrs. Nieland died November 5, 1909. They were the parents of seven children: Ernest and John, who are deceased; Carrie, wife of William Schroeder, of Greenville township, a farmer; Henry, married, a resident of South Division street, Appleton; John James, married; Louis, a resident of Maple street, Appleton, and Frederick, who lives with his father.

John James Nieland received his education in school district No. 2, Dale township, and at the age of twenty years took charge of the homestead farm, which he conducted for four years. He then engaged in a sawmill business at Hartland, Shawano county, for about two years, when a disastrous fire destroyed his plant, and during the next eight years he worked for others, trying to recuperate his losses. At the end of this period Mr. Nieland rented a farm in Grand Chute township for about five years, since which time he has operated his present 135-acre tract as a general and dairy farm. He keeps a number of fine dairy cattle, and his property is fitted with a full complement of up-to-date equipments. He has given his entire attention to his farming operations, and is now considered one of Grand Chute township's substantial agriculturists. Mr. Nieland is fraternally connected with the Modern Woodmen at Appleton.

On September 16, 1896, Mr. Nieland was united in marriage with Miss Anna Haefs, who was born December 27, 1877, in Kewanee county, Wisconsin, daughter of Herman and Gusta (Krueger) Haefs, natives of Pommerin, Germany, where the father was born June 1, 1855, and the mother December 10, 1859. Mr. Haefs came to the United States when he was fourteen years of age, and located at Mayville, Dodge county. He grew to maturity on his father's rented farm in Shawano county, where he later became a landowner, and he is still residing there on a farm, although he has practically retired from farming activities. Mr. and Mrs. Haefs had a family of children as follows: Anna, who married Mr. Nieland; Charles, a farmer of Montana; Hulda, who married Frank Hiller, a farmer of Hartland township, Shawano county; August, a lumber grader of Gresham, Wisconsin; Mary, who married Peter Hoppensberger, a watchman in the paper mill at Combined Locks; Benjamin, a tinner of Bondwell, Shawano county; Elmer, who resides in Gresham, and one who died in infancy. To Mr. and Mrs. Nieland there have been born five children: Hazel Myrtle, born August 24, 1897; Chester Harold, born November 17, 1899; Lucile Bessie, born March 24, 1905; Ivor Charles, born December 21, 1907, and Ethel May, born May 28, 1909.

FRANK PETERS, who is cultivating a fine farm of 100 acres in Greenville township, Outagamie county, has been engaged in various occupations since reaching years of maturity, and has now settled down to an agricultural life in which he is having much success. Born in Center township, Outagamie county, May 7, 1871, Mr. Peters is a son of Fred Peters. He attended public school in Appleton, and district school in Center township, and at the age of twenty years he learned the butcher business in Appleton, following that occupation for about one year in that city and then going to Minnesota, where he spent a like period working for others. Returning ts Appleton, he was engaged in tending bar for one year, and he was then married and moved to Kaukauna, where he was engaged in railroad work for about a year, after which he operated a farm in Greenville township for a period of five years. At this time he bought a general merchandise store at Greenville Station, but after less than two years was burned out, and he then rented a building and engaged in the saloon business for six months, when he went to West Bloomfield, Waushara county, and for the two years that followed was the proprietor of a hotel. At this time Mr. Peters came to his present location in Greenville township, where he has an excellent general dairy and stock farm of 100 acres. He was married May 30, 1894, to Miss Mary Knaack, who was born in Ellington township, September 23, 1876, and they have had the following children: Ervin P., born December 10, 1894; Louis, born July 6, 1896; Loreta, born October 15, 1897; Celia, born October 21, 1900; Chester, born Aprill 25, 1902; Viola, born June 14, 1905; Lulu, born October 11, 1907; Victor, born April 18, 1909; and Harold, born October 19, 1910. All of the children are living at home with the exception of Victor, who died June 18, 1909. The family is connected with the Lutheran Church.

WILLIAM MEWS, one of the self-made men of Greenville township, who is operating a farm of ninety-two acres, is a native of Pomerania, Germany, where he was born March 16, 1855, a son of Gottlieb and Caroline Charlotte (Yokes) Mews, natives of the Fatherland. The family came to America in 1856, and located in Milwaukee, where Mr. Mews worked on railroad construction work for a few years and later moved to Alma, Wisconsin, thence to Hudson Prairie, and subsequently to Dunn county, where he resided until 1881. Mr. Mews was well and favorably known in Dunn county and served in various public offices. He and his wife had nine children, of whom William was the fourth in order of birth. William Mews received but a. limited education in the schools of Dunn county, and in 1881 left home and went to Neenah, where he worked on a farm for one year and in a paper mill for ten months. He then came to Maine township, Outagamie county, buying a farm in the woods, and during his eight years' residence there cleared the property and developed a good farm. Selling this land, he removed to Ellington township and spent one summer on a rented farm, after which he came to Greenville township and for five and one-half years rented a farm situated two and one-half miles south of his present property. He then rented the farm he now operates for one year, at the end of which time he purchased it, and he now has one of the best farms of its size in this part of Greenville township. He devotes himself to general farming, and also does some dairying, disposing of his milk to the cheese factories of his neighborhood. Mr. Mews is a member of the Evangelical Association. In politics he is independent, and while a resident of Maine township served as a member of the school board. On October 30, 1879, Mr. Mews was married to Miss Margaret Stroebel, who was born in Hebron township, Jefferson county, Wisconsin, August 12, 1857, daughter of Fred and Barbara (Lang) Stroebel. Fred Stroebel was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, July 27, 1824, and his wife in Byern, Germany, March 17, 1838. Mr. Stroebel came to America as a young man, in 1852, and located in Jefferson county, where he purchased a small tract of land and engaged in farming. In 1864 he became a minister of the Evangelical Association, and after he retired went to Blooming Grove township, Dane county, near Madison, from whence he went to Fort Atkinson and there died, November 19, 1906. His widow still resides there. Mr. and Mrs. Stroebel had ten children, Mrs. Mews being the second in order of birth. To Mr. and Mrs. Mews there have been born three children: Samuel Benjamin, who married Miss Tillie Gall, is farming in Dale township; Anna Barbara is the wife of Frank Zahrt, an agriculturist of Ellington township, and Edward William is single and resides at home.

RUDOLPH J. TELLOCK, the owner of a farm of 140 acres in Greenville township, has also been identified with the grass matting business in this section for a number of years. He was born in Dantzig, Pomerania, Germany, March 20, 1861, a son of John and Doris Tellock, who came to the United States in 1867, locating in Wolf River township, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, where Mr. Tellock was engaged in farming until his death in 1891, his wife having passed away in April, 1888. They had a family of eight children, Rudolph J. being the fifth born. He attended school in Wolf River township, and when only sixteen years of age went to work on the river, where he worked for twenty years, rising to the position of crew manager. He then began working for the Oshkosh Grass Matting Company, with which firm he continued seven years, and in 1888 he moved to Winchester township, where he had a farm of 100 acres, which was being operated by his sons. He continued to reside there until 1909, when he sold out and came to Greenville township, where he operates a dairy farm of 140 acres. He is still engaged in the matting business to some extent, being employed by the Waite Grass Carpet Company of Oshkosh, having charge of the cutting and baling of the grass, which is shipped from Minnesota to the factory. Mr. Tellock is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in politics an independent Republican. On October 8, 1882, he was married to Ottilia Becker, who was born in Wolf River township, July 4, 1866, daughter of Carl and Ernestina (Schmidt) Becker, natives of Pomerania, Germany, where the father was born December 26, 1822, and the mother March 12, 1832. They were married in Germany, and were among the first settlers of Winnebago county, settling there at a time when the nearest point for supplies was Oshkosh, then a small village, whence they went in a little canoe. Mr. Becker was one of the first land owners in Winnebago county, and built the first house in Wolf River township. Carl Becker died in that township in March, 1889, his wife having passed away the month previous. Thirteen children were born to them, of whom two survive: Mrs. Tellock, and Emil William, a resident of Oshkosh, in the employ of the Paine Company; Mr. and Mrs. Tellock have had nine children, namely: Frank Elmer, born February 16, 1884; William Amil John, born March 23, 1886, a cheesemaker of Menasha, Wisconsin, married Alma Pyratz; Lydia, born May 8, 1888, died April 18, 1889; Emil Henry, born February 20, 1890; Alfred Carl, born April 23, 1892; Edward Henry, born July 6, 1894; Erwin Ferdinand, born December 17, 1896; Albert Otto, born April 26, 1899, and Gladys Joy, born August 31, 1902.

HENRY ANTON BESSING, who devotes his attention to dairy farming on a tract of sixty acres in Grand Chute township, has been a resident of this section for a long period, and is known as one of his township's reliable citizens. He was born at Buffalo, New York, January 17, 1854, a son of Bernhard and Katharine (Sunderman) Bessing, natives of Prussia, Germany. The parents of Mr. Bessing came to the United States about 1842, and located first in Detroit, Michigan, but after a short period removed to Buffalo, New York, where Mr. Bessing followed his trade as moulder until his death there in 1864. Two years later Mrs. Bessing married Bernhardt Doing and came to Appleton, Mr. Doing purchasing a farm near the present property of Mr. Bessing, and here he died some years later, Mrs. Doing then returning to Buffalo, where her death occurred January 19, 1892. Five children were born by her first marriage: Henry Anton, Frank, who is deceased; John, a resident of Buffalo, and Bernhardt, also living in the Bison city, and Rose, who died in September, 1908, the wife of John Guelff, of Grand Chute township. Mrs. Doing had four children by her second union, namely: William, a soldier in, the regular United States army; Tilly, who is deceased; Joseph, who resides on State street, Appleton, an engineer in the paper mill, and Minnie, who is deceased.

Henry Anton Bessing received his education in the public schools of Buffalo, New York, and worked on the home farm in Grand Chute township until he was twenty-one years old. He then started working out as a hired man among the farmers of that vicinity, and when he had accumulated enough money he invested it in the farm which he now operates, a first-class tract of sixty acres which he devotes to dairy farming. He has erected a number of new, substantial buildings, fitted with modern equipment, with improvements to insure cleanliness and hygienic conditions, and he has a fine herd of dairy stock which he feeds on well kept pasture land. Mr. Bessing is a member of the Roman Catholic Church at Appleton. In political matters he is an adherent of the principles of the Democratic party, and he has served one term as a member of the town board.

On November 11, 1884, Mr. Bessing was married to Mary Heiman, who was born in Oconto, Wisconsin, June 22, 1865, daughter of Henry and Anna (Jochamen) Heiman, the former born in Holland in 1832, and the latter in Westphalia, Germany, October 8, 1842. Mr. Heiman came to America when about twenty years of age, and for about eight years thereafter he followed his trade of baker. After his marriage he became proprietor of a boarding house in Oconto, Wisconsin, but after three years bought a farm in Grand Chute township, which he operated until 1905, at which time he retired and moved to Appleton, where his death occurred one year later. His wife had passed away in 1905. They were the parents of ten children: Henry, who is deceased; Mrs. Bessing; Lena, the wife of William Liethen, overseer of the paper mill, residing on Walnut street, Appleton; Anna, the wife of Frank Hooyman, a farmer of Freedom township; John, residing on the old homestead; Frank; and Francis, deceased; Antone, a Grand Chute township farmer; Margaret, the wife of Matt Jackels, a retired farmer of Story street, Appleton, and one child, which died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Bessing have had six children: Cecelia, born November 22, 1884, died February 5, 1906; John, born May 16, 1887, who died December 8, 1894; William, born February 17, 1890; Anna, born May 23, 1892; Raymond, born August 31, 1894, and Agnes, born February 16, 1896.

CLYDE MAIN, whose forty-acre farm in Grand Chute township is producing excellent crops, is one of Outagamie county's scientific agriculturists. Mr. Main was born at Shiocton, Wisconsin, August 25, 1878, and is a son of Perkins and Mary (Crowley) Main, the former born in New York state in 1857, and the latter near Ripon, Wisconsin, August 21, of that year. Perkins Main was reared on a farm in New York, and as a young man was engaged in horse dealing. He came to Wisconsin when he was about twenty years of age, and first engaged in running a stage line between Appleton and Shawano, but after some years went to Chicago, where he engaged in a teaming business, his death occurring about eight years later, in 1899. His widow now resides with her son Albert, a farmer of Grand Chute township. Clyde Main attended the schools of Appleton and Chicago and after his father's death came to Stevensville, Outagamie county, with his mother and brother, and rented a farm for two years, when they went to Shiocton and spent a like period on a rented farm. Returning to Stevensville, they remained for one year, and in August, 1908, Mr. Main came to Grand Chute township and purchased the farm of forty acres which he is now cultivating. He gives his entire time and attention to his farming and stock-raising interests, and specializes to some extent in cabbages and potatoes. In political affairs he is an adherent of the principles of the Republican party, although he has never found time to engage actively in public matters and has never aspired to public preferment.

Mr. Main was married August 14, 1901, to Florence Brooker, who was born January 26, 1879, in Waupaca county, Wisconsin, daughter of Frank and Sarah (Aman) Brooker, the former born in London, England, about 1854, and the latter in Waupaca county, January 2, 1859. Mr. Brooker came to the United States with his parents as a child, and located first in Waupaca county, later removing to Outagamie county, where he became a land owner and resided until the spring of 1911. He then went to a county in northern Wisconsin, where he purchased a farm of eighty acres. Mr. and Mrs. Brooker were the parents of seven children, namely: Florence, who married Mr. Main; George, who is single and lives with his parents; Finette, the wife of Leon Kennedy, residing in Bovina township; Lloyd and Effie, living at home; Lillian, the wife of William Dey of Minocqua, and Frank, residing at home. Mr. Brooker had four children by a previous marriage, of whom three are now living: Burton and Ralph, of Minnesota, and Laura, the wife of George Kaufmann, of Shiocton. Alvin is deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Main have had four children: Theodore A., born March 7, 1903; Clarinda, born December 4, 1904; Clyde, born February 5, 1907, and Jessie M., born February 17, 1911.

CHAILES H. KESTING, a representative citizen and good, practical farmer of Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, who, is engaged in general farming and dairying, was born in Troy, New York, April 15, 1854, and is a son of Charles and Katharine (Neff) Kesting, the former of whom was born in Wittenberg, Germany, March 14, 1826, and the latter at the same place, July 27, 1827. Charles Kesting followed the trade of shoemaker in Germany until coming to the United States in 1851, and after locating at Troy, New, York, continued that business for about three years. At the end of this time he came to Appleton, Wisconsin, where he followed his trade for about five years, and then bought a farm in Center township, which was partly cleared. After three years he sold his land and moved into the city of Appleton for one year, but eventually went back to farming, purchasing the farm which is now being operated by Charles H. Kesting, and there he continued to live until his death in 1897. His widow, who survives him, makes her home with her son. They had a family of seven children, as follows: Charles H., two who died in infancy, Rosa, who married Henry Ebner, a resident of Michigan; Mary, who married Dell Collar, residing in Hortonville; Lottie, the wife of Charles Palmer of Elcho, Wisconsin, and Clara, who is deceased.

Charles H. Kesting attended the schools of Appleton, and worked on the home farm for his father until his marriage, at which time he bought the old homestead, on which he has operated ever since. He has eighty acres in a high state of cultivation, and is carrying on general farming and dairying. Mr. Kesting was married August 17, 1885, to Ida Beckenstrader, who was born in Appleton, October 31, 1862, daughter of Joseph and Frederica (Zinn) Beckenstrader, natives of Germany, where they were born in 1826 and 1839, respectively. On locating in Appleton, Mr. Beckenstrader followed the trade of cabinetmaker for several years, and then bought a farm in Osborn township, which he continued to operate until his death in 1902, after which his widow moved to Appleton, where she still resides. They were the parents of seven children: Mrs. Kesting, Olga, Arthur, Laura and Bertha, who are all deceased, except the first named; Herman, who is residing in the State of Maryland, and Hattie, who married Daniel Van Oyen, of Appleton. Mr. and Mrs. Kesting have had five children: Adella, born August 9, 1886; Fred, born December 9, 1888; Herman, born April 21, 1893; Leo, born January 26, 1896, and Lillie, born May 15, 1902. Mr. Kesting is not connected with any religious organization. In political matters he is a Republican.

CHARLES CLACK, a prominent citizen of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is engaged in the produce business, is one of Outagamie county's large land owners, and has also been identified with the public interests of his section for many years. Mr. Clack was born in Oxfordshire, England, February 18, 1857, and is a son of Charles and Adelaide (Wilkins) Clack, the latter of whom died in England. The father came to America in 1867, bringing his son Charles with him, and located at Barnett, Dodge county, Wisconsin. Being a shoemaker by trade he followed that occupation for about three years, and then bought a farm near Barnett Junction, which he continued to operate until his death, which occurred in 1899. He and his wife were the parents of seven children, all of whom are living: Mary Ann, the widow of Herbert Kellam, residing near the home of her brother Charles; Elizabeth, who married a Mr. Frank, residing in London, England; Charles; Hannah, who married James H. Peachey, a resident of Barnett; Adelaide, the wife of A. A. Martin, residing just adjoining Mr. Clack; Edward, who lives in Pittsville, Wood county, and Alice, who is single and resides at Barnett. Charles Clack attended the schools of his native place and the district school at Barnett, and was thirteen years of age when he began working out among the farmers of Dodge county for ten dollars per month in the harvest field and at other kinds of farm labor. After about three years his father bought his farm near Barnett Junction, and Mr. Clack went to work with him until he had attained his majority. During the following October he was married and rented a farm in Freedom township, on which he continued to reside for twenty-five years, although he had bought land adjoining this which he also operated. He eventually became the owner of 344 acres of land and continued to live on that place until 1902, in which year he moved to Appleton. He continued to operate this property until 1903 by means of hired help, and then sold some of his land, although he still owns 1421/2 acres in Grand Chute township, which are being operated by his sons. He owns other land in different parts of the State, as well as valuable city property, including four residences in Appleton, one in Oshkosh, and one in Kaukauna. On his Grand Chute township farm he specializes in cabbage growing, and he is extensively engaged in the produce business in Appleton. Mr. Clark is now serving as treasurer of the Central Mutual Hail and Cyclone Association of Appleton. In political matters he is independent, and he has served as chairman of Freedom township for seven terms, as treasurer and clerk of the school board for more than twenty years, and was elected a member of the General Assembly from the Second District for one term. His religious connection is with the Congregational Church.

On November 18, 1878, Mr. Clark was married to Anna Bridge, who was born July 4, 1854, at Galena, Illinois, daughter of Robert and Harriet (Heap) Bridge, natives of Lancashire, England. Robert Bridge came to America during the early forties, but later returned to England for his wife, and on their return they settled near Stone Bank, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, on a farm, but some years later removed to Galena, Illinois. Mr. Bridge was there engaged in the manufacture of brick for about three years and then removed to a farm, on which he carried on operations for twenty years, eventually removing to Calumet county, and three years later to Freedom township, Outagamie county. After six years there, he retired and settled in Appleton, where his wife died, and he subsequently went to live with Mr. and Mrs. Clack, at whose home he died about 1904. Mrs. Clack was the only child of her parents. She and Mr. Clack have had four children: Edith Adelaide, born October 16, 1880; John, born October 5, 1882; Ella E., born October 17, 1884; and Robert, born June 5, 1890, all single and residing at home. Mr. Clack is a prominent member of the Odd Fellows.

ROBERT RUSTON, one of the old and honored residents of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who owns and operates a fine tract of land in section 6, Seymour township, came to this section at a very early day, and deserves more than passing mention for the part he took in the development of this part of the state. Mr. Ruston is a native of England, born at Laynam, Nottinghamshire, June 26, 1833, a son of Robert Wilson and Mary Maria (Knight) Ruston, and a grandson of Robert and Mary (Crawford) Ruston, of Lincoln, Lincolnshire. Both Mr. Ruston's father and grandfather were sailors by occupation, the latter being lost at sea and the former dying October 14, 1862, at the age of fifty-seven years. Mr. Ruston had these brothers and sisters: Wilson, William, John, Mary Ann, Eliza and Sarah.

Robert Ruston came to the United States in 1865 and first located at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, where he remained until the railroad was built through to Seymour in 1872, when he drove through to the latter place, bringing with him his baggage and a cow, while his wife and family made the trip by train. He had purchased eighty acres of wild land in Seymour township, and here he built a log shanty, with boards laid on the sleepers for the stove, and other furniture consisting of a table, rude chairs and a bed. He first started to work in the woods, and during the next spring worked on the Seymour main road, which was then building, and his first crop was put in his land with an axe. Mr. Ruston can tell many interesting experiences of the early days of Seymour township, when hardships were many and conveniences none. He relates of a period when the gnats and mosquitoes became so troublesome that returning from his work one day he was almost unable to recognize his family on account of the severe bites of the little insects. Year after year Mr. Ruston worked untiringly, clearing the brush and timber from his land, digging out stumps and filling in mires, grading and planting, erecting new buildings and building fences, and in time he had made his property one of the valuable farms of Seymour township. On November 7, 1853, at Rotterham, Yorkshire, England, Mr. Ruston was married to Ann Kitson, who shared with him all the hardships and privations of pioneer days. She was born on April 18, 1833, at Man, Yorkshire, England, a daughter of Robert and Frances (Autey) Kitson, whose other children were: George, Alfred, William, Robert, James, Bessie, Mary, Annis, Abigail and Rachel. Mr. and Mrs. Ruston have had the following children: Robert, born February 13, 1858, died March 13, 1858; Mary Ann, born August 4, 1859, married Louis Conklin May 24, 1885; Eliza, born April 20, 1861, married Edward C. Weymouth November 16, 1887, and died June 15, 1895, leaving three children named Robert Edward, Lillian Odetta and Frances; Maria, born March 15, 1863, married William E. Lane July 26, 1888; William, born February 25, 1865; Louisa, born September 16, 1867, died September 28, 1868; Frances, born December 25, 1870, died November 7, 1906; Bessie, born March 31, 1873, married Samuel D. Westlake August 5, 1905, and Isabella, born August 29, 1875. Prior to coming to this country, Mr. Ruston worked for twenty-one years in the iron works, first as underhand and later as a puddler. He helped to make the iron that entered into the construction of the "Great Eastern," and at the Parkgate Iron Works, Yorkshire, helped roll the first armor plate manufactured. Upon coming to this country Mr. Ruston studied the political conditions of the country with the result that he cast his first presidential ballot for General U. S. Grant in 1868, and has ever since been a stanch advocate of Republican doctrines and the candidates of the Republican party.

ANDREW GEHRKE, who has been a resident of Seymour township for more than a quarter of a century, is one of the self-made men of Outagamie county, having come to this section in humble circumstances, and through sheer perseverance and industry has worked his way to the front ranks of agriculturists of his section. Mr. Gehrke is a native of Germany, born August 11, 1847, a son of Christ and Christina (Mannke) Gehrke, the former of whom died in 1872, aged fifty-four years, and the latter in 1855, when thirty-seven years of age. They had three children: Margaret, Louisa and Andrew. Christ Gehrke was married a second time to Gottliebe Templin, by whom he had six children, namely: Afrizma, Carolina, Helena, Jacob, John and Fred.

Andrew Gehrke received his education in the schools of his native country, after leaving which he learned the trade of tailor from his father, and followed that profession in Germany until 1871, in which year he was married to Caroline Schrul. They then came to the United States, and for some time Mr. Gehrke followed his trade in Milwaukee, later going to Menominee, Michigan, where he obtained employment in the sawmills. Here his wife died, leaving him with children named: Charles, Bertha, Tina and August, of whom the latter three are now deceased, and Mr. Gehrke was married a second time to Tina Abraham. In 1886, Mr. Gehrke decided to try his fortune at farming, he having been unfortunate in other undertakings, and he accordingly purchased eighty acres of wild land in Seymour township. At this time he was very much discouraged, his business ventures having put him $800 in debt, but he settled down to clear the land, and soon had it under cultivation and on a paying basis. Thus encouraged, he purchased another tract of eighty acres, which he also cleared, and here built a frame house, a barn 36x100 feet and a stable 30x60 feet. Later, Mr. Gehrke turned the management of this place over to his son Charles, and moved to a nearby tract, just beyond Seymour, on section 33, twenty acres being in Seymour township and one acre within the city limits. There were no buildings on this property, but Mr. Gehrke soon erected a seven-room house, and a barn 30x70 feet, with basement under all, and here he carries on general gardening. The barn was burned in 1910, but this he has since replaced. Mr. Gehrke is a member of the Lutheran Church. He takes a keen interest in public questions of the day, but he has never aspired to office.

GUSTAVE HENRY FEURIG, deceased, was born June 5, 1843, in Jamaica, South America, a son of Rev. Gustave Rudolph Seigmund and Agnes Justina (Gruhl) Feurig, natives of Bethelsdorf, Saxony, Germany, whose other children were: Bertha, who died in a South American mission; Oscar; Ernestina; and Emma, who married William Michelstetter, president of the Seymour State Bank.

Gustave Henry Feurig secured his early education in Nieskey, Germany, where he learned the trade of coppersmith at the factory of his uncle, later becoming foreman. In this connection he traveled extensively in Germany and Russia, and in 1871 he came to the United States, stopping first at either Egg Harbor or Hope, Indiana, from whence he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio. He then went to Watertown, Wisconsin, where his parents lived at that time, but shortly afterward went to Milwaukee and added to his experience by learning the tinner's trade, and in 1876 came to Seymour, where he engaged in the hardware business with William Michelstetter. There was also a branch store at Blackcreek, Wisconsin, which was conducted by another partner, Carl Trinkler, whose interests were purchased in 1882, and in 1887 Mr. Feurig became sole proprietor of the business which he conducted until his death, March 12, 1907. Mr. Feurig was a stanch member of the Moravian Church, and the family is still connected with that denomination, attending services at Green Bay.

Mr. Feurig was married October 1, 1876, to Carolina Henrietta Ottilie Scheller, who was born at Green Bay, Wisconsin, September 8, 1857, daughter of Albert and Louisa (Moeller) Scheller, natives of Thurenger, Germany, the former of whom came to, the United States in 1846 on a steamship, and the latter two years later in a sailing vessel which took twelve weeks to accomplish the trip. They were married in Green Bay, August 28, 1851, and there Mr. Scheller established himself in the clothing business, which he continued to carry on until his death, November 9, 1861, aged thirty-four years. His widow, who is still living and will be eighty-three years old, June, 1912, was a daughter of Henry Jones and Margaret Christina (Krause) Moeller, natives of Germany, who settled in Green Bay, Wisconsin, at an early day. Mr. Moeller was a cabinetmaker in his native country, but after coming to the United States he engaged in farming. He died in 1862.

Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Feurig, namely: Agnes Leola, born June 16, 1878, who married Don Carlos Clarke, proprietor of the Hotel Williams, Macomb, Illinois; Gertrude Alma, born October 16, 1881, who married Halder Melvin Hansen, who does office work for the Boston Montana Smelter Works at Great Falls, Montana, and they have one child, Melvin Feurig, born March 8, 1909; Edna Amanda, born March 2, 1885, who lives at home, and Claude M., born March 12, 1887.

FAYETTE L. FORWARD, senior member of the wholesale cheese, dairy products and cold storage firm of F. L. Forward Company, at Seymour, Wisconsin, is a native of the Empire State, having been born March 20, 1852, in Lewis county, New York, a son of Franklin and Eunice (Hall) Forward, and a grandson of Flavel Forward, a native of Virginia, who died in 1860, at the age of eighty-two years. Flavel Forward was twice married, having by his first wife, Clarissa, a native of New York, the following children: Orville, Lucinda, Franklin, Louisa, Aaron and Jane. Franklin Forward was born March 11, 1817, in New York State, and in early life became a school teacher, a profession which he followed for many years, eventually becoming superintendent of county schools. He engaged in farming during his latter years, and this was his occupation at the time of his death, July 23, 1877. Mr. Forward married Eunice Hall, who was a native of Connecticut, and they had but one child, Fayette L.

Fayette L. Forward received his early education in the common schools of Lewis county, New York, and at the age of fourteen years entered the high school at Oswego, after leaving which he took a course in the State normal school, graduating therefrom in 1870. He then engaged in commercial work until his father's death, at which time he engaged in farming and continued to carry on agricultural pursuits until the death of his first wife, Frances Babcock, a native of Oswego county, New York, and the daughter of Perry G. Babcock, a New York farmer. She passed away in 1884, at the age of thirty-two years, and at this time Mr. Forward became a commercial traveler, continuing as such until coming to Seymour, March 28, 1888. During that year he was married (second) to Amanda Ryal, who was born March 8, 1853, in Lewis county, New York, a daughter of Leonard and Jane Alexander, farming people of New York. Mr. Forward first embarked in the mercantile business at Seymour, Wisconsin, under the firm name of Muehl & Forward, but after two years sold out his interest and began to establish his present business, which has become one of the largest business industries in the city. A branch house was established at Pulaski in 1906 to assist in taking care of the business which now embraces a portion of Outagamie, Shawano, Brown and Oconto counties, the year of 1910 being one of the most successful in the long term of years, when 2,000,000 pounds of cheese were handled, valued at $300,000.

The firm of F. L. Forward Company have also been engaged in the coal business in Seymour for eighteen years.

Mr. Forward is a Republican in national political views, but takes a non-partisan stand in city affairs. He has been assessor for three years, served as a member of the Republican County Committee for two years, and for six consecutive years served in the office of mayor. He has always identified himself with those movements which he has believed would be of benefit to his adopted city, and he is looked upon as one of Seymour's public-spirited and progressive citizens.

BERNARD J. ZUEHLKE, register of deeds at Appleton, Wisconsin, for the past fifteen years, and a well known citizen and popular public official, was born in Hortonia, township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, January 1, 1867, a son of Julius and Augusta (Schmidt) Zuehlke, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1855 and settled in Hortonia township. Julius Zuehlke was a soldier in the Union army during the Civil war, was the operator of a grist mill for many years, and served as register of deeds from 1880 until 1887. He and his wife had a family of seven children, as follows: Bernard J.; Otto, residing in Appleton; Martha, who married Augustus Scherk, of Montana; August and Arthur, residing in Montana; Alma, who married Paul Noies, a resident of Appleton, and Alma, who died at the age of four years. Bernard J. Zuehlke received his education in the public schools, and his first employment was as a clerk under his father. Later he learned the telegraph business, and during the next eight years was employed by the St. Paul and Northwestern Railroads. In 1894 he became deputy register of deeds under D. A. Kenyon, serving in that position two years and then being elected to the office of register, which he has held to the present time, the longest continuous incumbency of that office since its establishment. His services have been of undoubted value to the city, for the advancement of which in all respects he has an earnest desire, and his earnest and conscientious work in discharging the duties of his office have won him not only the support but the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens. Mr. Zuehlke is a Republican in politics, and is fraternally connected with the Knights of Pythias, the Eagles and the Elks, in addition to being a popular member of the Harmony Club. He is interested in the Riverside Greenhouse. With his family he is a consistent attendant of the Lutheran Church.

On September 30, 1893, Mr. Zuehlke was united in marriage with Miss Margaret Heiss, of Appleton, daughter of Thomas and Margaret Heiss, and to this union there were born eight children, of whom five survive: Flora, Mildred, Grace, Margaret and Eileen, of whom Miss Flora is attending high slchool, while the others are students in the graded schools of Appleton.

WILLIAM WOLF, who is discharging the duties connected with the office of county clerk of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, is one of the popular public officials of this county, and a highly esteemed citizen of Appleton. Mr. Wolf is a native of Outagamie county, having been born in Black Creek township, May 5, 1875, and is a son of Peter and Emeline (Barton) Wolf. George Wolf, the grandfather of William, founded the family in the United States in the early '40s, when he came from Germany and settled in Washington county, Wisconsin. There Peter Wolf was born in 1852, and at the age of eighteen years came to Outagamie county and bought wild land with his brother Valentine, the two brothers continuing to improve and farm this property up to the time of their deaths. Peter Wolf died in 1895, his widow surviving him ten years, and they had a family of eight children, of whom two are now deceased. William Wolf secured his education in the public schools, and his boyhood and youth were spent on the home farm with his father, he continuing with him until his death. He has always been closely identified with public matters in Outagamie county, and was elected to the office of treasurer of Black Creek township, a position he held for seven years. He served as chairman of the township board for six years, during which time he was a member of the building committee that erected the Outagamie County Asylum for the Insane, was school clerk for fifteen years and assessor two years, and in 1910 was elected to the office of county clerk for a term of two years. The high esteem in which Mr. Wolf is held by his fellow citizens has been proven by his popularity at the polls, due to the efficient manner in which he has filled every requirement in any of the positions which he has been called upon to accept, and to the fact that his county's interests and those of his township are always placed in advance of his own. Mr. Wolf's fraternal connections are with the Woodmen, the E. F. U., the Eagles and the Order of the Moose and Elks.

FOX RIVER PAPER COMPANY, one of the old established industries of Appleton, Wisconsin, has grown steadily since 1882, when it, was founded by W. G. and J. H. Wharton, S. K. Wambold and Captain G. W. Spalding, and is rated one of the leading paper manufacturing companies of Northern Wisconsin. The first mill built by the company, known as the "Ravine" mill, employed about eighty men and had an output of about four tons of paper daily, but this was soon found to be inadequate for the demand, and in 1887 the mill was enlarged and the "Lincoln" mill was built, the capacity thus being increased to twelve tons per day. In 1893 the Fox River mill was erected, with a large rag room, and the capacity is now about twenty-five tons per day, 375 people being employed. Writing paper is produced exclusively, and the company's product is marketed all over the world, the output being about $1,000,000 annually. The plant has a floor space of five and seven-eighths acres, and modern equipment and machinery are installed throughout, power therefore being obtained from the Fox River, the company owning about three-sevenths of the flow of the Fox River at this level. This is sufficient to operate the machinery under normal conditions, but in case of emergency the company has steam power to the extent of 2,000 horsepower. W. D. Wharton is president of the company, and Hiram G. Freeman is treasurer and manager. Mr. Freeman has been indirectly and directly connected with the firm since it was first established, and in 1884 he was elected to the position of secretary, acting in that capacity until January 1, 1899, when he was made manager and treasurer. He is a native of Concord, New Hampshire, born January 3, 1844, a son of Rev. Hiram and Adaline (Guernsey) Freeman, natives of Vermont. He received his education in the various towns to which his father's calling brought him, and attended Ripon College until he was fifteen years old, at which time he began clerking in a store at Ripon, and later was employed at Oshkosh and other places. He saw service during the Civil War as a member of Company B, Forty-first Wisconsin Volunteers, with which he was connected from May, 1864, until the following September, when the regiment was mustered out of the service, and Mr. Freeman returned to Appleton. He resumed clerking, and in 1867 went to Green Bay, where he had secured the position of bookkeeper for the First National Bank, and three years later accepted the position of cashier for the City National Bank of Green Bay, and from there went to Kellogg's National Bank, January 1, 1874. In 1881 he came to Appleton and accepted the position of cashier with the newly-organized Commercial National Bank, a position which he held until 1899. On November 20, 1886, Mr. Freeman was united in marriage with Miss Susie W. Smith, and one child, Angeline Smith, has been born to this union. Mr. Freeman is a Republican in his political beliefs, and is widely known and highly respected in Appleton.

PROFESSOR PAUL G. W. KELLER, one of the best known educators of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who has gained a wide reputation for his progressive ideas, was born at Helenville, Jefferson county, Wisconsin, in 1876, a son of John L. and Sophia (Smith) Keller, and a grandson of Bernhard Keller, who came to America from Germany in 1845 and spent his life in agricultural pursuits. John L. Keller, who was born in 1851, was a student of Watertown University, and for a number of years a merchant in Wisconsin, and now makes his home in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He and his wife had four sons: Paul G. W.; Oscar, a business man of St. Paul, Minnesota, where he is a member of the city council; Grover, who is studying medicine; and Hugo, in business in St. Paul. Paul G. W. Keller secured his early educational training in the German Parochial school, and in 1894 was graduated from the Lake Mills High school, and after teaching for two years, entered the Milwaukee Normal school, from which he was graduated in 1898. He was then assistant in the New London High school for one year, after which he entered the University of Chicago, graduating with the degree of S.B. in 1901. He then returned to New London as superintendent of schools for one year and in 1902 went to Manitowoc, Wisconsin, where he remained seven years as supervising principal, and during the fall of 1909 came to Appleton to accept the principalship of Appleton High school. He has continued to act in this capacity, and during his stay here has put the Domestic Science department on a full credit basis; has introduced a physical culture department in all its branches, including medical examination of all the students, and he is also introducing the innovation of recreation and social features. He is very popular with students and professors alike, and his standing in his profession is high. Professor Keller was elected to the exclusive Phi Beta Kappa Society while at the University of Chicago, a society organized December 5, 1776, at Williams & Marys College, membership therein being based on scholarship attainments.

In 1902, Professor Keller was united in marriage with Mary Hanson, at New London, she being a daughter of William Hanson, a business man of that place. Two children have been born to this union: Paul and Helene.

JOHN G. MORGAN, deceased, who for more than thirty years was one of the influential citizens and prominent business men of Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in Andover, Vermont, in 1820, and died in Appleton in 1898. Mr. Morgan's early life was spent in the East.

Upon coming West in 1866 he became a member of the firm of Ketchum & Morgan, in which he remained until the death of Mr. Ketchum. This business was later organized as the Appleton Machine Company. Mr. Morgan was affiliated with this company up to the time of his death. He was active in the ranks of the Republican party in whatever section he was located, but was never in any sense an office-seeker. He was prominent in fraternal circles, being a well known Odd Fellow, and in every walk of life distinguished himself by the display of admirable traits of character.

Mr. Morgan was married to Mary J. White, a native of Canada and a faithful member of the Methodist Church, and two children were born to this union: Alice, who is residing at Stevens Point, the widow of Alexander Slothower; and Carrie E., a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, who after teaching school for a time in Neenah, Wisconsin, became superintendent of the Appleton city schools, a position which she has filled very efficientlv during the past sixteen years. During the year 1905 Miss Morgan, who is well known in social circles of Appleton, took a trip through Europe for instruction and pleasure.

VICTOR F. MARSHALL, M. D., president of the Outagamie County Medical Society, who is engaged in a large practice in the city of Appleton, was born at De Pere, Wisconsin, August 4, 1873, a son of Simon and Rose (Strause) Marshall, natives of Germany. Simon Marshall came to the United States at the age of twenty-one years, and after a short period spent in the East came to Wisconsin, settling in DePere, where he became a merchant. In 1890 he came to Appleton and engaged in the grain, seed, flour and wool business, and he is still carrying on activities in that line. He was married in Wisconsin to Rose Strause, who died in December, 1907, and they had a family of six children, as follows: Bettie, who died at the age of twenty-one years; Samuel G., a partner in the Marshall Paper Company; Louis J., engaged in the same business; Victor F.; Harry, with the Marshall Paper Company; and Irene, who married M. F. Levy, a resident of Chicago. Victor F. Marshall attended the public schools of DePere, Wisconsin, graduating from the High School there in 1891, and immediately thereafter entered the University of Wisconsin, from which he graduated in 1895. He studied medicine in the University of Chicago, and after graduation in May, 1898, was for one year an interne. He opened an office in Appleton on January 15, 1899, and here by his courteous manner, sympathetic nature and acknowledged ability he has succeeded in building up an enviable practice. The doctor gives a great deal of attention to surgical work, and in this line has been especially successful, having spent six months abroad in post-graduate work during 1908. He is one of the house surgeons of Elizabeth's Hospital, and is connected with the National, State and County societies, being president of the latter organization. Fraternally, he is connected with the Masons, the Elks and the Knights of Pythias.

On March 6, 1899, Dr. Marshall was married to Fannie Levy, of Chicago, daughter of W. Levy, and they have had one son, Wallace Sydney, aged seven years.

MANLY JAY SANDBORN, M.. D., a leading member of the Outagamie county medical profession, whose chosen field of practice is the city of Appleton, has been prominently identified with various movements for the advancement of his profession in this section for a number of years. He was born July 25, 1869, in Freedom township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, a son of L. L. and Mary (Gurnee) Sandborn, natives of New York who came to Wisconsin in 1855 and settled in Outagamie county. Mr. Sandborn was a soldier during the Civil War and after his service to his country was completed he engaged in farming, although a carpenter by trade. He now resides in Appleton, his wife having died in 1895, in the faith of the Methodist Church, of which he is also a member. Two children were born to them: Dr. Manly Jay; and Lloyd Earl, who died in the fall of 1893. Manly Jay Sandborn received his preliminary education in the public and high schools, and in 1892 graduated from Lawrence University and in 1896 from Northwestern University. He immediately embarked in practice in Appleton, where he continued for three years, and then went to Colorado for a like period, but subsequently returned to Appleton, where he has built up a good practice and enjoys the esteem and confidence of the people to a large degree. He is a member of the National, State and County medical societies, and has been secretary of the latter for seven years and president for one term; is connected with the Masons, the E. F. U. and the Woodmen, and is commander of the local post of Sons of Veterans. He votes independently, and he and Mrs. Sandborn are faithful members and liberal supporters of the Methodist Church.

In 1896 Dr. Sandborn was united in marriage with Miss Flora Thompson, of Appleton, daughter of Wilber and Ellen Thompson, early settlers of this county, and to this union there have been born two children: Ruth and Lloyd.

HENRY W. ABRAHAM, M. D., president of the Fox River Valley Medical Society, and one of the leading members of the Outagamie county medical profession, is engaged in a general practice in Appleton with office at No. 572 Oneida street. Dr. Abraham is a native of Germany, born August 1, 1866, a son of William and Hannah Abraham, who came from the Fatherland in 1870 and settled in Wausau, Wisconsin. William Abraham, who has been a soldier in the German army, was a brickmaker by trade and had a plant in Wausau, where he died in 1891, his widow surviving until 1898. They had a family of six daughters and three sons, of whom one is deceased. Henry W. Abraham attended the public schools of Wausau, and in 1891 graduated from Lawrence College. After one year spent in Vienna he began to read medicine and then entered Rush Medical College, from which he was graduated in 1898. He immediately came to Appleton, where he engaged in a general practice, and here he has continued to the present time. He is a member of the Wisconsin State Board of Medical Examiners and holds membership in the County, State and National medical organizations, is president of the Fox River Valley Medical Society, is connected with the Theta Phi college fraternity, and is also a member of the Masons. Dr. Abraham is possessed of a kind, sympathetic nature, and the natural taste for the various branches of the medical profession that makes the ideal physician. He has built up a large and lucrative practice among the leading residents of Appleton, and has a host of friends both in and out of his profession. Dr. Abraham in politics is an independent voter, recognizing no party lines. He and Mrs. Abrahams are members of the Congregational Church.

In 1899 Dr. Abraham was united in marriage with Nellie Bassett, of Berlin, Wisconsin, a graduate of Lawrence College, and to this union there has been born one daughter, Margaret, aged eight years.

FRANK PUTH, one of the best known live stock raisers in Grand Chute township, who is also engaged in farming, is the owner of a fine tract of 100 acres, and for a long period has been prominently identified with the agricultural interests of Outagamie county. He was born in the Third Ward, New London, Waupaca county, Wisconsin, April 2, 1859, a son of Nicholas and Eva (Mettlach) Puth, the former born about 1825 in Cobelantz, Prussia, Germany, and the latter July 7, 1835, in Treier, Prussia. Nicholas Puth was in young manhood engaged as a boatman on the Rhine until he came to America at the age of nineteen years. For the six years following he was a sailor on the Great Lakes, and later spent several seasons in rafting on the Wisconsin River, after which he located in New London. He worked for about three years at the boom at Hales Mill, on Wolf River, at the end of which time he exchanged his property for eighty acres of farming land in Dale township, which he continued to operate until 1909, and since that time he has been living at the home of his eldest daughter, in Ashland. In February, 1865, he enlisted in a company of Wisconsin Volunteers, under Captain Youngs, and served until the close of the war. Mrs. Puth died January 9, 1909. They were the parents of seven children, as follows: Frank; John P., a farmer of Adrian, North Dakota; Katharine, widow of Joseph St. Lawrent, of Ashland; Johanah, wife of Michael Anderson, a farmer of Adrian, North Dakota; Lucy, wife of Jasper Jourdan, of Adrian, North Dakota; Nicholas, who resides in the West; and Mary, wife of Warner Truesdell, a grain and lumber dealer of Wright, Minnesota.

Frank Puth attended school in Dale township, and made his home with his parents until he was twenty-five years of age, although during this time he spent some years in the woods and with threshing machine outfits. He then went West, where he operated a well-drilling machine in Michigan, Minnesota and the Dakotas, and after his return to this county worked for one year for D. Hameil & Company. He was married at this time, and rented a farm near Hortonville for three years, which he later left to buy a farm in Hortonia. On selling this farm three years later, he rented a property in Greenville township, but after five years disposed of this farm and bought eighty acres of his present farm in Grand Chute township, to which he has since added twenty acres. He devotes a great deal of his time to dairy farming, but his principal interest lies in stock raising, he making a specialty of breeding registered Holstein cattle and Duroc-Jersey hogs. He is a member of the Holstein Friesian Association of America, the National Duroc Breeders' Association, the Winnebago Holstein Breeders' Association and the Wisconsin Live Stock Breeders' Association, and is a director in the Appleton Fair and Driving Park Association. He is a member of St. Mary's Catholic Church, and belongs to Branch No. 128 of the Catholic Knights. In political matters he is a Democrat with independent tendencies.

On May 26, 1887, Mr. Puth was married to Caroline Trettien, who was born in Ellington township, Outagamie county, January 24, 1865, daughter of Frederick and Caroline (Slueter) Trettien natives of Prussia. Mrs. Puth's father was born October 19, 1821 and her mother March 15, 1831, and came to Wisconsin in 1858, having spent five years in New York State, Mr. Trettien having burned coal on a five-acre tract twenty miles from Buffalo. On locating in Wisconsin, Mr. Trettien bought eighty acres of farming land in Ellington township, where he resided until 1889, and then retired from active life and moved to Appleton, where he died one year later. His widow passed away in 1903. Mr. Trettien served during the Civil War from September, 1864, until January, 1865, under Captain Marston, of Appleton, and received his honorable discharge on account of disability. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Trettien, namely: Charles T., a marketmaster of St. Paul; Albertina, wife of Fred Arnold, of Freedom township; Anna, wife of Henry Rath, a photographer of Appleton; Frank, residing on the homestead in Ellington township; Mrs. Puth; August, a professor in Vermilion College, South Dakota; Amelia, wife of Edward McCanless, a merchant of Antigo; and Mata, wife of George Bemis, tie and timber inspector for a railroad company at Antigo. Mr. and Mrs. Puth have had the following children: George, born April 7, 1888; Leonard, born May 26, 1890; Reuben, born December 4, 1892; Eva, born May 17, 1895; Ursula, born April 27, 1898; Irene, born December 26, 1900; Mabel, born February 6, 1903; Gertrude, born July 4, 1905; and Clement, born August 1, 1909. All of the children are living at home except Leonard, who is at present in New Mexico.

MICHAEL HECHEL, who owns and operates a general truck and dairy farm lying just forty-three rods west of the city limits of Appleton, Wisconsin, in Grand Chute township, is one of this section's good agriculturists. He was born October 31, 1866, in Bavaria, Germany, a son of Lawrence and Carrie (Felseis) Hechel, natives of that country. Lawrence Hechel was a soldier in the German army, and met his death in battle during the Franco-Prussian war, and his widow brought her family to America in 1884, coming direct to Appleton, where she lived until her death in February, 1904. Mr. Hechel has one brother, Fred, who also came to this country. Michael Hechel received his education in the schools of his native country, and was eighteen years of age when he came to this country with his mother and brother. His first employment was for B. C. Walter as a farm hand, at five dollars per month, and after one summer with him he worked out with other farmers in Grand Chute township for four years. He then built a home for himself and mother at No.535 Outagamie street, Appleton, and began working as a section hand in construction work, rising to the position of section boss. After six or seven years spent in Appleton, Mr. Hechel purchased twenty acres of his present farm, and continued to work as section boss for seven years longer, when he added seventeen acres to his original purchase and began farming. Since that time he has added to this property and erected a modern house and barn, and he now has forty acres in a fine state of cultivation and follows truck and dairy farming with much success. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and takes an independent stand in politics .

On March 20, 1892, Mr. Hechel was married to Louisa Suckow, who was born in Pommerin, Germany, April 7, 1867, daughter of William and Mary (Geisthardt) Suckow, who came to America in 1872 and located in Bern township, Marathon county, in 1881, after having resided at various other places. They still live in Marathon county, where they are well known and highly esteemed. Mr. and Mrs. Hechel have had five children: Frederick, born September 14, 1895; William, born July 25, 1896; Oscar, born July 3, 1897; Emma, born October 11, 1898, and Arthur, born October 27, 1904 .

PHILLIP SCHAETZEL, whose thirty-eight-acre farm lies just one mile west of the city limits of Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in South Germantown,, Washington county, Wisconsin, March 16, 1857, a son of Valentine and Elizabeth (G----------- ) Schaetzel, natives of Germany, who came to the United States in 1840, locating in Washington county, where they bought land and spent the remainder of their lives. They had a family of nine children, of whom Phillip was the fifth in order of birth, and his education was secured in the district schools of Washington county. After leaving school Mr. Schaetzel commenced to work on the home farm, remaining there until he was twenty-seven years old, at which time his parents died, and he went to work in the lime kiln in Washington county for about six months. After leaving that employment he came to Outagamie county and settled on the farm in Grand Chute township, which he is now operating, and here he has continued ever since. He has a nicely equipped farm of thirty-eight acres, all in a high state of cultivation, and he gives it his entire attention. He is an adherent of the principles of the Democratic party, but he has never found time to actively engage in public matters, although he takes a keen interest in local topics, and may be counted upon to assist in those movements which have for their object the betterment of the community in any way. Mr. Schaetzel and his wife are consistent members of St. John's Lutheran Church.

On June 28, 1884, Mr. Schaetzel was married (first) to Abalon Bladel, who was born in Germany, and she died leaving seven children, as follows: Josie, John, Herbert, Elizabeth, William, Katherine and Lilly, all residing at home except Katherine, who is deceased. On July 11, 1906, Mr. Schaetzel married (second) Anna Kubitz, who was born June 30, 1878, in Germany. There have been no children to this union .

THOMAS LANDERS, one of the representative farmers of Outagamie county, who is carrying on extensive operations in Grand Chute township, where he serves as treasurer of the school board, was born on the farm on which he now resides, April 3, 1871, and is a son of Thomas and Bridget (Hawley) Landers. Mr. Landers' parents are natives of Ireland, his father having been born in County Waterford and his mother in County Tipperary, and they were married in Outagamie county, whence Thomas Landers, Sr., had come about the year 1860, after spending some time in railroad construction work in New York. He bought a tract of land from an old French Indian settler, and while he was clearing his own property worked for others, and in this way at the time of his death, in 1893, had one of the finely improved properties of the township. His widow continued to live on the homestead until her death occurred in 1900. They were the parents of three children: John and Katherine, who are deceased, and Thomas. Mrs. Landers had been previously married to Michael Hall, by whom she had two children: Edward, a resident of Green Bay; and Michael, who is deceased. Thomas Landers attended the district schools of Grand Chute township and the Third Ward school in Appleton, and remained on the home farm until he had attained his majority, at which time he went to Escanaba, Michigan, and for one year worked on the ore docks. He then returned to the homestead, where he has continued to reside to this time, having a farm of eighty acres, all in a high state of cultivation, to which he devotes his entire attention. He is an independent Democrat in political matters, and a consistent member of the Roman Catholic Church.

Mr. Landers was married September 20, 1899, to Alice Thompson, who was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 7, 1871, daughter of John Breeze and Mary Ann (Daily) Thompson, the mother born in County Waterford, Ireland, in 1839, and the father in 1845 in Wales. He came to America when a mere child with his parents. He became a mason contractor, a business which he followed until his death, September 21, 1900, his wife having passed away a few days before. They were the parents of six children: Charles, who is deceased; Mrs. Landers; Alfred, a resident of Racine; Charles (2), of Ironwood, Michigan; Minnie, the wife of I. G. Harriman, of Milwaukee; and Samuel, who lives in Milwaukee. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Landers, namely: Alice Minnie, born October 5, 1900; Annette Daily, born January 7, 1902; Thomas Daniel, born April 4, 1903; John James, born November 13, 1904; and Eileen Helen, born April 26, 1906 .

CHARLES WILLIAM MUELLER, deceased. When a man has resided in a community for a number of years and has proven himself always industrious, energetic, responsible and public-spirited, his death is keenly felt among his fellow townsmen, and his place is not readily filled. Such a man was the late Charles William Mueller, who was born in Berlin, Germany, March 2, 1856, and died in Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, March 9, 1905. Mr. Mueller was a son of Frederick and Bertha Mueller, the former born October 19, 1828, and the latter November 6, 1839, both in Germany, neither of whom ever left the Fatherland. Charles W. Mueller came to the United States when fourteen years of age with an aunt, and they located in Outagamie county, where Mr. Mueller attended school for about one year, having been previously tutored in his native country. He worked on the farms of Ellington township until his marriage, after which for one year he operated on his father-in-law's farm for one year. He then secured employment in the grist mill in Appleton for three years, and spent a number of years in the lumber yard, but eventually purchased a farm in Grand Chute township, where he was actively engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. He was a member of the Evangelical Church and a Republican in politics .

On November 27, 1880, Mr. Mueller was united in marriage with Helen Lipke, who was born in Ellington township, Outagamie county, February 15, 1861, daughter of Henry and Henrietta (Angelroth) Lipke, natives of Germany, the former born February 14, 1829, and the latter January 10, 1835. They were married in Outagamie county. Henry Lipke came to America in 1847 with his mother, his father having died in Germany, and settled at Germantown, Dodge county. He worked as a farm hand for some time, and when twenty years of age came to Outagamie county, and for six years operated a farm in Ellington township. He was then married and continued to live on the homestead for thirty-two years, when he retired and moved to Appleton. In that city the mother died September 23, 1905, and the father continued to live there until removing to the home of Mrs. Mueller, where he died September 24, 1909. Mrs. Mueller was one of two children, and the only survivor. Since her husband's death she has continued on the homestead, operating the farm with the help of her children and has added seventy-eight acres more to the property, in addition to purchasing $1,100 worth of stock. She makes a specialty of registered Holstein cattle and now has a fine herd of twenty-four head. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Mueller, namely: Edward Otto; Henry Arnold, born December 24, 1883, assisting on the home farm; Alvin Steffen, born October 7, 1886, who died April 26, 1905; Emma Henrietta, born January 24, 1889; Helen Hattie, born November 7, 1891, and Bertha Bonita, born January 9, 1894. Edward Otto Mueller was born July 25, 1882, and was educated at the Appleton schools, Lawrence University and the State University, where he took a dairy course. He then learned the cheesemaking trade at Wausau, and was employed at the Eagle Manufacturing Company's plant in Appleton, but since his father's death he has devoted his entire time and attention to the home farm .

ROBERT E. HENRY, a progressive agriculturist of Grand Chute township, who has been engaged in farming and operating a threshing outfit here for a number of years, was born at Spring Lake,Washington county, Wisconsin, October 1, 1876, a son of Frank and Rosetta (Durkee) Henry. Frank Henry was born in Vermont, in April, 1852, and came to Wisconsin with his mother, settling at Spring Lake, where he was taken into the home of a farmer, John Fuller, with whom he resided until he came of age. He then began working for other farmers in that locality and eventually bought a home, in which he lived until 1882. In that year Mr. Henry came to Outagamie county, and worked for farmers in Ellington township for some years, in the meantime learning the trade of cheesemaking. He now resides on his own property in Shiocton, being practically retired. Mrs. Henry, who was born in Fond du Lac county, Wisconsin, about 1861, died March 20, 1881, having been the mother of three children: Robert E.; Gifford, a railroad man of Fond du Lac, and Ida, the wife of Lawrence Webber, a farmer near Shiocton. Mr. Henry was married again, his second wife being Nellie Peebles, a native of Ellington township, and they had three children: Alfred R., a clerk in a Shiocton store; Ethel, single, who resides with her father; and Wilmer, also living at home. Mrs. Henry died May 9, 1911. Frank Henry became one of the prominent men of his community, serving as notary public for a number of years, and also as justice of the peace, a position which he still holds. Robert E. Henry attended school in Ellington township, Spring Lake and Bovina townships, and at the age of eleven years started to work among the farmers for his board and clothing. He earned his first wages when fourteen years of age on neighboring farms, and also spent six or seven winters in the woods, as well as being employed in threshing machine outfits during the fall of the year. When he was married he moved to his present property, which he rents, and he is now operating it as a general farm. He is the owner of an up-to-date, highly improved threshing outfit, and this he operates during season. On July 2, 1904, Mr. Henry was married to Lena Moehring, who was born in Bovina township, Outagamie county, December 6, 1877, daughter of Ernest and Sophia (Morhle) Moehring, the former born in Germany and the latter in Sheboygan county, Wisconsin .

Mr. Moehring came to America at the age of nineteen years and learned the cooper trade at Sheboygan, and after his marriage removed to Bovina township, where he and his wife still reside. He has served as township assessor, chairman of the township board and in other capacities, and is one of the prosperous and influential farmers of his township, where he still operates his farm. He and his wife had ten children: George, residing on a farm near his father; John, a grocer, of Evanston, Illinois; Josephine, the wife of Gustave Schiebe, a merchant of Evanston; Mrs. Henry; Martha, the wife of Frank Minck, a resident of Hanford, California; Jennie, the wife of George Brown, a farmer of Cicero township; Benjamin, residing with his father; Richard, a farmer of Freedom township, near Seymour; Alfred, who is single and lives with his parents; and Lillie, who is deceased .

Mr. and Mrs. Henry have had two children: Leonard, born February 8, 1908, and Ernest, born January 28, 1911. Mr. Henry is a member of the Odd Fellows and the F.R.A., and in political matters is an independent Republican.

JOSEPH LEMPKE, who is a thrifty and prosperous farmer of Greenville township, owning and operating forty acres of good farming land, was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, December 8, 1860, and is a son of John and Caroline (Peters) Lempke. The family came to the United States in 1868, John Lempke purchasing a farm in Greenville township after four years spent in working for farmers in this community. He became the owner of forty acres of land, and here he continued to carry on agricultural pursuits until his death in 1898, his wife having passed away in about 1891. Joseph Lempke was the sixth in order of birth of the nine children born to his parents, and he received a limited education in the public schools of his district, beginning to work on his father's farm as soon as he was old enough to do his share. He then went to work by the month for John Culbertson, with whom he continued seven summers, after which he was employed by different farmers in Greenville township until 1892, at which time he located on his present forty-acre farm, which he had purchased during the previous year. He has made many improvements on this property, and now has a well-cultivated and finely equipped farm, on which stand good, substantial buildings. He devotes his entire time to his farming operations and operates along general lines, breeding some stock for his own use. His religious connection is with the Reformed Church at Dale, Wisconsin, and in political matters he is a Republican, but has never aspired to office. On March 16, 1892, Mr. Lempke was married to Louisa Weesenberg, who was born in Greenville township, April 28, 1858, daughter of Christ and Sophia (Alms) Weesenberg, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany, both of whom died in Greenville township, where Mr. Weesenberg was the owner of a farm, the former January 18, 1897, and the latter March 4, 1873. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Lempke, namely: LeRoy, born January 15, 1893, residing at home; and Ray, born February 10, 1896; and Ralph, born April 7, 1898, both of whom are deceased .

CHRIST JULIUS, who has been operating a farm in Greenville township for more than thirty-five years, is one of the well-known residents of this section, and was born in Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, March 5, 1849, a son of Fred and Louisa (Dahoe) Julius, natives of the Fatherland, from whence they came in 1854 and located in Greenville township. Fred Julius purchased a farm of eighty acres for $200, and while engaged in clearing and improving this land, he also worked for others to get money on which to live. After about twenty years he sold this land and bought a tract of 120 acres in the southern part of Greenville township, where he resided until his death, about 1890 or 1891, his widow surviving him several years. They were the parents of the following children: Fred, a retired citizen of Oshkosh, Wisconsin; John, a Greenville township farmer; Christ; Charles, also engaged in farming in this township; Louisa, the wife of John Staffeld, a resident of Neenah; William, who, died in Vancouver; and Henry, employed in a factory in Neenah. Fred Julius served in the regular army in his native country. Christ Julius received a limited training in the schools of Greenville township, but most of his education was secured in the school of hard work, for as soon as he was able to reach the plow handles he started in to do his share of the hard work on the farm. He remained on the old homestead, turning his wages over to his father until he was twenty-five years old, and then purchased a farm in Ellington township, which he eventually traded for an eighty-acre tract in Cicero township. This he in turn traded for fifty acres of his present land, and at that time was married, April 6, 1874, to Mary Topp, who was born in New York State, February 25, 1854, daughter of John and Sophia (Ellis) Topp, natives of Mecklenburg-Schwerin, Germany, the father born March 17, 1820, and the mother March 8 ,1818. They came to the United States in 1857, and for six years resided in New York, after which they came to Clayton township, Outagamie county. They spent six years on that property and then bought a small farm in Greenville township, on which the family made its home for eighteen years, after which they sold out and went to live with Mr. Julius, at whose home both died in 1896. They had three children: John, who is deceased; Mary; and an infant, deceased. Mr. Topp was also a member of the regular army in Germany .

Mr. Julius now has an excellent property of ninety acres, well equipped with modern buildings and up-to-date machinery. He has been a member of the Grange since boyhood, is also connected with the Equitable Fraternal Union, and is a Lutheran and an independent Democrat. He and Mrs. Julius have had seven children, as follows: William, born March 12, 1878, who died in May, 1881; Anna, born January 25, 1881; Lucinda, born May 8, 1884; Augusta, born January 3, 1886; Amanda, born January 15, 1889; Frank, born March 19, 1891; and Jennie, born June 15, 1894 .

ALEXANDER CULBERTSON, who during a long and useful career has carried on agricultural pursuits in Greenville township, has watched the country grow from a wilderness into one of the most prosperous sections in Outagamie county, and has done his share in bringing this condition of things about. Born February 2, 1834, in Jefferson county, Indiana, Mr. Culbertson is a son of John and Margaret (Ried) Culbertson, natives of Scotland, who came to the United States in 1822 and settled immediately in Jefferson county, Indiana, Mr. Culbertson's brothers having preceded him to that frontier state. He remained there until 1848, when he came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, with a son, who remained on his new farm when he returned to Indiana. He came again to Outagamie county in 1858, settling on the northeast corner of section 30, where he built a homestead and engaged in farming until his death in 1877. His wife passed away in Indiana in 1854. Their children were: James, deceased, who came to Outagamie county in 1849; Matthew, who came here in 1848 and erected either the first or the second cabin in Greenville township, and is now deceased; John, who came to Greenville township in 1852, cleared a farm and resided in the township until a few years prior to his death, when he went to Appleton; Jeanette, who married David Scott, deceased, a former resident of Switzerland county, Indiana, and later married Charles Ryan, who is also deceased, and she still resides in that county; Alexander; Margaret, widow of Lawrence Barclay, now residing in Appleton; and Nancy, widow of Osias De Long, residing in Zion City, Illinois. Alexander Culbertson received a good common school education in the Caledonia school in Jefferson county, Indiana, and was reared to the life of an agriculturist. He resided with his father until he was twenty-one years old and then came to Greenville township, three years previous to his father's arrival, his route being by train to Chicago, thence by steamer to Sheboygan, thence by steamer from Fond du Lac to Menasha, and on to the northeast quarter of section 21, township 21, range 16. No roads led to his property and he was forced to follow a trail through the wilderness, his first home being a rude log cabin in which he lived a year before building a more comfortable home, and his present residence was built by him in 1873, his barns having been built in 1861 and 1875. He now has 200 acres under cultivation, which he devotes to general farming, and he has the reputation of being a good, practical farmer and first-class citizen. He is a member of the United Presbyterian Church, and in political matters he is a Republican, but has never aspired to public preferment, although on one occasion, in 1858, he served as superintendent of township schools. On April 15, 1869,Mr. Culbertson was united in marriage with Sylvina M. Perry, who was born in Greenville township, October 12, 1850, daughter of Miles R. and Achsah (Eldred) Perry, natives of Otsego county, New York, from whence they came in 1849, locating in section 26, Greenville township. Mr. Perry cleared a farm from the wilderness, and spent the active years of his life thereon, but after his retirement he removed to the home of Mr. Culbertson, and there he died July 12, 1890, aged 68 years, his wife passing away May 4, 1902, when 81 years of age. They had three children, of whom Mrs. Culbertson is the oldest; Nancy is deceased, and Libbie is the wife of Joseph Leppla, a resident of section 19, Greenville township. Mr. and Mrs. Culbertson have had six children, namely: Miles J., born February 9, 1870, who died February 16, 1877; Frank, born June 23, 1871, a farmer of Seymour township; Perry, born February 14, 1873, also a farmer of Seymour township; Archie, born March 21, 1875, who died February 22, 1877; Harvey, born December 16, 1877, who is residing on the old homestead; and Percy, born September 4, 1879, who died April 28, 1906 .

WILLIAM REICK, the owner of a well-cultivated tract of sixty acres in Greenville township, and one of the practical farmers and public-spirited citizens of this section, was born in Greenville township, June 4, 1863, a son of Charles and Mary (Denkter) Reick, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany. They came to the United States about 1856, first settling in Manitowoc county, where Mr. Reick worked for others as a farm hand, receiving his salary in provisions, and about two years later came to Greenville township, where Mr. Reick rented a farm. He then bought a property in Grand Chute township, consisting of eighty acres, and had started to clear and cultivate it, when he was drafted into the Union army, and served until the close of the Civil War. He had gotten as far as Milwaukee on his return, when he suddenly died from the effects of his army service. He was a private in the Fiftieth Regiment of Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. In the meantime, the mother and her three small children had been living in the little shanty that they had rented, and after her first husband's death, Mrs. Reick was married to Charles Bensch, and moved to a farm in Grand Chute township, which they later sold to move to another property in Greenville, and there Mrs. Bensch died in 1887. She had three children by her first marriage: Lenna W., wife of Theodore Huffman, a carpenter of Appleton; John, a resident of this township and a carpenter by trade; and William. There were five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Bensch. William Reick attended the district schools of Grand Chute township, giving up his studies at the age of thirteen years to commence working as a farm hand, although he gave his earnings to his father until he was twenty-one years old. He then learned the mason's trade, which he followed for six years, when he purchased his present farm. Since coming here in 1889, Mr. Reick has made many improvements on his property, including a modern residence and barn, and his sixty acres are in a fine state of cultivation. He was married October 22, 1889, to Emma Schroth, who was born in Ellington township, Outagamie county, June 23, 1868, daughter of George and Mary (Bahler) Schroth, natives of Germany. George Schroth, who was an early settler and land owner of Ellington township, served during the Civil War and died soon after the close thereof, while his widow survived him until 1903. Mr. and Mrs. Reick have had three children: Selma, born September 1, 1890: Nelta, born October 25, 1894; and Wilbert, born May 7, 1903. Mr .and Mrs. Reick are members of the Lutheran Church. He is an independent voter, and is socially connected with the Equitable Fraternal Union.

FRANK BURMEISTER, one of the successful young agriculturists of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who is engaged in cultivating the old Burmeister homestead in Cicero township, was born March 14, 1881, on the farm on which he now resides, and is a son of Christian and Dora (Lausch) Burmeister. John and Mary (Hocker) Burmeister, the grandparents of Frank Burmeister, came to this country from Germany, in 1873, and settled in Center township, where they remained during the rest of their lives. They had fourteen children, of whom seven grew to maturity and established homes, namely: John, Joachim, Christian, Henry, William, Sophia and Fred. Christian Burmeister was born in Mecklenberg-Schwerin, Germany, and was there married in 1867 to Dora Lausch, who was born November 3, 1844, daughter of Carl and Hannah (Heiden) Lausch, who spent their lives in that country. Mrs. Burmeister has a sister Sophia, and brother, John, residing in the Fatherland. Christian and Dora Burmeister had one son born to them in the old country, Henry, whose birth occurred November 22, 1869, and he died at the age of thirty-one years, as did also Charles, who was born in Center township in 1874. The other children, all born in America, were: Mrs. Bertha Trost, of Cicero township, born April 14, 1878; Frank, born March 14, 1881; and George, born July 4, 1884. Christian and Dora Burmeister left Germany for America in 1872, on a sailing vessel that took seven weeks to complete the journey, suffering many hardships during the passage, principally from hunger, as the only food obtainable was that which they had brought with them, and during the last several days of the trip all the sustenance they could get was a little tea at supper time. On reaching this country they made their way to Outagamie county, settling in Center township, where they resided until 1877, and in that year settled on the present property, where Mrs. Burmeister, with Frank and George, still resides. During the first year they worked out among the farmers of this vicinity to get a start, and eventually acquired two cows, during the following year purchasing a yoke of oxen. They then started to clear their property, which is now all under cultivation, and here Mr. Burmeister died in 1896, aged fifty-nine years. The mother and boys have a fine, comfortable residence, a large barn and granary, and other substantial buildings, and their property is one of the valuable tracts of Cicero township .

JOHN D. HAM, one of the old and honored residents of Bovina township, and a veteran of the great Civil War, is carrying on farming operations on a tract of forty acres situated in section 33. He was born September 12, 1841, in Balston, Saratoga county, New York, and is a son of Peter A. and Margaret (DuBois) Ham. On his father's side Mr. Ham is descended from German ancestors, while on the maternal side he is of German, English and French extraction. His parents were both born in New York, and came to Wisconsin about 1850, settling in Winnebago county, where Peter Ham purchased eighty acres of prairie land. He erected a house on this uncultivated property, and here resided for thirty-two years, at the end of which time he had it all under cultivation. He died August 5, 1885, at the age of seventy-nine years, and was buried in the cemetery at Stephensville. Mrs. Ham, who died March 1, 1875, at the age of seventy-two years, was interred at Vineland cemetery. They had a family of six children, of whom John D. was the youngest, and but one other, Charles H., of San Diego, California, now survives. Four of the boys were soldiers during the Civil War. Ransom B. was a member of Company G, First Wisconsin Cavalry and served three years. Edward P. enlisted in Company B, Twenty-first Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and died in the hospital at Bowling Green, Kentucky, from an attack of typhoid fever. Charles A. enlisted in a New York battery of the Light Artillery and served until the close of the war. John D. Ham enlisted in January, 1862, for service in the First Regiment, Wisconsin Cavalry, but on account of an accident when his horse fell on his foot he was disabled so that he was prevented from serving in that regiment. In 1863, however, he was drafted for three years or during the war, and although still quite lame from the previously mentioned accident, he reported for examination at Green Bay, Wisconsin, and at the examination stated to the examining surgeon that there was nothing the matter with him except the injury to his left foot. After a thorough examination the surgeon asked him if the injury caused him much trouble, to which he replied, "No." The surgeon then said that he guessed he would have to go, to which Mr. Ham replied that he was glad of it as he wanted to go, whereupon the former said he was glad to see one man who desired to go to war. Mr. Ham was first in Company G, First Wisconsin Infantry, but during the fall of 1864 was transferred to Company E, Twenty-first Regiment, and in June, 1865, was transferred to Company E, Third Wisconsin Veteran Volunteers, and from which he was finally mustered out of service at the close of the war. During all the engagements in which his company participated, Mr. Ham proved himself a brave and faithful soldier, and when the close of the war came none had a better record for stanchness under fire, adherence to duty or efficiency and faithfulness than he. Alfred Ham, the oldest brother of the subject of this sketch, was drafted at the same time and successfully passed the examination, but, having a family of small children to provide for, his father, Peter A. Ham, paid the commutation money amounting to $300, and thus exempted him from military duty. Four of the sons of Peter A. Ham served in the Union army, the fifth and only remaining one was exempted upon the payment by his father of the $300 commutation. On completing his services to his country, Mr. Ham returned to Wisconsin and during two or three winters attended school, the summer months being spent in work on the home farm. In about 1868 he bought his father's farm, which he conducted until 1882, and then moved to Outagamie county, where he carried on operations in Ellington township about six years. In 1889 he bought the property which he now operates, an improved tract with a house and outbuildings, and here he has since been engaged in gardening. He has remodeled the buildings and fenced his property, and has carried on general farming, although his, principal products are strawberries and cabbages .

In 1880 Mr. Ham was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Moore, who was born November 8, 1865, daughter of John and Alvira (Freeman) Moore, natives of England and New York, respectively, who were married in Wisconsin, whence they had come years before the war. They settled in Waushara county, but later removed to Winnebago county, where Mr. Moore died in 1892, at the age of sixty-seven years, and was buried in Winneconne Cemetery. Mrs. Moore is now living in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, being seventy-seven years old. Mr. and Mrs. Ham have been the parents of six children: Margaret, who married Dexter Smith, of Shiocton, has two children; Jessie, who married William Laird, living in Outagamie county; Bessie, who is single and teaching school in Outagamie county; Carrie, who married Moritz Strong, of Outagamie county; and Earl and Irwin, living at home. Mr. Ham is a Republican in politics, and he has served one term as town clerk, and as clerk of the school board for eleven years. He and his family attend the Congregational Church at Shiocton .

GERHARD LETTMANN, a prosperous German-American citizen of Bovina township, Outagamie county, whose sixty-acre farm is situated in section 35, is a son of Henry Gerhard and Margaret (Warns) Lettmann, who spent their entire lives in Germany. Gerhard Lettmann was born June 1, 1842, in Germany, coming to the United States in 1868, on July 4th of which year he landed in New York. He came directly to Wisconsin, and for one year worked on a farm in Ellington township, Outagamie county, the two years following being spent in work in a sawmill. During the second year thus spent, he bought sixteen acres of woodland at Stevensville, on which he built a one-room house, 12x16 feet, four years later building an addition 12x16 feet, in which he lived for about twenty-seven years, and during this time he worked at various occupations, one of his positions being that of mail carrier between Hortonville and Stephensville, for which he received $130 per year. He also worked in the sawmills and at other occupations during the winters and on the farms of the neighborhood in the summers, and in 1896 he sold his property and bought an almost wild farm, on which he now lives. He now has forty acres under the plow, and the remainder of the property, with the exception of four acres, all cleared and being used as pasture land. He is engaged in general farming and stock raising, has good, substanitial buildings, and his property is fenced with barbed wire, while woven wire will soon be put in. The little house which he built on his first property at Stephensville, is still standing and has been remodeled .

In 1871 Mr. Lettmann was married to Miss Minnie Lohrence, a native of Germany, who died in 1875, having been the mother of three children, of whom one is living: George, a resident of Colorado, who is married and has three children. In 1876 Mr. Lettmann was married (second) to Miss Sophia Heiden, who was born May 17, 1858, daughter of Joachim and Helen Heiden, natives of Germany. They came to the United States in 1868 and settled in Outagamie county, both dying at the home of Mr. Lettmann, the father in 1883 at the age of fifty-three years, and the mother in March, 1902, when eighty-two years old. Mr. and Mrs. Lettmann have had ten children: Matilda, who married Claud Earl, of New London, has two children; William, who married Catherine Callan, has three children; Henry, who married Grace Hazen, living in Spokane, Washington; Marie, who married Rudolph Schwandt, living in Shiocton, has two children; and Otto, Louis, Ella, Dorothea, Harry and Lydia, all single and living at home. The home farm is now being operated by Louis Lettmann, the father having been incapacitated for hard work. In politics Gerhard Lettmann is a Republican, and with his family he attends the Lutheran Church of Shiocton, of which he is an active and liberal member .

CHARLES COLWITZ, residing on a finely-cultivated farm of 120 acres, located in sections 28 and 30, Bovina township; was the first settler of this section, and during the seventeen years that he has lived here has watched the country develop from a wild, uncultivated swamp land to some of the finest farming country in the county. Mr. Colwitz was born August 4, 1852, in Germany, a son of Charles and Ricca (Marks) Colwitz, who came to this country when he was four years old. The parents of Mr. Colwitz settled in Calumet county, Wisconsin, where the father purchased 100 acres of wild land, the country then being in a wild state and peopled with Indians, who, however, were not troublesome. He spent forty years on this farm, during which time he cleared fifty acres, and in spite of many disheartening misfortunes managed to become the possessor of a good, valuable farm. The first log house built by him was destroyed by fire, but this was replaced by a better one made of frame, and other substantial buildings were also erected. At another time all of his cattle died from some strange disease, but he did not let himself become discouraged, setting about to procure a new herd, and when he died at the age of sixty-six years, at Brothertown, he was in comfortable circumstances and had the respect and esteem of all who knew him. Mrs. Colwitz also passed away at Brothertown, when seventy years of age, and both were buried in Calumet Cemetery .

Charles Colwitz was the eldest of his parents' six children, and he was twenty-four years of age when he started farming for himself on rented property. One year later he bought eighty acres in Calumet county, but after eight years here and one year on the eighty acres adjoining, he went to Brillion, Calumet county, where he established himself in the livery business. Three or four years later he removed his business to Kaukauna, Outagamie county, and he carried on a flourishing business at the latter place for four years, when a disastrous fire destroyed his harness, buggies, wagons, household goods, and in fact all of his other possessions, which were totally without insurance. Thus stripped of his worldly goods, Mr. Colwitz decided to make a new start, and in 1894 came to Bovina township and bought his present farm, at that time all swamp land on which no improvements whatever had been made. He erected buildings, drained the land, cleared the timber and brush, and started in to break the land for planting, and he now has 100 acres under cultivation, most of which is fenced with barbed wire. He is now engaged in general farming and stock raising, and gives special attention to dairying. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the Lutheran Church, his wife being of the Congregational faith .

In 1876, Mr. Colwitz was married to Miss Clara Pillsbury, born November 8, 1859, the eldest of the four children of Granville and Harriet (Parker) Pillsbury, natives of Illinois. Granville Pillsbury enlisted for service in the Civil War, and at the battle of Gettysburg he was captured and confined in Libby Prison, where he died. He was captured in a deep railway cut while engaged in tearing up ties in order to cut off rebel supplies. While thus employed the detachment of which he was a member was captured by a superior force of the enemy and were almost all starved to death in the notorious Andersonville prison. Mrs. Pillsbury was married (second) to Stephen Hibbard, and now lives at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, having reached the age of sixty-nine years. Mr. and Mrs. Colwitz have four children: Mabell, who married Walter Bruse and lives at Shiocton; Peter, who married Annie Clasen, and lives with his parents; Laura, who married Clarence Butler, who died in 1910, and she is now living in New London; and Francis, who died at the age of seventeen years .

CHARLES P. OAKS. Agricultural conditions in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, have changed to such an extent during the past several decades that the enterprising farmer has been compelled to change to a large degree his methods of treating the soil. New discoveries have been made, powerful machinery invented and new innovations introduced, and he who would reap the most beneficial results from his property must keep himself conversant with the changes of the times, or put his lands under the supervision of one who is possessed of a thorough and comprehensive knowledge of conditions. Charles P. Oaks, a scientific farmer of Outagamie county, who is operating a tract of 420 acres in Bovina and Liberty townships for C. W. Greenfield, of Chicago, Illinois, is a native of Wisconsin, having been born in Tustin, Waushara county, April 25, 1873, son of Milford G. and Lydia (Bennett) Oaks, natives of New York State, who were married in Wisconsin. They are now living in Winneconne, Winnebago county, the father, who has been an agriculturist all of his life, being seventy years of age, and the mother having reached the age of sixty-eight years. They had a family of eight children .

Charles P. Oaks received his education in the district schools in the vicinity of his father's farm, and until eighteen years of age remained on the family homestead. At this time he started out to work for wages, but after about five years he came to his present position, where he carries on extensive general farming, dairying and stockraising operations. The land is under cultivation with the exception of forty acres, and yields large crops. Mr. Oaks milks on an average of thirty cows, makes his own butter in the winter months, and during the summer seasons sends his milk to the cheese factories. In 1890 Mr. Oaks was married to Catherine Hooper, born January 14, 1873, the eldest daughter of William and Lois (Simons) Hooper, natives of New York State, who were married in Wisconsin. Mrs. Hooper died in Winneconne, Wisconsin, in 1876, and Mr. Hooper, who was a fisherman by occupation, passed away at the age of seventy-six years, in 1902. Mr. and Mrs. Oaks have had three children. Nellie, William and Marie. They are consistent attendants of the Congregational Church at Shiocton. In politics Mr. Oaks is a Republican, and his fraternal connection is with the Modern Woodmen of America .

ERNEST SPOEHR, an enterprising agriculturist of Bovina township, who owns 356 acres in sections 4 and 5, is a member of an old and honored family which has been located in Outagamie county for upwards of sixty years. He was born on the farm which he now owns, November 20, 1866, and is a son of Ernest and Matilda (Schultz) Spoehr, natives of Germany. The parents of Mr. Spoehr were married in Outagamie county, where Mr. Spoehr had located in 1851, and after a long and useful life spent in agricultural pursuits here he is now retired and living at Hortonville, being seventy-four years of age. His wife died in May, 1896, aged forty-eight years. Ernest Spoehr, Sr., enlisted during the Civil War as a private in a Wisconsin infantry regiment, and served two years, receiving his honorable discharge after a brave and faithful service, and he is now a member of Hortonville Post, Grand Army of the Republic. Ernest Spoehr, Jr., was the eldest of six children, and his youth was spent in the hard work of the farm up to the time when he was fifteen years of age, when he started working for wages at lumbering and river driving. He continued at this work until his marriage in 1896 to Miss Annie Witthuhn, who was born January 24, 1876, the eldest of the children of Charles and Louisa (Dikelman) Witthuhn, natives of Germany, who came to America in early life and are now living in Bovina township. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Spoehr, namely: Roy, Wilford, Frederick and Nicholas, all residing at home. After his marriage, Mr. Spoehr engaged in farming for himself on the old homestead, which he eventually purchased from his father, and he now has eighty acres under cultivation and 151 acres enclosed in a barbed and woven wire fence. Since coming into possession of the property, Mr. Spoehr had remodeled both the house and the barn, in addition to erecting outbuildings and making other improvements. General farming and stock raising have been his chief occupations, and he has made a specialty of dairying. He keeps Poland-China hogs and Holstein cattle, and devotes a large part of his property to pasture land. Mr. Spoehr is a member of the Odd Fellows, is a Republican in his political belief, and with Mrs. Spoehr attends the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which they are active members .

WILLIAM H. SPOEHR, a general farmer and stock raiser of Bovina township, and the owner of eighty acres of fine farming land in section 4, is a native of this township, born March 16, 1874, a son of Ernest and Matilda (Schultz) Spoehr. Mr. Spoehr's parents, who were natives of Germany, were married in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, whence they had come when young people, and Mr. Spoehr, who has followed farming throughout his life, is now living at Hortonville, at the age of seventy-four years, his wife having passed away in May, 1896, when forty-eight years old. Ernest Spoehr was a soldier in the Union army during the Civil War, enlisting in May, 1862, in Company D, Fifty-second Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, with which organization he served until the close of the war. He participated in all the engagements in which his regiment took part, including the battle of Gettysburg, and he is now a popular comrade of Hortonville Post, Grand Army of the Republic. When he first located in Outagamie county, in 1851, Appleton was a small village to which he used to go to obtain flour and other necessities, it being the nearest marketing point, and Indians were still numerous around this section, although they were in the main friendly. He has lived to see this great wilderness become converted into a land of prosperity and plenty, and has done his full share in bringing such favorable conditions about .

William H. Spoehr was educated in the district schools, and remained at home on his father's farm until he reached the age of twenty-five years, when he was married, June 1, 1899, to Miss Bertha Witthuhn, born January 11, 1879, daughter of Charles and Louisa (Dikelman), Witthuhn, and to this union there have been born five children: Leland W., Pearl M., William V., Arline L. and Everett C. After marriage, Mr. Spoehr removed to Two Rivers, Wisconsin, where for two years he was employed in the veneering and seating factory, coming back at the end of that time to Bovina township, where for about eight years he was engaged in working at the painter's trade. Mr. Spoehr has since that time been engaged in farming, and he now has all of his property under cultivation with the exception of about five acres. The buildings on the property are well built and conveniently located, the entire property is well fenced with barbed and woven wire, and the farm has a prosperous and well-kept appearance that speaks well for the industry and good management of its owner. Mr. Spoehr is a member of the Odd Fellows, is a Republican in his political views, and is connected religiously with the Methodist Episcopal Church, of which Mrs. Spoehr is also a member .

EDWARD GARDNER, one of the old and honored residents of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who has been a resident of Center township for a period covering nearly sixty years, has been engaged in agricultural pursuits here since he was twelve years old, and has taken an active part in the development and growth of this part of the State. He was born September 30, 1845, in Ohio, one of the thirteen children of Solomon and Eliza (Rogers) Gardner, natives of Ireland and Scotland, respectively, who came to the United States as young people. The father first brought his family from NewYork to Ohio, and from there to Center township, Outagamie county, when Edward Gardner was but seven years old, purchasing a farm of 200 acres located three miles from the present property of our subject. Here Solomon Gardner spent the last years of his life, his death occurring in 1880, in Appleton, whence he had removed a short time before. Mrs. Gardner had passed away about the year 1870 .

Edward Gardner received his education in the district schools of the neighborhood of his father's farm in Center township, and he was reared to the hard life of the pioneer farmer. To use his own words he has "been in the harness since he was twelve years old," and still is active and hearty, performing his daily duties as well as he did years ago, although he has reached an age when most men would consider they had earned a rest from their labors. As a youth he worked out by the month, gaining much experience and little remuneration, but by the time he was ready to marry he had accumulated enough to buy a tract of wild land in Center township, on which he erected a little log cabin. Here, in 1880, he brought his wife, who had been Jeanette McNabb, by whom he had one son: Duncan, who is now conducting a grocery store. Mrs. Gardner died in 1886. In 1908 Mr. Gardner married (second) Emma Bennedict, who is a well-known and popular member of the Presbyterian Church, in the work of which she is very active. Mr. Gardner now has an excellent property, on which a fine, new residence has taken the place of the original log house, and the entire property is in a high state of cultivation. In 1910 Mr. Gardner joined the Odd Fellows at Appleton .

THEODORE SCHULTZ. One of the well-known families of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, is that of Schultz, which is represented in Center township by two well-known agriculturists, Theodore and Edward Schultz, sons of Carl Schultz, the founder of the family in Section 5. Carl Schultz was born in Germany in 1832, and came to the United States as a young man, settling for two or three years near Watertown, Wisconsin, on a rented farm. Here he was married to Tena Hanoldt and moved to Center township, this county, where he purchased eighty acres of wild land, on which he continued to live during the rest of his life, his death occurring in 1895, and that of his wife the year following. They were the parents of thirteen children, of whom seven are still surviving: Julius, born in 1857, married Bertha Bramer, of Black Creek; Charles, born in 1861, married Lizzie Longlutz, of Center; Amelia, born in 1859, married C. F. Meylohn; Theodore; Edward; Tena, born in 1868, married John Sederstrom, of Shawano county; and Firdent, born in 1877, married Mamie Gerhart, of Center. Theodore Schultz was born on his father's farm in Center township, as were all the children, February 14, 1866, and his education was secured in the district schools. He grew up on his father's place, assisting him to clear the land from the wilderness, and after his father's death he, with his brother Edward, started operating the land together. He was married March 29, 1892, to Bertha Cruse, who died in 1894, and his second marriage was to, Amanda Cedarstrong, of Shawano county, occurring April 6, 1899. They had a family of five children: Elmer, born September 9, 1900, who died aged four years; Ferdinand, born January 16, 1903; Henry, born March 12, 1905; Raymond, born June 17, 1907; and Annie, born September 5, 1909. Edward Schultz was born November 6, 1871, and, like his brother, received his schooling in the district schools of the neighborhood and spent his youth on the home farm. The brothers now have their land in an excellent state of cultivation, and the large crops which they raise along scientific lines have found a ready sale in the markets of the vicinity. Both brothers belong to the Evangelical Church .

SERVATUS HOFFMAN, who is engaged in cultivating the soil of Center township, Outagamie county, where he owns an excellent piece of farming property, is a member of an old and honored Wisconsin family, founded here in 1846 by his grandfather, who came to America in 1827 from Germany, and after living in Ohio for nineteen years, came West to Wisconsin and settled in Milwaukee county. Up to this time he had followed the tailoring trade, but on coming West he became engaged in agricultural pursuits, purchasing land near Granville, where he spent the remainder of his life. Philip Hoffman, his son, was born on shipboard while his parents were coming to this country, and he was nineteen years of age when the family located in Wisconsin. At the age of twenty-one years he was married to Margaret Uhlman, and bought a farm in the vicinity of that owned by his father, but eventually moved to Menominee Falls. Later, he retired from active life and located in Fussville, where his death occurred in 1905. Servatus Hoffman was born June 17, 1857, near Granville, Milwaukee county, his education being obtained in the schools of that place and Fussville, and his boyhood was spent on his father's farm. In 1881 he was married to Mary Brill, daughter of Peter Brill, of Waukesha county, and for ten years the young couple lived on the farm of Philip Hoffman. At the end of this time Mr. Hoffman purchased his present farm in Center township, and during the next seven or eight years the family home was a little log house, but now the property is equipped with a large, comfortable residence and good barns and other buildings. Eleven children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman, namely: Lucy and William, who are deceased; Barney, who married Katherine Reuhle, of Green Bay; Peter; Philip; Josephine, who married Leo Gregorius, of Appleton; Rosa, who married Joseph Fischer, of Indiana; Margaret, who is a sister in the convent at Silver Lake; and Christina, Ottilie and Ferdinand, all living at home. Mr. and Mrs. Hoffman are members of St. Edward's Catholic Church at Mackville .

WILLIAM SCHULZE. Outagamie county has its full share of manufacturers, financiers, professional and business men and statesmen, but particularly is it noted for the high standard set by its agriculturists, who have done so much during the past few decades towards making this county one of the garden spots of Wisconsin. One of the representative agriculturists of Outagamie county, who is operating his land along scientific lines, is William Schulze, of Center township. His grandfather, who was the founder of the family in America, was born in Germany, and came to the United States when he was twenty-one or twenty-two years old. He first settled in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, where he worked as a day laborer, but eventually moved to Outagamie county and bought a farm in Greenville township, where his death occurred October 16, 1876. August Schulze, father of William and son of the emigrant, was born in Milwaukee, February 15, 1851, and was four years old when his parents removed to Outagamie county. On June 6, 1872, he was married to Kathrina Lubben, who was fourteen years old when she came with her parents to this country from Germany. John and Sophia Lubben settled in Center township and became well-known and prosperous farming people. Up to the time of his marriage Mr. Schulze had always worked on his father's farm, but after that event he went to Appleton and secured work in the factories, in which he remained for two years. At this time he felt he had saved enough to enable him to invest in some farming land, and accordingly purchased a tract in Ellington township, on which he lived for twenty-seven years. He then sold that land and purchased a farm in Center township, but after ten years here he retired. He died November 23, 1910. Mr. and Mrs. Schulze had four children, namely: William; Robert, who died December 12, 1900, aged twenty-five years; Henrietta, born December 11, 1878, who is living with her brother and mother; and Augusta, who died February 28, 1901, aged eighteen years .

William Schulze was born January 3, 1872, in Ellington township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and received his education in the district schools. At the age of sixteen years he learned the cheese-making trade, which he followed for six years, and then spent the following four years at buttermaking. In 1901 he came to Center township and started to work on the home farm, and since his father's death he has been renting it. Mr. Schulze has a nice property, well-kept and presenting a neat. and prosperous appearance. He has kept the buildings in good repair, and has; made improvements to the comfortable residence, in which he lives with his sister and mother. The family belongs to the German Lutheran Church of Center.

CHARLES J. HAGEN, president of the village of Black Creek, Wisconsin, who is engaged in the retail lumber business and the manufacture of cheese boxes, and is also prominently identified with other large business organizations, was born March 12, 1862, in the town of Lomira, Dodge county, Wisconsin, a son of John and Friedericka (Nehls) Hagen, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany. The parents of Mr. Hagen came to the United States in 1855 and were married in Wisconsin, settling in Dodge county, where the father died in 1871, while the mother still lives in the village of Lomira, having reached the age of eighty years .

Charles J. Hagen was the third of a family of seven children, and his education was secured in the common schools, after leaving which he learned the trade of wagonmaker. When he was twenty years old he came to Black Creek, where he opened a shop and began to follow his trade, and in this line he continued until 1890, at this time entering the box and lumber business, in which he has continued to the present time. His business, which first required the services of but five men, now necessitates the employment of about twenty-five workmen throughout the year. He is also a stockholder and director in the State Bank of Black Creek, organized and incorporated under the State, and of the Four Wheel Drive Automobile Company, of Clintonville, Wisconsin. Mr. Hagen is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America. He is independent in politics, voting rather for the man than the party, and he has been elected to the town clerk's office four terms, was justice of the peace four years, director of the graded schools for eighteen consecutive years, and was the first president of the village of Black Creek, an office in which he has served to the present time. In addition he is serving for the third year as a member of the county board, and in 1904 and again in 1906 was sent to the General Assembly of the State. With his family he attends the Evangelical Protestant Church of Black Creek, being president of the church organization for the sixteen years past ending January 1, 1911, and for twenty years in succession was a member of the board of trustees .

Mr. Hagen was married in 1885 to Miss Louisa Machmiller, born December 22, 1862, the fourth child of the family of five of Andrew and Sophia Machmiller, natives of Brandenberg, Germany, who came to America in the early '60s and settled in Lomira township, Dodge county, where both died. There were seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Hagen, but only four survive, namely: Lora, John, Freda and Lillie, all single and living at home. Mrs. Hagen died August 7, 1899, and was buried in Black Creek. In 1900 Mr. Hagen was married to Miss Mary Mack, daughter of Rev. C. Mack, of Black Creek. She was born April 17, 1877, the eldest of a family of six children. Six children, all living at home, have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hagen, as follows: Irvin, Estella, Victor, Ruth, Esther and Arthur .

FRED C. HAUERT, a representative citizen of Black Creek, Wisconsin, where he is engaged in a large general mercantile business, has been identified with the general growth and development of this village ever since locating here eleven years ago. He was born January 6, 1878, in Brookfield, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, a son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Reineman) Hauert, natives of Germany. The parents of Mr. Hauert were married in Milwaukee, and in 1886 went to Appleton, where the death of the father occurred January 19, 1904, and the mother passed away January 21, 1906, both being buried, at Riverside cemetery. Fred C. was the next to the youngest of their nine children .

Fred C. Hauert received a common school education at Appleton, and when but fifteen years of age commenced working for himself, securing employment in a retail grocery store in Appleton, and then, after five years, learning the tinner's trade. After three years he went to Milwaukee, where he worked at his trade for one and one-half years, and he then returned to Appleton, where he followed his trade for eight years. On July 28, 1900, Mr. Hauert came to Black Creek and established himself in business, buying out a general merchandise firm, and here he has continued to the present time, his business increasing steadily. He is the owner of the building in which he conducts his business, and of the residence in which he resides. Mr. Hauert is a member of the E. F. U. He is a Democrat in politics, and has served as a trustee of the village for three years. With Mrs. Hauert he attends St. John's Evangelical Protestant Church of Black Creek .

In 1894 Mr. Haluert was married to Miss Emma Fisher, daughter of Edward and Bertha (Durdell) Fisher, natives of Berlin, Germany, and Paris, France, respectively. Mrs. Fisher came to America with her parents when she was five years old, and Mr. Fisher was fifteen years old when he came to this country. They were married in Appleton, Wisconsin, and are now living at Tower, Wyoming. Mrs. Hauert, who was the eldest of the fourteen children of her parents, was born June 3, 1876. She and Mr. Hauert have had two children: Elsie and Sidney .

JOHN JAMISON LAIRD, M. D., a well-known medical practitioner of Black Creek, Wisconsin, where he has been engaged in practice for the past several years, is serving as president of the Black Creek School Board and as health officer of the village. He was born in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, June 15, 1877, and is a son of Alexander and Agnes (Jamison) Laird, natives of Ireland. Alexander Laird came to the United States in 1857 and bought 132 acres of wild land in Ellington township, Outagamie county, on which he erected a log cabin and continued to operate it until 1869, when he returned to his native country and got his family, whom he brought to the new home. On his return he continued to cultivate his property and make improvements, and he now has a fine farm, fenced with woven wire and rails, graded and watered, and in an excellent state of cultivation. Here he and his wife still reside, Mr. Laird being seventy-one years old and his wife sixty-six. They had a family of seven children, of whom John J. was the fifth in order of birth .

John Jamison Laird received his education in the public schools of his native vicinity and in 1887 graduated from the Ryan School in Appleton. After teaching school for two years he took a course at Lawrence College, and in 1904 graduated from Rush Medical College, Chicago, with the degree of M. D. Locating in Black Creek, he began practice, and here he has since built up a large patronage. In 1905 he was married to Miss Bernice Estey, born December 16, 1881, the fourth of the six children of John L. and Margaret Estey, natives of New Brunswick, who came to Appleton, Wisconsin, in 1882. The mother died at this city in May, 1910, and Mr. Estey now makes his home at San Diego, California. Early in life Mr. Estey learned the carpenter's trade, but during later years became engaged in mining and for a long period was a mine superintendent. Mr. and Mrs. Laird have had four children: John A.; Howard J., who died in infancy; Kenneth J., and Bruce Estey .

Dr. Laird is a member of the E. F. U. and the F. R. A. He is independent in politics and is president of the school board and health officer. With Mrs. Laird he attends the Congregational Church, being treasurer of the church organization and a member of the board of trustees .

JOHN KESSLER, postmaster of Black Creek, Wisconsin, who for many years engaged in the mercantile business in this village, has been living retired for the past eight years, his only activities being in the performance of his official duties. Mr. Kessler is a native of Switzerland, where he was born May 4, 1848, the only child of J. J. and Elizabeth Kessler, the latter of whom died in Switzerland when she was fifty years old, after which, in 1886, the father came to America and located in Black Creek, where his death occurred in 1892 .

John Kessler remained at home with his parents until 1880, during which year he came to the United States, and first settled in Illinois, in which State he remained for about one year. He then went to Appleton, Wisconsin, where he worked for five years as a clerk in a general store, and at the end of this period he removed to a rented farm for one year. Returning to Appleton, he continued to reside here for six months, and then bought eighty acres of land in Black Creek township, on which there were three or four acres cleared, and when he left this property twelve years later, he had cleared sixty-five acres. He came to Black Creek village in 1896 and bought out a mercantile business, which he conducted in addition to his farm, but a short time later sold this store and returned to the farm. Inside of a year he returned to the village, and made a trade whereby he came into possession of a store in Black Creek, and this he conducted for six and one-half years, when he sold the business and retired from all activities other than those of postmaster, which he became in 1901, and assessor. He is a Republican in politics, and in addition to the two offices just mentioned he was township clerk for ten years, treasurer of the village for two terms, treasurer of the school board for six years, and a delegate to the Congressional convention in 1902. He and his family attend the services of St. John's Evangelical Church .

In 1873 Mr. Kessler was united in marriage with Miss Barbara Tischhauser, who was born in June, 1849, daughter of John and Barbara (Guldi) Tischhauser, natives of Switzerland, who spent their lives there. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Kessler: Adolph, who died single at the age of thirty-three years; John, who died at the age of twelve years; Elizabeth, who married Herbert Wright, of Menominee, Michigan, and has four children and Margaret, who married Earl Boyden, of Seymour, Wisconsin, and has two children .

FRANK HUSE, an influential citizen and practical agriculturist of Black Creek Township, Outagamie county, residing on his fine farm of 100 acres located on Section 20, is a son of George and Elizabeth (Farnum) Huse, and was born in the town of Ellington, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, November 4, 1852. George Huse was born in Massachusetts, and was a soldier during the Mexican War, after the close of which he came to Wisconsin and took up a land grant of 160 acres in Ellington. He was married in Freedom, Wisconsin, to Elizabeth Farnum, a native of New York State, and they started married life on the farm which he had taken up a short time before. A short time later, however, Mr. Huse sold this property and went to live in Stephensville for a short period, after which he came to Black Creek township and purchased 160 acres of wild land from the Fox River Company. Here he continued to carry on agricultural pursuits until his death, May 7, 1881, at the age of sixty-six years, after which the mother sold sixty acres of land, while the family continued to operate the other 100 acres. This land now belongs to Frank Huse, who has sixty acres under cultivation. Mrs. Huse died in May, 1892, aged seventy-three years. She had been the mother of five children, Frank being next to the eldest. He secured his education in the public schools of Outagamie county, after leaving which he worked on the home farm until reaching the age of twenty-one years, at the end of this time securing employment in the woods at lumbering and river driving. After ten years spent in this kind of work, he had accumulated forty acres of land, and this he partly cleared and sold. For a number of years thereafter he was engaged in working at the carpenter's trade, and in the spring of 1894 commenced cultivating the old homestead farm, where he now carries on general operations and stockraising, and markets hogs, cattle and dairy products. His efforts have met with a satisfactory degree of success, and his farm shows the beneficial effect of well-directed labor .

On December 30, 1894, Mr. Huse was married to Miss Sophia Mielke, born April 5, 1869, the sixth of the thirteen children of Adam and Minnie Mielke, natives of Germany, who were married in Wisconsin. They came to Outagamie county in 1878 and settled in the town of Cicero, where Mr. Mielke still lives, at the age of seventy-nine years, Mrs. Mielke having died April 13, 1906, at the age of sixty-eight years. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Huse, namely: Henry L., Dewey F., John E., Electie J., Frances G. and Goldier K. In political matters Mr. Huse is a Republican. With his family he attends the Black Creek Methodist Episcopal Church .

ABIJAH W. KANOUSE, M. D., dean of the medical profession of Appleton, Wisconsin, who has been engaged in practice in that city for thirty-one consecutive years, was born in Washtenaw county, Michigan, August 24, 1845, a son of Elijah D. and Sarah (Wood) Kanouse. Elijah D. Kanouse was born August 28, 1820, in New Jersey, and died October 6, 1908, and his wife was born in Danbury, Connecticut, October 16, 1821, and died June 8, 1900. The grandfather of Abijah W., Rev. John George Kanouse, was born in Morris county, New Jersey, February 10, 1800, and his father, Jacob, was born in Wittenberg, Germany, August 12, 1733. He came to America in 1750, and settled in Morris county, New Jersey, from whence he enlisted in the Revolutionary War. Rev. John George Kanouse, a Presbyterian minister, left New Jersey for Newark, Wayne county, New York, and thence, in 1832, to Washtenaw county, Michigan. In 1844 he located on a wild farm of 300 acres in Dane county, Wisconsin, and there his death occurred when he was seventy years of age, of pneumonia. During his entire life he never received salary for preaching the Gospel. He had a family of eight boys and one girl, all of whom came to Dane county, and at the time of his death. his was the first in his immediate family of over 100 direct descendants. In addition to being a preacher and farmer, John George Kanouse was a doctor, and was one of the earliest converts to homeopathy, his son, Elijah D., studying under his preceptorship, and later becoming a student in a Cleveland college. He returned to Wisconsin and engaged in practice, and at the time of his death, at the age of eighty-nine years, was an authority on the teachings of this school of medicine. He had three children, as follows: Edward M., a veteran of the Civil War, and a homeopathic doctor of wide reputation, who died May 25, 1903, leaving a widow and one son, Robert B. Kanouse; Abijah W.; and John G., a prominent business man of Los Angeles, California .

Abijah W. Kanouse attended the common and high schools of his locality, and after taking a preparatory course entered Hahnemann Medical College, Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1873. He practiced in Columbia county, Wisconsin, and later in Grant county, but eventually, in 1880, came to Appleton, where he has been in continuous practice to the present time. He is the oldest practitioner in Appleton, and as he expresses it, "has worked without a vacation" since coming here. Dr. Kanouse has a creditable Civil War record, enlisting in August, 1864, and serving until the close of hostilities. He was the eighth member of his family to become a soldier in the Union cause, and is now a popular comrade of the Grand Army of the Republic. He has been connected with the Masonic fraternity since 1876. Dr. Kanouse entered the medical field well equipped, and he has continued to improve himself by study and observation to the present time. He is known over a large territory, has an extensive general practice, and enjoys the confidence and esteem of the people to a marked degree .

In 1879 Dr. Kanouse was married to Mollie Campbell, of Columbus, Wisconsin, a niece of Carl Schurz and a daughter of Benjamin and Ursilla (Jussen) Campbell, and three children have been born to this union: Ralph E., a member of the dental profession of Quincy, Illinois, is married and has two children, Jack and Mary; May, a graduate of Lawrence University, and a well-known teacher of this section; and Carroll B., a resident of Los Angeles, California .

RALPH E. CARNCROSS, a representative business man of Appleton, Wisconsin, who has built up a large real estate, loan and insurance patronage here, was born July 8, 1862, at West Point, Columbia county, Wisconsin, and is a son of L. W. and Harriet E. (Miller) Carncross, the former a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter of New York. L. W. Carncross, who was a farmer and an active participant in local political matters, came to Wisconsin in 1832 and here spent the remainder of his life. Ralph E. Carncross was graduated from the Whitewater Normal School in 1897, and began teaching school in various parts of Wisconsin, coming to Appleton in August, 1903, as principal of the Third and Fifth Ward Schools for one year. From 1904 until 1907 he was occupied as a traveling salesman, and during the latter year he established his present business. He carries on general real estate transactions, with fire insurance and renting, and deals in mortgages and loans, and through his energy and progressive ideas has built up a large and steadily growing business. On July 10, 1902, Mr. Carncross was united in marriage with Miss Demice Vincent, of Hayton, Calumet, county, Wisconsin, daughter of Samuel and Demice (Watrous) Vincent, the former of whom served as sheriff of Calumet county for a long period, and as clerk of the court for twenty-two years. Mrs. Vincent is a sister of Major Watrous, of Milwaukee. To Mr. and Mrs. Carncross there have been born two daughters, namely: Ruth, aged seven years; and Janet, aged ten months. Mr. and Mrs. Carncross are members of the Congregational Church. He is fraternally connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, K. P.'s, and his political opinions are those of the Republican party .

ARTHUR G. MEATING, superintendent of schools of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, has held that office continuously during the past nine years, and is one of the well known educators of the State. Mr. Meating, whose home is in Appleton, is a native of Wisconsin, having been born in New London, Waupaca county, March 22, 1879, a son of George A. and Minnie (Kruger) Meating, the former a native of New Brunswick and the latter of Germany. George A. Meating came to Wisconsin as a young man, and here engaged in the lumber business. He was married to Miss Minnie Kruger, who accompanied her parents to this section as a young woman, and they became the parents of five children, of whom Arthur G. was the eldest. Arthur G. Meating secured his early education in the public schools of New London, and after graduation from the high school at that place he became a teacher, continuing as such until he entered Lawrence University. At the time of his graduation, in 1902, from that institution, he was elected county superintendent of schools for Outagamie county, and he has been the recipient of the election every two years since that time. Under his systematic and efficient management the school system has been greatly improved, various innovations of a practical and beneficial nature having been introduced, and he is popular with students and teachers alike, and holds the esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens to a marked degree. On September 30, 1903, Mr. Meating was married to Ada S. Evans, of Appleton, daughter of Evan and Mary E. Evans, and one child, Elizabeth, aged three and one-half years, has been born to this union. Mr. and Mrs. Meating are members of the Methodist Church. In politics he votes independently .

MATTHIAS SCHMIDT, a prosperous business man of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is proprietor of one of the finest men's furnishing goods and clothing establishments in the city, is a native of the Fatherland, where he was born September 25, 1853, at Hatzenport on the Rhine, a son of Matthias and Gertrude Schmidt. Mr. Schmidt was only four years old when he was brought to the United States by his parents, the family locating near Appleton, where the father purchased land. He died nine months later, however, before he had a chance to improve his property, and his widow later was married to Henry Koehne. Her death occurred in 1874. Mr. Schmidt's three sisters were: Mrs. George Jansen, who died in 1910; Mrs. August Lohmann, who resides in Appleton, and Mrs. Henry Schuetter, also a resident of this city. Matthias Schmidt (or "Matt," as he is more familiarly known) came to Appleton in 1868, and secured employment with H. A. Phinney in whose men's furnishing goods store he worked for eighteen years, and later was connected with Joseph Spitz in the same line of business for twelve years. In 1898 he decided to engage in business on his own account, and opened an establishment in Appleton with a complete line of wearing apparel for gentlemen. His long experience in this line enabled him to put in a stock of goods which would attract the most careful and exacting buyer. The success which has attended Mr. Schmidt's undertaking has been the result of his constant efforts to please, together with his progressive ideas and business ability. On April 13, 1875, Mr. Schmidt was married to Mary Sauter, daughter of Antone and Katherine Sauter, early settlers of near Appleton, and six children have been born to this union: Katherine, who died May 27, 1908; George A., who is engaged with his father in business, is married and has two children, a son and a daughter; Isabelle, who lives at home; Frank J., a resident of Spokane, Washington; and Gertrude and Rosella, who reside at home. Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt are members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church. He is independent in his political views, voting rather for the man than the party. Mr. Schmidt is the owner of a fine residence in Appleton .

ALBERT H. KRUGMEIER, one of Outagamie county's leading legal practitioners, who is engaged in a large practice in the city of Appleton, was born in Minnesota, June 1, 1873. He is a son of William and Dora Krugmeier, who removed to Dodge county, Wisconsin, soon after his birth .

Mr. Krugmeier was given a high school education at Horicon, and after graduating there entered the Law School of the University of Wisconsin, graduating from there in 1898 .

He located at Appleton for the practice of his profession. At this time he married Jessie Griswold, of Horicon, Wisconsin .

Mr. Krugmeier, by dint of hard study and labor, began to enjoy a good practice. In 1905 he was elected to the office of District Attorney for Outagamie county, and while serving in this capacity directed the trial of one of the most famous murder trials ever tried in Outagamie county. This trial resulted in the conviction of Wenzel E. Kabat for the murder of Michael M. McCarthy. The evidence used by the state was almost entirely circumstantial, the gathering of which consumed much time and labor, but which was found to be impregnable and uncontrovertable .

The brief used and prepared for this case by Mr. Krugmeier is said to have been perfect. It is generally admitted that this case was one of the best ever tried in the State .

Mr. Krugmeier is of German descent, speaks and understands his mother tongue. Whatever time he can spare from his law practice he devotes to a dairy farm located just outside of the city of Appleton, which is a model of cleanliness .

Mr. Krugmeier, politically, is a Republican, and is now serving his second term as Chairman of the Republican County Committee .

CLEMENT E. RYAN, M. D., who is engaged in an extensive medical practice at Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in Dubuque, Iowa, October 8, 1869, a son of Daniel and Mary (Kane) Ryan, the former a native of County Cork, Ireland, and the latter of Pennsylvania. Mr. Ryan's parents, who were farming people of Iowa, where they spent their entire lives, were the parents of five sons and one daughter. Clement E. Ryan's early educational training was secured in the parochial school at Dubuque, and from 1892 until 1897, he attended Valparaiso (Indiana) University, graduating in the latter year from the pharmaceutical department, and immediately went to Anaconda, Deerlodge county, Montana, where for two and one-half years he conducted a drug store. He then decided to enter the medical profession, and subsequently attended the Louisville (Kentucky) Medical College, having received a scholarship from Valparaiso University for excellence in his work there, and graduated in medicine (winning first honors) with the class of 1902. For eight months following he was situated at Murdock, Illinois, and he then located in Appleton, where he has since carried on a very successful general practice. He is a member of the American Medical Society, the Wisconsin Medical Association and the Outagamie County Medical Society, and his professional standing is of the highest. In political matters he is a Democrat, while his religious connection is with the Catholic Church, of which he and Mrs. Ryan are consistent members. In 1899 Dr. Ryan was united in marriage with Miss Margaret O'Donnell, who was born at Chilton, Calumet county, Wisconsin, and to this union there were born a son and a daughter, both of whom are deceased .

FRANK W. HARRIMAN, deceased. When a life full of usefulness comes to its close, it is fitting that a record should be made of those events and characteristics which made the life successful and made its ending a sorrow to those who value the best and noblest qualities among their associates. In the death of Frank Harriman, Appleton lost one of its noblest characters and most useful citizens, one who entwined his active energies with the very life of the community and helped it in a degree that it is hardly able for its citizens to appreciate. Mr. Harriman's public career was such that even his worst enemy could not detract from its brightness as an example for the ambitious youth of this generation. Born April 22, 1861, at Appleton, he was a son of Judge Joseph E. and Celia (Pratt) Harriman, natives of New York. Joseph E. Harriman was born at Louisville, St. Lawrence county, New York, August 14, 1834, and was educated at Milton College and Lawrence University, but suffered greatly from sickness, which disabled him, partially, during the latter part of his life. However, his was the courage that overcomes such obstacles, and he rose to an enviable place among his fellows. Coming to Wisconsin in 1852, he started as a clerk, and from the time when he was first elected treasurer of the city of Appleton, in 1860, he rose rapidly, from alderman and justice of the peace, to Mayor and County Judge, and he also served in the capacities of school treasurer, park commissioner, secretary and treasurer of the Appleton Cemetery Association and various other offices in the gift of the people. He was instrumental in the promoting of many of Appleton's most beneficial public enterprises, and as a man and official was known and esteemed all over the county. He married Celia Pratt, of Milton, Wisconsin, and they had four children: Frank W.; Fred J.; Florian J., and Flora L .

Frank W. Harriman received his education in the public schools of Appleton, and three years after his graduation from the Appleton High School he became a school teacher, serving two years as principal of the Sixth Ward School. He entered his father's office as register of probate, assisting him from 1882 to 1889, during which time he was studying law, and December 21, 1883, was admitted to the bar. He became a very successful lawyer, making a specialty of probate practice. He was a man of superior attainments and attained a large and valuable practice, extending to remote parts. He filled the office of County Judge after the death of his father, serving in that capacity until January 1, 1890, and during the year following was appointed postmaster of Appleton, an office in which he served four years. He was secretary of the Blaine and Logan Club, during the campaign of 1884, was secretary of the County Republican Committee for a long period beginning with 1886, was delegate to a number of conventions and the State and the National Conventions of 1888; was treasurer of the Second School District from 1887 to 1891; was secretary of the Outagamie County Bar Association from the time of organization until his death; was secretary and treasurer of the Appleton Cemetery Association for a long period, and in 1904 was elected to the office of Mayor of Appleton, in which capacity he served favorably for one term. He was also instrumental in establishing the Union High School, and did more, perhaps, for the Appleton school system than any man in the history of the city. Socially, he was connected with the Odd Fellows, in which he filled all the chairs in the Subordinate Lodge and Encampment, was grand warden of the Grand Lodge of the State of Wisconsin, and was Grand Representative of the lodge during 1898. He was an active member of the Congregational Church, in the faith of which he died May 16, 1907, mourned not only by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances, but by those who knew him as a real public benefactor, an honest and upright public official and a man in every sense that the word implies .

In September, 1884, Mr. Harriman was united in marriage with Miss Matilda Waterhouse, who was born in Waupaca county, Wisconsin, daughter of B. B. and Sarah (McKerlie) Waterhouse, old settlers of Waupaca county. To this union there were born the following children: Sarah Celia, who married Percy H. Meyers, an expert accountant, of Milwaukee; and Eleanor May, Joseph, Matilda and Francis, all at home .

ENGELBERT SCHUELLER, commissioner of the city of Appleton, and for years a well-known newspaper man and musician of this city, was born in Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, January 30, 1856, a son of Lawrence and Katherine (Mueller) Schueller. The parents of Mr. Schueller, who were natives of Germany, came to the United States as young people and were married in Wisconsin. Lawrence Schueller came to Ozaukee county in 1846, and his life was spent there in agricultural pursuits, his death occurring in 1905, while his widow survived him two years. They were the parents of twelve children, of whom eleven grew to maturity and ten are still alive. Engelbert Schueller received a public school education and also studied at home, and at the age of eighteen years he began to teach. About this time he also started to study music, and entered St. Francis Normal School, from which he was graduated in 1878. From that year until 1881 he taught school in Brooklyn, New York, and from 1881 until 1896 was at St. Joseph's School in Appleton, being organist in the church during the same period. Since that time he has been organist at St. Mary's Church. For a number of years he did editorial work and was manager of the Appleton Wecker und Samstags Bote, and in 1911 he was elected commissioner of Appleton, the first time the city has had that form of government. Mr. Schueller and his family attend St. Mary's and St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and in political matters he is Democratic. Mr. Schueller is the owner of a fine farm in Calumet county. On May 9, 1882, he was married to Helene Hopfensperger, of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, daughter of John Hopfensperger, who came to America about 1846, locating in Calumet county, and later removed to Outagamie county, where he was engaged in butchering. He had fourteen children, of whom seven survive. Mr. and Mrs. Schueller have had the following children: Jennie, who married Joseph Guentert, a resident of Appleton; Adelaide and Louise, at home; Aloysius, studying at Insbruck, Germany; Mary, Lawrence, Cecile and Henry, all at home; and Joseph, who died at the age of seven years .

JOSEPH KOFFEND, one of the representative business men of Appleton, Wisconsin, who for more than thirty years has been interested in real estate and insurance here, was born at Leibitsch, Austria, Germany, May 17, 1846, a son of John and Elizabeth (Sonderleiter) Koffend, natives of the same place, where John Koffend was born March 19, 1819, and where his first wife, whom he had married in 1841, died in 1850, having been the mother of three children, of whom Joseph survives. John Koffend was married (second) to Anna Fisher, a native of Germany, who bore him four children, of whom George, who resides at Minneapolis, and Mrs. Barbara Fischer, a resident of Appleton survive. In 1855 they emigrated to America, locating at Appleton in September of that year. Mr. Koffend first followed his trade of blacksmith in an axe factory, and later he established a business of his own, conducting it until 1878, when he retired, and his death occurred in 1890, his wife having passed away twenty years before. Mr. Koffend was one of the early settlers of Outagamie County, and did his share to advance its interests in every way. Joseph Koffend was principally educated in the school of hard work, although he did get somewhat of a literary training, but most of his time was spent in farm work or at whatever presented itself to occupy him until he was seventeen years old. At that time he apprenticed himself to the tinsmith's trade, learning every branch of the business, and after three years entered the employ of Alfred Galpin, Sr., with whom he was working in 1876 at the time of his election to the office of city treasurer, a position which he held for seven years. In 1880 he began to be interested in the insurance business, and between that year and 1886 he added real estate to his line, but eventually turned that over to F. E. Harriman. In 1889 he formed a partnership with A. L. Smith, who handled both real estate and insurance, and Mr. Koffend has continued to conduct the insurance end of the business to the present time, handling a general line of fire insurance and bonding all lines of insurance. He has been a member of the school board and the board of education for the past twenty-four years, and is a stanch Democrat in politics. Since 1869 he has been connected with the Odd Fellows, having passed through all the chairs, and he is a consistent member of the Congregational Church. Mr. Koffend was one of the original stockholders of the Appleton Street Railway, the first line of its kind in the United States .

Mr. Koffend was married September 7, 1875, to Miss Julia Weinfeld, a native of Austria and daughter of Jacob Weinfeld, for some time a merchant of Appleton, and later of Milwaukee. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Koffend, namely: Rudolph, who is deceased; Joseph, Jr., a graduate of the law department of the State University, and now an attorney of Appleton; and Emma, Littie and Elsie, residing at home .

HENRY C. COURT. The farmers of Outagamie county are among the most progressive in the State, for this part of it is especially fertile and adapted to agricultural purposes. One of those who have proven the profit to be had from the cultivation of the soil is Henry C. Court, a well-known farmer of Grand Chute township, who was born on the farm which he now operates, August 27, 1867, a son of Andrew and Marie Court, natives of Prussia and Mecklenburg, Germany, respectively. Andrew Court came to the United States about 1864, and for one year resided in New York, then removing to Outagamie county, and settling on the farm which is now operated by his son, Henry C. Here he resided until 1901, and then retired from active life and went to live with his son Emil, a resident of Appleton who is employed as shipping clerk in the Sulphite Paper Mill. Another brother, Herman, is operator for the St. Paul Railroad, at Green Bay. Henry C. Court attended the public schools of Greenville township, and at the age of eighteen years commenced working as a farm hand among the farmers of his locality, continuing to act in this capacity until his marriage, when he bought the old family homestead of 110 acres. Here he has carried on general farming and stock raising, and has made numerous improvements and installed new innovations in the way of equipment and machinery, and has one of the best farms in this part of the township. On January 2, 1895, Mr. Court was married to Lizzie Steinacher, who was born in Kaukauna, Wisconsin, December 25, 1877, daughter of Nicholas and Lizzie Steinacher, natives of Germany who came to the United States about 1864 and after some years spent in Kaukauna, rented a farm near Menasha, Wisconsin. They then came to Grand Chute township and rented a farm, and after carrying on operations on this and on another farm which Mr. Steinacher bought later, sold out and moved to Appleton, where both Mr. and Mrs. Steinacher are now living. They had a family of seven children, as follows: Mrs. Court; William, who lives in Appleton; Tillie, the wife of Emil Schwahn, a member of Fire Department Company No. 3, Appleton; Rosie, the wife of Henry Haferbecker, of Appleton; Fred, who is a resident of Grand Chute township, where he carries on farming; Edward, also a farmer of this township; and Anna, the wife of Robert Schmiege, a mail carrier of Appleton .

Mr. and. Mrs. Court have had three children: Nichie, born March 20, 1891; Freddie, born September 18, 1898; and Henry, born February 25, 1906. Mr. Court's political convictions are those of the Republican party. He and Mrs. Court are faithful members of the Appleton Lutheran Church .

ALBERT KRUEGER. The Germans have been the leading settlers in a considerable portion of Outagamie county, bringing with them those important characteristics of their nation, industry and thrift, and the farms owned by them show the results of their hard work and prudent management. Albert Krueger, who owns an excellent farm in Grand Chute township, was born in Germany, July 2, 1858, a son of Ferdinand and Johanah (Knuth) Krueger, the former born in Germany, in June, 1824, and the latter July 17, 1830. Ferdinand Krueger was a shepherd in his native country and came to America in 1868, locating in Milwaukee, from whence, three years later, he came to Grand Chute township and purchased a farm, on which he continued to live until within a few years of his death. He died at the home of his son, Albert, in 1891, and his widow still makes her home here. They were the parents of five children, namely: William, a farmer of Dupont, Waupaca county; Frederick, who resides on a farm adjoining that of his brother William; Charles, living in Marion, Wisconsin, where he is serving as marshal; Bertha, the wife of Charles Krueger, a farmer of Templeton, Wisconsin; and Albert. Albert Krueger began his education in Germany, and finished it in the schools of Milwaukee, and resided on his father's farm until he was twenty-five years old, at which time he purchased the property which he now owns. This was a tract of sixty acres, only partly improved, and he has since added twenty-eight acres more and put the entire tract under cultivation, carrying on general farming and stock raising. He is also the owner of a five-acre tract of timber land located three miles north of the home property. On November 10, 1886, Mr. Krueger was married to Ernestina Buchholtz, who was born in Grand Chute township, July 3, 1868, daughter of Charles and Dorothy (Miller) Buchholtz, who were born in Mecklenburg, Germany, August 12, 1832, and August 1, 1837, respectively, and came to America in 1865, first locating on a farm in Greenville township, Outagamie county. Later Mr. Buchholtz carried on operations on a Grand Chute township farm for some years, but eventually returned to Greenville township, where he spent the balance of his life, dying May 12, 1899, while his widow now resides in Appleton. They were the parents of ten children, of whom nine are now living: Doretta, who is deceased; Louisa, the wife of Charles Roehl, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Fred, who resides with his mother; Sophia, the wife of Henry Sedo, a Black Creek township farmer; Mrs. Krueger; Henry, who owns a farm adjoining that of Mr. Kreuger; Charles, living on the old Buchholtz homestead in Greenville township; Anna and Lovina, single, who reside with their mother; and August, a carpenter of Appleton. Mr. and Mrs. Krueger have had the following children: Helena, born June 17, 1888, who is the wife of Nicholas Arent, of Dale, Wisconsin; Charles, born September 8, 1891; Elsie, May 17, 1893; Arthur, May 24, 1895; Otto, May 1, 1897; Albert, August 8, 1899; Emery, September 22, 1901; Harold, August 20, 1903; Clara, January 7, 1907; and Harvey, March 18, 1910. Mr. Krueger takes an independent stand in political matters, although he has Republican tendencies. He and his wife are consistent members of St. John's Evangelical Church, at Appleton .

JOHN STEP HEENAN, general farmer, stockraiser and dairyman of Grand Chute township, is operating 250 acres of fine farming land, on which he was born December 25, 1859, a son of John and Mary (Conway) Heenan, natives of Ireland. John Heenan was born in County Tipperary and his wife in County Clare, and they were married in Appleton, Wisconsin, removing to the Grand Chute township farm the day after the ceremony. At this time the farm and the surrounding country were a vast wilderness, not even a wagon road leading through, but Mr. Heenan built himself a little home, and started in to clear the brush and timber from the land and to get it ready for the first crop. After this had been accomplished, the property was rapidly cultivated, each year finding further improvements, and when he deeded the land to his son in about 1895, it was one of the best farms in this section of the township. Mr. Heenan died on this property in 1903, his wife having passed away in 1885. They were the parents of six children: Margaret, deceased; John Stephen; Bridget, wife of James Garvey, a resident of Freedom township; James, and two who died in infancy. John Stephen Heenan attended the district schools of Grand Chute township, and was brought up on the home farm, which he has never left. As soon as he was old enough he began to do his share of the clearing and cultivating, and he was given charge of the property several years before it was deeded to him. He now has 250 acres under cultivation, devoted to general farming, and he makes dairying a specialty, disposing of his milk to the cheese factories of this vicinity. He is a member of the Roman Catholic Church at Appleton, and takes an independent stand in politics. On January 30, 1894, Mr. Heenan was married to Miss Katherine Garvey, who was born in Freedom township, April 30, 1865, daughter of Patrick and Phoebe (Carney) Garvey. Patrick Garvey was born in County Westmeade, Ireland, and his wife in County Queens, and they were married in 1850 in New York, whence Mr. Garvey had come in 1848. He worked on public works in New York City for about five years, and then went to Hungry Hollow, Ohio, where he was engaged in railroad construction for about four years, at the end of which time he came to Freedom township and bought a farm. Mr. Garvey became one of the prosperous citizens of his township, and served in various offices. His death occurred in 1887, his widow surviving him until 1904. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom five are now living: Mary, a sister in the convent at Milwaukee; Mrs. Heenan; Rose, the wife of Francis J. Vanlaanan, of Green Bay; Elizabeth, the wife of Gerhart Vandelocht, of Appleton; and Patrick, a farmer of Freedom township. Mr. and Mrs. Heenan have had seven children, born as follows: John Stephen, Jr., April 25, 1895; Patrick James, April 24, 1897; Mary Martha, October 30, 1898; Phoebe Ann, January 8, 1900; James Sylvester, May 3, 1901; Ruth Magdalene, November 4, 1902; and Francis Joseph, November 24, 1905 .

JOHN BEEMSTER, a well-known business citizen of Grand Chute township, whose energies are devoted to cheesemaking, is the owner of several factories in this county, as well as a farm of seventy-five acres. Mr. Beemster was born May 16, 1870, in Holland, a son of Peter and Katie (Laakerman) Beemster, natives of that country. Peter Beemster was born January 24, 1838, and came to America in 1880, settling first in Ohio, where for some years he followed the trade of carpenter in Cleveland, and then removed to Green Bay, Wisconsin, and later to Styles, Oconto Falls and Neenah, and from the latter place to Chicago, where he now resides. Mr. and Mrs. Beemster had eight children, of whom John is the third in order of birth. He secured the early part of his educational training in his native country, and later attended school in Cleveland, Ohio, and Green Bay, Wisconsin, and after finishing his education started to work as a farm hand for several years. His first experience as a cheesemaker was at Rockland, near DePere, Brown county, where after about thirteen years he built and operated a factory. In March, 1908, Mr. Beemster came to Grand Chute township, buying his present business, which includes one-eighth of an acre of ground, and he has equipped his factory with machinery and accessories for making every kind of cheese in demand in this country. He also owns a farm of seventy-five acres near Pound, Wisconsin, and a cheese factory near that point, which he has rented out. He devotes most of his time to his Grand Chute factory, and sells his product in the Appleton markets. His home is at this factory. On May 18, 1897, Mr. Beemster was married to Nellie Biersteker, who was born in the Netherlands, April 7, 1865, daughter of Edward and Mary (Langdyke) Biersteker, natives of that place, where the father was born October 16, 1832, and the mother September 12, 1831. They came to America in 1885, locating in Marinette, Wisconsin, where they rented a home, but later removed to Green Bay, and from there went to DePere, where Mr. Biersteker died May 13, 1908, his wife having passed away May 12, 1894. Mrs. Beemster was the fourth of her parents' seven children. Mr. and Mrs. Beemster have had one child: Mary, born December 22, 1900. The family is connected with the Greenville Roman Catholic Church, and Mr. Beemster belongs to the Catholic Order of Foresters. He is independent in his political views .

LOUIS HOH, who owns a general stock and dairy farm of 112 acres, located in Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, has been a resident of this section all of his life, having been born on the farm which he now operates, February 2, 1877, a son of John and Katharine (Rinamann) Hoh. John Hoh was born in Germany, April 27, 1837, and came to America at the age of five years, and was reared in Milwaukee, from whence his parents moved to Grand Chute township. Here Mr. Hoh settled down to make improvements, and after clearing and cultivating it engaged in agricultural pursuits until his retirement in 1902, at which time he removed to Appleton, and now resides on State street. He and his wife had a family of seven children, namely: Daniel, a retired citizen of College avenue, Appleton; Anna, the wife of Fred Zachow, a carpenter of Appleton; John, residing in Appleton; Louis; Minnie, who married Andrew Gehring, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Helen, who is single and residing with her parents; and Katharine, who married Harry Howe .

Louis Hoh secured his education in the Greenville district schools, and was married September 27, 1902, to Hattie Jennerjohn, who was born in Greenville township, October 30, 1883, daughter of Henry and Sophia (Bushman) Jennerjohn, natives of Germany, who now reside in Greenville township. Mr. Hoh has never left the homestead farm. He worked with his father after leaving school and continued to remain there after attaining his majority, and in 1902 when John Hoh retired, he took charge and operates a general stock and dairy farm. Mr. Hoh is a member of the Greenville Lutheran Church, and in political matters is independent. He and his wife have had three children: Wilbert, born in 1903; Leland, born in 1906; and Reuben, born in 1908 .

CHARLES HOMER GILLETT, assistant city engineer of Appleton, Wisconsin, was born at Randolph, Portage county, Ohio, July 30, 1853, a son of Henry Davis and Martha Augusta (Shepard) Gillett. The family of Gillett is of French Huguenot descent, the name being formerly spelled Gillet, meaning Julia, fem. of Julius. Mr. Gillett's branch of the family left France for Scotland, and some thirty years later, about 1600, went to, Southern England, from whence, May 30, 1630, the progenitors, Nathan and Jonathan, came to America. The latter's sixth son, Jeremiah, had a son Abraham, whose son, Noah, of Farmington, Conn., was the father of Captain Obediah, of Avon, Conn., the great grandfather of Charles H. Gillett. Noah, Jr., an older brother of Obediah, was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Obediah's first son was Alva, who was the father of Henry Davis Gillett. The latter died in September 3, 1856, at Springport, Michigan, while visiting with his brother, Amon. Mrs. Gillett married Captain Enos Frank Drummond, a sea captain and steamboat man, operating the steamer "Wolf" between New London and Oshkosh during the Civil War. She came to Wisconsin in 1860, locating at New London, where Captain Drummond died in 1863, and in 1867 Mrs. Gillett (Drummond) came to Appleton, where she has resided ever since. Mrs. Gillett had two sons by her first marriage: Charles Homer and Henry Wells, the latter born September 18, 1856, who is now located in Freedom, Portage county, Ohio. Charles Homer Gillett received a common school education, and as a youth took up civil engineering and surveying as a life occupation. He worked in the woods for some years as cruiser and estimator of timber and assisted in surveying the lake shore line from Kaukauna to Appleton, was a member of the government river surveying party, was assistant city surveyor and deputy county surveyor under John Stephens, and in 1876 served as city engineer. From 1876 until 1880 Mr. Gillett was in the employ of the Lake Shore Railroad, and from 1880 until 1890 served as city engineer, a position which he also held from 1896 to 1900. He has acted in this capacity several times since, and is now holding the position of assistant city engineer, also the office of county surveyor since 1903 .

Mr. Gillett was married April 29, 1897, to Augusta Drephal, of Cicero, Wisconsin, daughter of Fred Drephal, and three children have been born to this union, namely: Henry F., September 2, 1898; Esther May, May 6, 1902; and the baby, Ruth Augusta, April 24, 1911. Mr. Gillett is an independent voter, and is fraternally connected with the Modern Woodmen and the E. F. U .

CHARLES S. VINAL, city engineer of Appleton, Wisconsin, who has been engaged in civil engineering since his fourteenth year, was born in Iowa, September 10, 1858, a son of Henry L. and Maria W. (Reed) Vinal, natives of Massachusetts, who went to Iowa at an early date and later returned to Massachusetts, removing in 1900 to Virginia, where Mr. Vinal died in 1907. Mrs. Vinal, who is still living there, has been the mother of three daughters and two sons, all of whom are still living. The Vinal family is one of the old New England ones, tracing its ancestry back to 1635, when Ann Vinal and her sons, Charles and Stephen, came to the American Colonies. Charles H. Vinal received his early education in Massachusetts, and was given the advantages of attendance at high school and Bryant & Stratton's Business College, at which latter place he studied civil engineering, his maternal grandfather having followed that profession. He came to Wisconsin in 1879, and for eleven years was locating engineer with the Milwaukee, Lake Shore & Western Railroad. In 1885 he settled in Appleton, and during 1890 was elected city engineer of that city, a position he has held for eleven years since that time, the intervening years being spent in a successful contracting business. He is now serving as city engineer .

In 1882 Mr. Vinal was united in marriage with Ida M. Fernald, of Massachusetts, daughter of B. N. and Henrietta (Simpson) Fernald, a New England family, and to this union there has been born one daughter, Velma H., a graduate of the University of Wisconsin, and a successful teacher. Mr. Vinal is a member of the Wisconsin Engineering Society, Odd Fellows and Encampment, the Knights of Pythias and the Elks, in all of which he is extremely popular .

FRANK E. CLARK, a prominent member of the Outagamie county bar, who is now engaged in an extensive law practice in the city of Appleton, was born November 12, 1860, in Wausau, Wisconsin, a son of Alban and Jane A. (Calkins) Clark, natives of New York. Alban Clark, who was a schoolteacher in his native state, came west to Illinois and followed his profession for a time, and in 1852 came to Wisconsin, where for one year he was principal of the Wausau schools. He then engaged in the lumber business, but later engaged in farming, and he is now living a retired life at Princeton, Green Lake county. In 1858 he was married to Jane A. Calkins, who came from New York to Wausau, Wisconsin, with her parents in 1847, and they had a family of eight children, of whom two are now deceased. The elder Mr. Clark is a Republican in politics, has served as county clerk, and for twelve years has been county surveyor. Frank E. Clark's early education was secured in the schools of Princeton, and he taught school until going to Valparaiso, Indiana, where he attended the university and graduated from the law department in 1888. He started to practice at Princeton, where he remained until 1905, and in that year came to Appleton, which has been his field of practice to the present time. Mr. Clark has always been an ardent Republican, and in 1895 he was sent to the General Assembly. Fraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Elks, and he also holds membership in the Sons of Veterans, his grandfather having served for four years during the Civil War. When he was but twenty-one years of age Mr. Clark served as county surveyor, but decided upon the law as a profession, and the success that he has attained in this line has shown his choice to have been a wise one. Mr. and Mrs. Clark are consistent members of the Congregational Church .

On September 23, 1890, Mr. Clark was married to Miss Fannie B. Hamer, of Princeton, Wisconsin, the estimable daughter of George T. and Emma J. (Littlechild) Hamer. They have had no children .

FRANK I. PHILLIPS, a well-known citizen of Appleton, Wisconsin, has been superintendent of the Appleton Woolen Mills since 1894, and has been connected with this large concern since its incorporation here nearly thirty years ago. He was born in February, 1856, in Springville, New York, a son of William and Louisa (Pomerter) Phillips, natives of New York, the latter of whom is now deceased. William Phillips, who has been in the tanning and leather business all of his life, is now a resident of Otto, New York. Frank I. Phillips was the third of his parents' four children, and he received a somewhat limited common school education, as he entered the woolen mills at Otto, New York, when he was only ten years of age, beginning to gain experience that was to prove of great value to him in the years to follow. He was eighteen years old when he came west to Wisconsin, first locating at Baraboo, Sauk county, where he remained three years, and then at Montello, where he was employed four years. When the Appleton Woolen Mills established their factory here, Mr. Phillips entered their employ, and he worked his way up from boss weaver, the position which he held when he first joined the company, to assistant superintendent, and later, in 1894, to superintendent, a position which he has held to the present time. Mr. Phillips is an expert in his line, as he has followed this occupation all of his life, and is capable of handling any and every department in the big mills. He is a Republican in his political views, while his fraternal connections have been with the Odd Fellows, which society he joined as a young man.

Mr. Phillips was married in 1878 to Izola Sheldon, of Montello, Wisconsin, daughter of Simon and Caroline Sheldon, and one daughter has been born to this union: Grace, who married Edward Boland, of Appleton .

WILLIAM W. JOHNSON, superintendent of the Kimberly & Clark Paper Mill at Kimberly, Wisconsin, and one of the best-known men in his line in this part of Outagamie county, was born at Chillicothe, Ohio, November 21, 1865, a son of Albert and Elizabeth Johnson, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Pennsylvania. Mr. Johnson's father, who was a contractor and mill builder, died in Ohio, as did his wife. They were the parents of two daughters and six sons, William W. being the youngest in the family. He obtained a public school education in Ohio, and his first employment was in the paper mills of Ingham & Company at Chillicothe, Ohio, where he remained until 1889. In that year he came to Wisconsin, locating at Neenah, where he entered the employ of the Kimberly & Clark Company as a machine operator. His faithfulness to duty, his skill as a mechanic, and his thorough knowledge of the business made him the logical choice when a vacancy came, and in 1900 he was advanced to the superintendency of the Vulcan Mills, a position which he held until the Kimberly Mills were erected, at which time he was transferred to these large factories. He has proved himself a capable man for the position he holds, and is popular alike with owners and employes. In 1893 Mr. Johnson was married to Clara M. Stengel, of Neenah, Wisconsin, and they have had a family of three daughters and two sons. Mr. Johnson's fraternal connections are with the lodge and chapter of the Masonic fraternity .

D. M. AND A. GEENEN. One of the most successful business establishments operated and owned by women in the United States is that of the Misses D. M. and A. Geenen, who are conducting a large retail dry goods business in Appleton, Wisconsin. This business was established in 1896 by the Misses Geenan, in company with Mr. Koch and William Smith, both of whose interests have been purchased by the ladies, who now carry on the business by themselves. The business first started in the old Morey building, but as the venture proved successful and steadily grew, more space was needed, and the operations now cover three store buildings, each 22x135 feet. A complete line of dry goods is carried, and the proprietresses have proved that they are not only capable in a business way, but that they can introduce new features into their business, learning the public's wishes and cultivating its tastes for new innovations .

The Misses Geenen are the daughters of John Geenen, who came to the United States in 1856. He resided in the State of Illinois for about two years and then located with his brother-in-law, Mr. Evert Sanders, on the Fox River, at the present site of South Kaukauna, where they took up wild land and brought it under cultivation .

John Geenen had a family of eight children, of whom three are deceased, the survivors being: Mrs. Wm. Brill, living on a farm in Buchanan township; William, a florist at Kimberly; and Dina, Minnie and Anna, of Appleton .

Evert Sanders was born in Holland in 1819, and died in October, 1903. He came to the United States in 1858 and located with John Geenen on the Fox River. He married Henrietta Geenen, a sister of John Geenen, and they had no children. He was a prominent figure in politics during his day, being town clerk and justice of the peace for many years .

SANFORD D. NEWELL, proprietor of the Seymour Electric Light and Power Company, of Seymour, Wisconsin, and a public-spirited citizen who has been closely identified with the progress and development of Seymour during the past ten years, was born March 15, 1856, in Steuben county, New York, a son of Sanford and Mary (Kinney) Newell. Sanford Newell, the father, was born in Boone county, New York, and was but three years old when he accompanied his parents to Steuben county in 1825. His life was spent in agricultural pursuits and his death occurred in 1902, his wife having passed away in 1861, when Sanford D. was still a small boy. Their children were: John, who is residing in South Dakota; Sanford D.; Myron, who is residing in California, and Mary, who married Willard H. Wood, of Alabama .

Sanford D. Newell secured his education in the district school of Steuben county, New York, and his eighteenth year found him working as an engineer. Later he became an electrician and came west to Augusta, Wisconsin, where he lived until 1902, and this year he came to Seymour and purchased the electric light plant. The plant power, which is now 1,000 lights, has tripled in capacity since Mr. Newell has taken over the management and during the entire time that he has had charge, it has never failed to start on time. Mr. Newell, who is an exceptionally skilled mechanic, possessed of much executive ability, is giving the city excellent service. It has always been his aim to furnish his adopted community with the utmost power and light which the plant is able to supply. He is a member of Seymour Lodge of Odd Fellows. Mr. Newell was married in 1893 to Mary H. Ball, who was born in Eau Claire county, Wisconsin, daughter of John L. and Carolyn (Clark) Ball. Mr. and Mrs. Newell are the parents of children, as follows: Carolyn M., John S. and Charles D.

WILLIAM BAKER, who has been a resident of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, for more than forty years, and is now living retired in the city of Seymour after a long period spent in agricultural pursuits in Seymour township, was born in Richfield, Washington county, Wisconsin, January 12, 1852, and is a son of Charles and Fredericka (Sehbrecht) Baker, natives of the Province of Brunswick, Germany. The parents of Mr. Baker were married in Germany, where Charles Baker followed farming until coming to the United States in 1849 with his wife and six children, the latter being: August, Henry, Charles, Louisa, Caroline, and Dorothea, of whom August is now deceased. Three children, William, Lewis and Anna, were born in the United States. Charles Baker located in Richfield, Washington county, Wisconsin, but some time later removed to Germantown, where he purchased a farm and followed agricultural pursuits until his death, January 13, 1890, at the age of eighty-five years, his widow passing away in 1902, when she had reached the same age .

William Baker received his education in the district schools, and his youth was spent much the same as that of other farmers' boys of his day, he being reared to the life of an agriculturist. As soon as he was able he was put to work on the home farm, and he discharged his duties there until he had reached the age of eighteen years, when he decided to start to work on his own account, and subsequently left home and came to Seymour. During the winter of 1869-70 he worked at the ashery, but during the following summer he found employment on a farm in Osborne township, on which he remained several years. His next employment was as a carpenter, but eventually he located on an eighty-acre farm situated three and one-half miles north of Seymour, in Seymour township, where he erected his own farm buildings and commenced to operate and cultivate his land. After many years of hard work he decided that he had earned a rest, and, selling his farm in Seymour township, retired to Seymour, where he has a handsome residence. Mr. Baker is a Republican in politics, but he has never aspired to office. His religious connection is with the German Evangelical Church .

In June, 1886, Mr. Baker was married to Miss Frana Green, who was born in Ontario, Canada, March 22, 1852, daughter of Balthaser and Catherine (Schmidt) Green, the former a native of Hesse Darmstadt and the latter of Elsass Lorraine, Germany. They were married in Canada, whence Mr. Green had come when twenty-four years old, Mrs. Green having accompanied her parents to that country when twelve years old. Their marriage took place November 8, 1836, and they were engaged in farming in Canada until 1861, at which time they came to the United States and settled at Greenville, Outagamie county, but in 1884 they retired and settled in Seymour. Here Mr. Green died in 1894, aged ninety-two years, his wife having passed away the year previous, in her seventy-second year. Their children were: Mary, who was born November 19, 1838; Catherine, born November 11, 1839; John, born October 1, 1841, died April 27, 1911; Louis, born February 28, 1843, and died at the age of sixteen years; Moses, born April 25, 1845, and died at the age of nineteen years in a hospital, while a member of a Wisconsin regiment during the Civil War; Conrad, born December 8, 1847; Paul, born January 18, 1850; Mrs. Baker; Anna, born May 16, 1854; Lydia, born July 10, 1856; Henry, born June 13, 1860; and Levi, born November 29, 1862 .

Mr. and Mrs. Baker have had two children, namely: Lenora, born April 17, 1887, and Franklin, born April 4, 1890, both residing at home .

WILLIAM FORSTNER was born in Pomerania, Germany, January 24, 1841, a son of August and Caroline (Uecke) Forstner, natives of the Fatherland, where the father died in 1864, aged fifty-six years, and the mother in 1900 when eighty-three years old. They had a family of eleven children, as follows: August, who is now a resident of Oklahoma; Minnie, who died in Wisconsin; William; Herman, who died in Wisconsin; Gottlieb, who died in Germany; Augusta, Fred, and Caroline, and three children who died in Germany .

William Forstner secured his education in the schools of his native country, and in his youth learned the carpenter trade, which he followed in Germany until 1870, in which year he came to the United States. Locating at Freedom, Wisconsin, Mr. Forstner made a home for his family, and continued to reside at that point for twenty-five years, at the end of which time he removed to Seymour, and this city has been his home to the present time. For a long period he was engaged in farming and following the trade of carpenter, but he is now living retired in his handsome brick house in Seymour. He has earned a competence for himself and family, and can look back over a useful and well-spent life. Although he has never aspired to political preferment, he takes an active interest in the important public issues of the day, and may always be depended upon to cast his influence in behalf of the measures which make for advancement along industrial and educational lines. He has been for many years identified with church work, holding membership in the Lutheran Church of Seymour .

In 1865 Mr. Forstner was married in Germany to Miss Caroline Walchlager, who was born in that country March 10, 1845, daughter of John and Caroline (Leverenz) Walchlager, the former of whom died in 1863, aged sixty-three years, and the latter in 1904, aged seventy-two. Eleven children were born to the parents of Mrs. Forstner, namely: August, William, Minnie, Caroline, Bertha, Augusta, Tenna, Albert, Malinda, Richard and Max, of whom Caroline, Bertha and Max are living .

Mr. and Mrs. Forstner have had the following children: Julius, born October 1, 1865, now deceased; Bertha, born March 9, 1867; Anna, deceased; Richard, born May 5, 1871; Charles, born August 1, 1873; William, deceased; Ella, born June 12, 1878; Paul, born September 16, 1880; Otta, born February 5, 1883; Lillian, born August 22, 1884; Irwin, born January 30, 1887; and Arnold, born September 16, 1888. The first three children named were born in Germany, the rest in the United States .

ALFRED P. HOLZ, M. D., a well-known physician and surgeon of Seymour, Wisconsin, who for the past thirteen years has been conducting the Seymour Hospital, was born August 6, 1873, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, a son of Louis and Johanna (Odenbrett) Holz, and a grandson of Jacob and Magdalina Holz. Jacob Holz was in early life a manufacturer of pottery and earthenware in Wurttemburg, Germany, but during the last fifty years of his life he served as a police official. He had a family of nine children, namely: Louis, the father of Dr. Alfred P.; Jacob, who died in Germany; Fred, who died in Milwaukee; John and Christ, who are now living in Milwaukee; Elizabeth, who married Fred Meyers and lives in Switzerland; Anna, who married a Mr. G. Ulrich, of Milwaukee; Lena, who lives in the Fatherland; and Maria, who died at the age of eighteen years in Germany .

Louis Holz, the father of Dr. Holz, was born in Wurttemburg, Germany, June 1, 1845, and on his twenty-first birthday left his native country for the United States. Being a millwright by trade, he soon secured employment in the mills of Milwaukee, and was the first to install the roller for patent process flour in the State for his employer. Mr. Holz still lives, although he is now retired from active pursuits, and makes his home in Seymour. He was married June 6, 1869, to Johanna Odenbrett, who was born January 14, 1852, daughter of John and Louisa (Lienzeman) Odenbrett, and granddaughter of Philip Odenbrett and Johan and Johanna Lienzeman. The parents of Mrs. Holz came to the United States from Germany in 1848 and settled in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where their seven children were born, namely: Johanna; Louis (I.), who is deceased; Louis (II.), also deceased; Edward and Louisa, deceased; Maria, who resides at Elm Grove; and William, deceased .

Alfred P. Holz secured his education in the graded schools of Milwaukee, the high school at Seymour and the Wisconsin College of Physicians and Surgeons, from which latter institution he was graduated with the class of 1898. He immediately located at Seymour, where he engaged in a general practice for six years and then opened the Seymour Hospital, of which he has been the proprietor to the present time. The hospital is devoted to cases of a surgical nature only .

Dr. Holz was married in 1906 to Minnie Droeger, daughter of George F. Droeger, of Seymour, and to this union there have been born two children, namely: Dorothea and Alfred .

PAUL GABLOWSKY, one of the substantial and progressive business men of Seymour, Wisconsin, and proprietor of the Seymour Woodenware Company, was born March 17, 1857, at Two Rivers, Wisconsin, and is a son of William and Marie (Moser) Gablowsky, the former a native of Pomerania, Prussia, and the latter of Holstein, in the northern part of Germany. The parents of Mr. Gablowsky came to the United States in the early '50s and settled at Two Rivers, Wisconsin, where Mr. Gablowsky followed the trade of carpenter until removing to Algoma, Wisconsin, where his death occurred in 1890. Of the six children born to him and his wife, Paul was the oldest. He secured his early education in the schools of Algoma, he having been a mere lad when the family settled at that place, and in his youth he learned the trade of carpenter from his father. This he followed at Algoma until reaching the age of twenty-two years, when he decided to strike out for himself, and subsequently built a cheese box factory, which he managed for four or five years under the name of Gablowsky & Company. In addition to this work he did contracting and building, constructing many of the prominent buildings of Algoma, the last of which was the St. Paul's Lutheran Church of that city, built in 1896. The last two years of his residence at Algoma he served as alderman of the First Ward; he was re-elected to the office for the second term, but before this term expired he removed with his family to Seymour, Wisconsin, where he sought a larger field for his activities. He and Mr. Michelstetter leased the Seymour Manufacturing Plant, calling it the Seymour Woodenware Co. This new firm engages in the manufacture of candy pails, which proved to be a great success .

In 1901 this plant was totally destroyed by fire, the firm thereby sustaining a heavy loss. Mr. Gablowsky then purchased the half interest of Mr. Michelstetter and began the manufacture of cheese boxes, the business gradually increasing from year to year. The year of 1910 the capacity ran as high as 110,000 cheese boxes during the cheese making season. Besides manufacturing cheese boxes he also manufactures egg cases and butter tubs as a side line .

In 1882 Mr. Gablowsky was married to Bertha Perlewitz, daughter of Dr. and Mrs. H. C. F. Perlewitz, of Oshkosh, Wisconsin. At the age of seventeen she removed to Algoma with her parents. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Paul Gablowsky. Mr. Gablowsky is independent in his political views and is now before the public for the office of alderman during the coming election .

ANTHONY ELLENBECKER, who is engaged in farming on a property near Appleton, in Center township, Outagamie county, has resided on this property all of his life. He was born here July 7, 1872, a son of Nicholas Ellenbecker, a native of Germany, who came to the United States during the early '60s, when but sixteen years old, and settled in the town of Greenville, on the farm of an uncle. After about ten years here he had accumulated enough to purchase a farm of his own, and subsequently purchased the Center township property. At this time he was married to Anna Tock, whom he had known in Germany, from which country she came in 1866, her family first settling in Appleton and then moving on to Center township. They had seven children, of whom two are now deceased. Anthony Ellenbecker was the oldest of the children of his parents, and all the time that he could spare from the district school he was compelled to give to the work of the farm, as it was necessary that he should assist his father in the support of the growing family. Later he spent three years in the Sisters' school at Mackville, but after completing this term returned to the home farm and took up his duties again. In 1906 his parents removed to Appleton, and Mr. Ellenbecker then rented the homestead from them and has continued to conduct it to the present time. General farming and dairying operations have demanded all of his attention, and he has never aspired to public office, although a stanch supporter of the principles of the Democratic party .

On April 12, 1910, Mr. Ellenbecker was married to Mamie Garvey, daughter of James P. and Bridget Garvey, of Freedom township. Mrs. Ellenbecker was formerly a schoolteacher of District No. 4, Center township. She and Mr. Ellenbecker are members of St. Edward's Catholic Church, at Mackville .

REVEREND JOHN E. ZERBACH, pastor of St. Edward's Church, was born October 28, 1867, in Germany, where he received his education and made his studies with the exception of his final theological studies, which he completed in the Jesuit College of St. Boniface, being an integral part of the University of Manitoba, Canada. Having taught for two years mathematics, drawing and music in this college, Father Zerbach assisted in the Immaculate Conception Church of the City of Winnipeg and else for about one year, and then began his own pastorate of St. Joseph's Church and its missions, including Regina, in Saskatchewan, for nearly ten years, where he promoted the upbuilding of this section by immigration and by the building of churches and schools. His health giving way in the severe climate of Saskatchewan, he spent one summer in Germany recuperating and then, in October, 1904, came to the diocese of Green Bay, where, since September, 1905, he has been the rector of St. Edward's Church. Under his guidance the Church of St. Edward has been renovated and refurnished with an expenditure of about $7,000, so that it is now one of the finest interiorly furnished and finished churches of the country about. In the year 1907, a new priest's house, an imposing brick building, was erected at a cost of about $5,000. The finances of this little parish are in perfect condition, there being no liabilities of any kind. The school, led by three Franciscan Sisters, and superintended by Father Zerbach, is working under the eight-grade system, and has been turning out successful candidates for High school every year. It is the aim of Rev. Father Zerbach to erect within a short time a new building for school purposes .

CHARLES F. MAYLAHN, who devotes his activities to farming in Center township, where he owns a magnificent farm of 110 acres, is a native of Germany and a son of Ludwig Maylahn. Ludwig Maylahn came from Germany with his wife and seven children and located at Green Bay, Wisconsin, in 1872, two years later going to Menominee Falls, where he spent a like period. He then settled in Outagamie county, purchasing land in Black Creek township, on which he resided until his death in 1895. Mrs. Maylahn died in 1909, aged ninety-six years. Of their nine children four are now living. Charles F. Maylahn was born January 17, 1854, and his education was secured in the schools of Germany. As a young man he worked for his father, with whom he came to the United States, and continued to assist in the duties of the home place until he had reached the age of thirty years, at which time he purchased his present splendid farm of 110 acres. He first erected a log cabin, later a log house, and now has a handsome brick residence, large barns and outbuildings and one of the best cultivated properties in Center township. The entire 110 acres are cleared and under cultivation, Mr. Maylahn carrying on general farming along scientific lines. In 1880 Mr. Maylahn was united in marriage with Paulina Sauberlich, daughter of Christian Sauberlich, of Greenville, and thirteen months later she died. In 1883 he was married (second) to Amelia Schultz, daughter of Carl Schultz, of Center township, and to this union there have been born ten children, of whom seven are now living: Alvina, who married Charles F. Selig and has three children, Rosetta, Clifford and Orville; Charles L., at home; and Julia, Cecelia, Amelia, Ruth and Naomi, all living at home. Mr. and Mrs. Maylahn are consistent members of the Evangelical Church, of which he was secretary for twenty years. In political matters he is a Republican .

FREDERICK JENKEL, a substantial citizen and representative farmer of Center township, is a son of John Jenkel, who came from Germany and settled in Winnebago county, Wisconsin, as a young man and later, in 1877, located in Outagamie county, buying the present farm of Frederick Jenkel. John Jenkel followed farming during the active years of his life, but in 1909 he retired from activities, sold his farm to his son, and settled down to spend the remainder of his life in well-earned rest. He was married in Germany in 1870, to Katherine Tepp, who was born in the Fatherland and died in 1909, in Center township. Frederick Jenkel was one of a family of five children, and was born April 7, 1874, in Germany, his father coming to this country in 1875. He here secured his education and attended school until he was nineteen years of age, and during his spare time assisted his father in the duties incidental to the operating of a home farm, also learning the cheesemaking trade. He followed the latter occupation for about four years, but when he had reached the age of twenty-four years, he purchased forty acres of land near the home farm. In 1899 he was married to Bertha Kuse, daughter of William Kuse, a well-known farmer of Cicero township, and to this union there have been born seven children: John, Anita, Benjamin, Irene, Helen, Clarence and Fred. After his marriage Mr. Jenkel continued to reside on the old home farm until 1909, at which time he bought his father's farm and here he has since been successfully engaged in general farming . He has made many improvements on this place, including the building of a new barn. Located on this property is an interesting reminder of pioneer days, an old log cabin, which was on the property when it was purchased by the elder Jenkel, and which was one of the first to be built in Outagamie county. Despite its great age, this old structure is in fairly good condition, and its state of preservation speaks well for the thorough manner in which its original owner worked .

Mr. and Mrs. Jenkel are members of the German Lutheran Church of Ellington. In politics Mr. Jenkel is a Democrat and he has served as assessor of Center township for two terms, and is now in his ninth or tenth year as clerk of the school board.

JOHN WITTLIN is a native of Wisconsin, having been born in the town of Germantown, Washington county, December 31, 1845, a son of Burkart and Catherine (Degen) Wittlin. Burkart Wittlin was born March 7, 1813, near Basel, in Switzerland, and came to the United States in 1844. He bought a farm in the town of Germantown, Washington county, Wisconsin, where he resided until July 4, 1864, when he moved to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and bought a farm comprising 320 acres of wild land, near the present residence of his son John, in the town of Center. On this farm he built a log house, 20x36 feet, in which he resided until his death, July 12, 1878. Mrs. Catherine Wittlin, also a native of Switzerland, was born near Basel, October 16, 1816, and died on the homestead in Outagamie county, February 27, 1893. To this honored couple were born four children, John being the oldest, all of whom are living. John Wittlin was reared to farming pursuits by his father, and was educated at the district school in his locality, and the German and English Academy in Milwaukee. On November 26, 1870, he married Miss Catherine Durick, daughter of Michael and Nora (O'Brien) Durick, natives of Limerick, Ireland, both of whom died near the residence of our subject, the father at the age of sixty-four and the mother when sixty-five. Miss Catherine Durick was born in Ozaukee county, Wisconsin, April 14, 1848, one of a family of five children, four of whom are still living .

To John Wittlin and wife have been born eleven children, of whom two died young: Michael J., born June 15, 1876, died September 17, 1876; Peter J., born June 20, 1885, died September 19, 1886. The others were born as follows: Catherine H., December 30, 1871, married Peter Nussbaum, of Ellington; Mary E., December 22, 1872, married Herman Frahm, of Grand Chute; John B., June 5, 1874; Margaret A., August 29, 1877, married John Casey, of Ellington; Emma A., August 13, 1879, married Robert O'Brien, of near Royalton, Waupaca county; Jane S., November 6, 1880; James F., June 22, 1883; Helen C., September 4, 1887; and Florence G., October 2, 1893 .

The mother of these children, after a short sickness and an unsuccessful operation at St. Elizabeth's Hospital, in Appleton, died October 28, 1910, and was buried in Ellington. She was a faithful member of St. Patrick's Catholic Church at Stephensville.

Mr. Wittlin, after his marriage, at once settled on his present farm, given to him by his father, his father giving each of the sons a tract of eighty acres, and here he has ever since been engaged in mixed farming, in which he has met with the good success his skill and industry deserve. In politics he is a member of the Democratic party, and cast his first presidential vote for Horatio Seymour in 1868. He has won the entire confidence of his fellow citizens. He has served as town clerk for eighteen years, district school clerk for forty years, and chairman of the town board two years. For twenty-two years he has been, and still is, one of the directors of the Farmers' Home Mutual Insurance Company. During five years he served as postmaster at Wittlin. Throughout his life, whether in official positions or private interests, Mr. Wittlin has displayed integrity of character and force of purpose that has gained for him an enviable reputation among his fellow townsmen .

H. L. BOWLBY, a well-known educator of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is proprietor of the Actual Business College, an institution with a wide reputation for efficiency, was born on a farm in Wyandot county, Ohio, November 7, 1878, a son of Nelson and, Louisa (Smith) Bowlby, who spent their lives in that state. Mr. Blowlby is the oldest of the five children of his parents, and he was first given a public school education and later entered the Ohio Normal University at Ada, from which he was graduated in 1900 in a scientific course. He then took a business course at Columbus, Ohio, graduating in 1901, and for a short while taught a country school near Columbus, but in 1902 came to Wisconsin and during the two years following was engaged in teaching for Bushey Brothers' Business College. On August 8, 1904, the Actual Business College was established in Appleton by H. L. Bowlby and A. M. Erling, the latter of whom retired January 28, 1911, at which time Mr. M. A. Schwab entered into partnership with Mr. Bowlby. From an enrollment of eight pupils, when the venture was started, the attendance has grown to 160 pupils annually, and the scope of the school has broadened in many ways. The aim of the institution is to fit its pupils to take their place in the business world without being handicapped by an ignorance of business methods, and the hundreds of pupils who have secured lucrative, congenial positions after taking the course testify to the efficiency of the system .

In 1906, Mr. Bowlby was married to Miss Carrie Johnston, of Appleton, the estimable daughter of Thomas E. Johnston, and they have had two sons: Claude and Byron. Mr. and Mrs. Bowlby are members of the Congregational Church. He is a Republican in political matters, and his fraternal connections are with the Elks .

MAX SCHWAB, a well-known young business man and educator of Appleton, Wisconsin, who with H. L. Bowlby is engaged in conducting the Actual Business College, was born in Two Rivers township, Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, February 3, 1880, a son of Edward and Agnes Schwab, natives of Berlin, Germany, who came to the United States in 1847. Edward Schwab was a farmer by occupation, and on coming to this country took up wild land, which he cleared, making a comfortable home for his family, and at one time owned 160 acres of land. His family consisted of ten children, of whom the youngest was Max. Max Schwab first attended the common schools of Manitowoc county, and then entered the Sheboygan Business College, from which he was graduated. After taking the course at the Scranton school, he represented their course in Wisconsin and Michigan for six years, and on January 28, 1911, formed a partnership with Mr. H. L. Bowlby, in the Actual Business College, a school organized by Mr. Bowlby and A. M. Erling, Mr. Erling leaving the school at the time that Mr. Schwab entered. From 1904, when it was organized, to the present time the school has increased its attendance from eight to 160 pupils, and it is rapidly gaining the reputation of being one of the best schools of its kind in Wisconsin .

On January 25, 1906, Mr. Schwab was united in marriage with Carrie Johannes, of Two Rivers, Wisconsin, and they have had one daughter, Wilma. The family home during the past four years has been in Appleton .

HENRY CLAY SLOAN. Prominent among the public men of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, who have been identified with the interests of this section during the past several decades, is the Hon. Henry Clay Sloan, assistant district attorney of Appleton and a leading member of the Outagamie county bar. Mr. Sloan was born in New York in 1847, a son of Judge A. Scott and Ann (Dodge) Sloan. A. Scott Sloan came to Wisconsin in 1854, locating at Beaver Dam, where he engaged in a law practice, and rose to the front ranks of his profession, holding some of the highest offices in the gift of the people. He served in the United States Congress, was for four years attorney general of Wisconsin, was circuit judge for thirteen years, and in addition to holding numerous local offices was the candidate in opposition to Judge Dickson for the office of Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Of his family of eight children one died in infancy and five are now living: Henry Clay; Mrs. Edward Dewey of Milwaukee; Catherine B.; Ledyard, L., of Beaver Dam. Henry Clay Sloan was educated in the public schools of Beaver Dam, and at the age of sixteen years enlisted in the Fifth Wisconsin Volunteers. He was made first lieutenant of Company I, Forty-eighth Wisconsin Volunteers, and on February 23, 1866, was commissioned second lieutenant of the Fourth Infantry, Regular Army, later rising to the rank of first lieutenant. He continued in the army until 1871, when he began studying law with his father, and in 1872 was admitted to the bar. After practicing a short time at Beaver Dam, he came to Appleton in the fall of 1874, but in 1881 removed to Milwaukee and remained there until 1889. He then began practicing his profession at Superior, Wisconsin, but in 1901 returned to Appleton, where he has since continued in a general practice. He was city attorney for Appleton for five years, and in 1880 was elected to the State Legislature, being returned to that body again in 1895 from Superior. He has also served as city attorney of Superior and as a member of the board of public works and president of the board of education of that city, and from 1895 until 1899 served as district attorney. He is now serving as assistant district attorney of Appleton .

On November 19, 1879, Mr. Sloan was married to Helen Lois Phinney. Mrs. Sloan is a member of the Congregational Church. Her father came to Wisconsin in 1849 and was identified with Lawrence University. Until 1881 Mr. Sloan was a Democrat, but since that time has been identified with the Republican party. He is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic. In all the positions to which he has been called Mr. Sloan has served with honor to himself and to the satisfaction of his constituents, and he is regarded as one of Outagamie county's leading citizens .

JAMES V. CANAVAN, M. D., mayor of Appleton, Wisconsin, and one of the leading members of the medical profession here, was born in Outagamie county, Wisconsin, January 22, 1860, and is a son of John and Bridget (Prunty) Canavan, who came from Worcester, Massachusetts, in 1855, and located on uncultivated land in Outagamie county. Mrs. Canavan is now deceased, but her husband still makes his home in Outagamie county, his life having been spent in tilling the soil. They had three daughters and one son. James V. Canavan was educated in the public schools of Outagamie county, after leaving which he entered Rush Medical College, Chicago, from which he was graduated in 1894. He immediately engaged in a general practice at Appleton, where his professional zeal, together with his skill as a physician and surgeon and his attentiveness to patients, soon won him a large and lucrative practice and insured his success. Prior to taking up the study of medicine, Dr. Canavan had served as county clerk of Outagamie for three terms, and he has always been active in political matters. In 1910 he was nominated for the office of chief executive of the city on the Democratic ticket, and was elected to that office, in which he is now serving. Dr. Canavan was married (first) to Miss Nora O'Brien, of Hollandtown, Wisconsin, and she died in March, 1900. Dr. Canavan was married (second) to Delia E. Grimes, whose death occurred in January, 1908. The doctor has had seven children, of whom two are now deceased .

DAVID STALKER, who is well known in the paper making trade in Wisconsin, is now manager of the Telulah Mill, a part of the large Kimberly-Clark interests of this section. Mr. Stalker was born in Scotland in 1865, and is a son of George and Elizabeth Stalker, natives of that country, who came to the United States in 1881, and settled in Holyoke, Massachusetts. David Stalker had received his education in the schools of his native land, and there started to learn the business which he was to make his life work. He was engaged in that business in Massachusetts, operating the Norman Paper Mill at Holyoke from 1893 until 1898, after which he was for a short time engaged in the same business in Connecticut. Returning to Massachusetts, he operated the mill at Pepperell, Middlesex county, Massachusetts, for two years and in the year 1902 came to Appleton to take charge of the Telulah Mill for the Kimberly- Clark Company, of which he has been the efficient manager to the present time. Mr. Stalker has a long and varied experience in this line of work, and is capable of handling any branch of the business in an expert manner. In February, 1891, Mr. Stalker was united in marriage with Miss Minnie F. White, who was born in East Hampton, Massachusetts, and to this union there has been born one daughter: Bessie. Mr. Stalker is fraternally connected with the Odd Fellows. He. and Mrs. Stalker are members of the Presbyterian Church, attending at Appleton, where the family residence is located .

FRANK WILSON, superintendent of the Atlas Paper Mills at Appleton, a branch of the Kimberly-Clark interests, and a well-known resident of Appleton, is a native of New York State, having been born at Waddington, St. Lawrence county, in 1854, a son of Spafford and Ann (Hatch) Wilson, the former a harnessmaker, now deceased, and the latter of whom attained the advanced age of ninety years. Frank Wilson entered the papermaking business as soon as he had acquired a common school education, working for seven years in the mill at Waddington, New York. In 1883 he came to Appleton, entering the employ of the Kimberly-Clark Company, for whom he operated a machine for a period covering twenty years. This long and faithful service was rewarded by his advancement to the position of superintendent of the Atlas Mills at Appleton, and his success, like the success of any other man, has been due to his untiring efforts along his special line, his faithfulness to duty, and a determination to rise above his fellows .

Mr. Wilson was married to Helen Rand, of Waddington, New York, and to this union there were born children; three of whom are deceased, the survivors being: Grace, who resides at home with her parents; and Anna, who is engaged in teaching. The family home is in Appleton .

WARREN M. WEBSTER, senior member of the planing mill firm of Warren M. Webster & Son, one of the old-established business houses of Appleton, Wisconsin, which has been carrying on transactions here for the past thirty years, was born in Oneida county, New York State in 1837, and is a son of Matthew and Electa Webster, both of whom died when Mr. Webster was a boy. Warren M. Webster was thrown on his own resources when a mere youth, and he entered a planing mill in his native state, where he learned the business thoroughly before entering the field on his own account. After successfully operating a mill in New York, in 1881 he came West to Wisconsin, and chose the city of Appleton for a site for his operations, erecting a mill which has done a steady, ever-increasing business here ever since. When his eldest son had attained his majority, Mr. Webster took him into partnership, organizing the firm of Warren M. Webster & Son, which has a reputation in its line second to none in this section. The Webster mill operates along general lines, making a specialty of job work. In 1861, Warren M. Webster was united in marriage with Lucy M. Scott, of Theresa, Jefferson county, New York, the home of Mr. Webster, and she died there. In 1871, Mr. Webster married (second) Eliza M. Copeland, a native of the Dominion of Canada, and four children were born to this union, namely: Mrs. Gertrude E. Gardner, who resides in Appleton; C. B., who is in business with his father; Mary E., who is a school teacher in Michigan; and George, residing at home. Mr. Webster is an old member of the Masonic fraternity, having joined the Blue Lodge in 1863, and has been a member of the Chapter since 1864. He is also a charter member of the Modern Woodmen's Lodge at Appleton .

WILLIAM H. TIMM, president of the Northern Boiler and Structural Iron Works at Appleton, Wisconsin, and a well-known and successful business man of this city, was born May 30, 1868, in Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, a son of John C. and Minnie Timm, farming people of that county. Mr. Timm, who has always been engaged in the business with which he is now connected, came to Appleton November 4, 1898, and bought a half-interest in the Fairbanks Machine Shop, at which time the Fairbanks & Timm Machine Shop was organized, and this company continued to operate successfully until June, 1905, when the Appleton Steam Boiler Works Company was organized by Messrs. Timm, Schott and Heinzman, this style continuing until April, 1908. At this time Mr. Timm and a few of the smaller stockholders of the company organized the Northern Boiler and Structural Iron Works, with William H. Timm as president, W. A. Bruce as treasurer and A. M. Knorr as secretary. The company manufactures a full line of boilers, structural steel and tanks and all kinds of sheet iron work, and its product aggregates on an average of $30,000 yearly, employing the services of fifteen skilled mechanics. The one-story factory, with dimensions 50x80 feet, is fitted with all modern appliances used in this kind of work, operated by electric power, and the goods are shipped all over the United States. Under Mr. Timm's able management the business of the company has increased steadily, and it is rapidly taking its place among the large industries of this section .

In August, 1894, Mr. Timm was united in marriage with Theresia Schott, of Manitowoc county, Wisconsin, and to this union there have been born four daughters and two sons, one daughter and one son being deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Timm are members of the German Methodist Church. He is a member of the Equitable Fraternal Union and holds membership in the Masons and Odd Fellows fraternities.

MICHAEL GLUECKSTEIN, who has been connected with the brewing interests of Appleton as bookkeeper for a long period, is now identified with the Appleton Brewing Company. Mr. Glueckstein is a native of Germany, he having been born in the Fatherland, February 24, 1849, a son of Michael and Katherine (Roemer) Glueckstein, the former of whom died in Germany. In 1867 Mrs. Glueckstein brought her seven children to the United States, six children having died in the old country, and four of the seven are still surviving. Mrs. Glueckstein first located at Two Rivers, Wisconsin, but later moved to Appleton, and her death occurred at the home of her son-in-law in Two Rivers. Michael Glueckstein received his education in the parochial schools of his native country, and was eighteen years of age when he came to this country with his mother, where he also worked as a mail carrier and taught school, and in his native town had served for a time as secretary to the mayor. On his arrival in this country he first found employment in a factory at Two Rivers and Appleton until engaging with the Walters Brewery at Appleton, as bookkeeper, being connected with that concern for a period covering sixteen and one-half years. He has been with the Appleton Brewing Company since 1900 .

In 1880 Mr. Glueckstein was married to Elizabeth Huberty, of Freedom township, Outagamie county, daughter of Peter Huberty, and they have had four children: C. Christina, Hildegard, Peter Joseph and Oliva, all at home except Peter Joseph, who is preparing for the priesthood. The family are members of the Catholic Church. In politics Mr. Glueckstein is a Democrat .

HUBERT WOLF, deceased. In the death of Hubert Wolf, which occurred December 27, 1909, Outagamie county lost one of its prominent citizens and representative men, one who always had the interest of his community at heart and who could be depended upon to serve his county or city ably and efficiently in any office to which he was called. Mr. Wolf was born August 22, 1833, in Germany, a son of Henry and Helena Wolf, and the family came to the United States in the fall of 1854. The first year was spent in Menasha, Wisconsin, and in 1855 the family removed to a wild farm in Outagamie county, on which there had been but a small clearing made, and here Mr. Wolf's parents continued to carry on agricultural pursuits the remainder of their lives. At the time of their death, Hubert Wolf took charge of the old home place, and he was engaged in farming there until 1900, when he laid down his active agricultural duties and came to Appleton. Mr. Wolf served as township treasurer and as a member of the school board, was chairman of the county board for many years, and in 1895 and 1896 was sent to the State Legislature. In political matters he was a Democrat and was looked upon as one of the leaders of his party in Outagamie county. On June 8, 1867, Mr. Wolf was married to Matilda Bartman, who was born in Germany and came to the United States at the age of twenty-one years with her brother. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Wolf, as follows: William F., an attorney at La Crosse, Wisconsin; Henry, a ranchman in Canada; Helen, residing at home, representative for the Curtis Publishing Company; Frank, who conducts a boot and shoe establishment at Wittenberg, Wisconsin; Albert C., an attorney, at La Crosse; Ida, a teacher in the Fourth Ward schools, and Hubert, an attorney, in Milwaukee .

F. HEINEMANN, Justice of the Peace, Appleton, Wisconsin. Born in Prussia February 10, 1841. Came to the United States with his widowed mother, Theresa Heinemann, two brothers and three sisters in the year 1847. The family first located at Chicago, remaining there until 1855, when they removed to Manitowoc, where the family made their home. Mr. Heinemann is a self-educated man, with but an attendance of three months of school to his credit . Before the War of the Rebellion he was a clerk in the post offices of Two Rivers and at Manitowoc and also served an apprenticeship as a druggist. Entered service in 1861 as a Corporal in Co. "B," 9th Wis. Vols. Infy.; was detached from his company in February, 1862, on staff duty as a clerk at Department Headquarters; was advanced to First Lieutenant in a Kansas Cavalry Regiment. Was commissioned as Captain and A. A. General in January, 1865, but declined -- the war coming practically to an end -- and returned to his occupation as a druggist, having covered a service of over three years. In 1885 Mr. Heinemann removed with his family to Appleton, where he has since continued to reside. He has served since the war; four years as a clerk in the State Treasurer's office; four terms as clerk of the City of Manitowoc prior to his removal to Appleton, and over twenty years as a Justice of the Peace of the City of Appleton. In 1877 Mr. Heinemann was married to Miss Katie Voelchert, of Manitowoc. One child was born to them, Fred V. Heine- mann, an attorney in practice at Appleton .

ALBERT VOECKS, secretary of the Aid Association for Lutherans, is one of the well-known citizens of Appleton. He was born in Pomerania, Germany, July 29, 1867, a son of August and Marie (Wallman) Voecks, who brought their family to America, in 1882, locating in Appleton, where Mr. Voecks was engaged in wagonmaking until his death in 1907, his wife having passed away twenty years before. Both were members of the Lutheran Church, of which Mr. Voecks was a trustee for many years. They had a family of six children, of whom three came to the United States: Albert; Marie, who died in 1889; and Minnie, the wife of William Henning of Appleton. Albert Voecks attended the public schools of Appleton, and later went to night school while working in a printing office. He continued to be employed as a printer until 1902, when with G. D. Ziegler he organized the Aid Association for Lutherans, an insurance association for members of the Lutheran Church, which started with 603 members in 1903, with money on hand aggregating $2,291.98, and on March 21, 1911, showed a statement of 6,454 members and cash on hand $212,102.55. This association was organized to pay death and sickness benefits, and now operates in Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota and Illinois. On October 4, 1899, Mr. Voecks was married to Caroline Goetz, of Cadott, Wisconsin, and they have five children: Herbert, Walter, Victor, Marie and Carl. The family is connected with the Lutheran Church, and Mr. Voecks is president of the Lutheran congregation .

FREDERICK GLASSBRENNER, one of the enterprising young agriculturists of Outagamie county, who is operating his seventy-eight-acre farm in Grand Chute township along scientific lines, was born near Apple Creek, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, January 18, 1882, a son of Frederick and Sophia (Moll) Glassbrenner, natives of Wittenberg, Germany. The parents of Mr. Glassbrenner came to America in 1881 and located in Center township, where Mr. Glassbrenner worked at the shoemaker's trade for a time, and later was employed in the Appleton paper mills. As soon as he had accumulated sufficient capital he bought a farm in Freedom township, but about eight years later went back to Center township, where he and Mrs. Glassbrenner reside on an eighty-acre farm. They were the parents of nine children, namely: Frederick; Louisa, who married R. Goetzke, a resident of Milwaukee; and Katharine, Charles, Gottlieb, Lena, Mary, Henry and Margaret, all of whom are single and residing at home. Frederick Glassbrenner received his education in the district schools of Grand Chute and Center townships, and worked on the home farm and on farms in the vicinity until he was seventeen years old. On attaining his majority he became a farm hand in Center township during the summer months, and during the winters worked in the woods, continuing to work thus until the spring of 1909, when he bought his present farm. Mr. Glassbrenner has not married, and at present is keeping "Bachelor's Hall." He is independent in politics, and as yet has found no time to engage actively in affairs of a public nature .

MICHAEL KOHL, who owns one of the finest farms in Grand Chute township, a tract of 200 acres of well-cultivated land, on which he carries on general farming, dairying and cattle raising, is a native of this township, having been born on the School Section Road, November 14, 1870, a son of John and Elizabeth (Friese) Kohl, the former born in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, in February, 1849, and the latter in Luxemburg in 1851. John Kohl came to the United States with his parents when he was only four years of age, and the family during the next twelve years resided in Milwaukee. During the Civil War they came to Appleton, where John Kohl grew to manhood on the farm occupied by his parents on the School Section Road, and he was reared to the occupation of a farmer, becoming one of the prominent men of his district and the owner of 340 acres of land. In the fall of 1908 he sold all of this property except forty acres and retired to Appleton, his home now being at No. 1167 Packard street. For a number of years Mr. Kohl also operated a threshing outfit throughout this township. He and his wife were the parents of twelve children, of whom seven are now living: Michael; Joseph, residing on School Section Road, a farmer; Theresa, the wife of Gustave Schultz, a mason contractor of State street, Appleton; Louisa, the wife of Emil Heidman, a cigarmaker, residing on the Sherman place; Magdalena, a teacher in the Fifth Ward school, Appleton, residing with her parents; Charles, a farmer of Grand Chute township; and Emma, a graduate of Bush Business College, Appleton, who makes her home with her parents .

Michael Kohl attended the school on School Section road for some time, and later was at St. Joseph's school for one term and the Third Ward school for a like period. At the age of eighteen years he went to Seattle, Washington, working as driver of a six-horse team for a grading and freighting company, and went thence to Tacoma, Olympia and Centralia, in that state, being engaged in construction work. Later he was located at Grays Harbor, Washington, and then went to North Dakota, working as second feeder with a threshing outfit for two years, and during that winter came home. During the following summer he had charge of the separator of the same outfit, and then spent the winter at home, but during the following spring became a railroad fireman on the Ashland Division of the Northwestern Railroad, a position which he held for two years. Mr. Kohl was then married and engaged in carpentering until the following fall, when he bought his present property at that time a badly run down and unimproved property, with delapidated buildings. At about the same time Mr. Kohl purchased a threshing outfit with his brother Joseph, and this they operated together for fourteen years, Mr. Kohl in the meantime gradually improving his property until he had made it one of the finest in the township. In 1898 he built a barn 40x96 feet, and ten years later erected his residence, one of the best in Grand Chute township, thoroughly equipped with hot and cold water and all modern conveniences, which would be a credit to any community. The other buildings on the property are up to the standard in comparison, and the whole property shows that the owner is an industrious and enterprising man. Modern machinery and a gasoline engine are used on this farm, and Mr. Kohl's versatility may be seen when it is known that he built all of his buildings himself. He carries on general farming, dairying and stockraising, and has been eminently successful in his undertakings .

On September 28, 1893, Mr. Kohl was married to Elizabeth Weiland, who was born on the Freedom Road, Grand Chute township, June 16, 1868, daughter of John and Eva (Schmitz) Weiland . John Weiland was born June 16, 1838, in Prizen, Germany, and came to America when about eighteen years of age with his mother, his father having died in Germany. They located in Granville township, Milwaukee county, and several years later came to Grand Chute township, where Mr. Weiland became the owner of 180 acres of land on the Freedom Road. There his wife, who was born December 25, 1842, died aged about fifty years, and about one year later Mr. Weiland was married again and moved to Appleton, locating near the Third Ward school, where he is now living retired. Mr. and Mrs. Weiland had the following children: Elizabeth, who married Mr. Kohl; Bernhardt, who is living on the Freedom Road; Nicholas, who makes his home on the old homestead; Frederick, a farmer residing near Kaukauna; Agnes, who married John Kettenhafen, residing on Erie street, Appleton; and Henrietta, a sister in the Notre Dame Convent. Mr. and Mrs. Kohl have seven children, all living at home, as follows: John P., born May 2, 1894; Mary, September 6, 1895; Laura, February 10, 1898; Margaret, February 17, 1901; Henrietta, November 7, 1903; Edward, October 25, 1905; and Helen, September 21, 1910. The family are members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, at Appleton. Mr. Kohl is independent in politics, and has never aspired to public office, although he has served in the capacity of road overseer of Grand Chute township. He has recently purchased a new five-passenger, thirty-horsepower "Clark" automobile and enjoys life as a man of his temperament can properly .

ANTON F. ULLRICH, an enterprising young farmer of Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, owning 160 acres of good farming land, has also engaged extensively in cattle raising, and has been a resident of this section all of his life. He was born in Appleton, Wisconsin, March 3, 1876, a son of Justin and Barbara (Leish) Ullrich, natives of Germany. Justin Ullrich came to the United States at the age of nineteen years, and immediately came to Wisconsin, where for a few years he worked among the agriculturists of Grand Chute township as a farm hand, and then rented and later bought a farm one mile south of the present property of Anton F. Ullrich. Here he carried on agricultural pursuits until 1909, and in that year retired and moved to Appleton, he and his wife living in their modern home on Spencer street. They were the parents of five children, as follows: Anton F.; Mary, who married Alvin Boehme, a butcher of Appleton; Theresa, the wife of Henry H. Schlitz, also living in Appleton; Rosana, who is deceased; and Lucy, who is single and living with her parents. Anton F. Ullrich attended the district schools of Grand Chute township, and ever since he has been fourteen years old has been engaged in farming. He resided with his parents until he was married, and then took charge of the old homestead, to which he has added eighty acres, and now has all but thirty acres under cultivation. General and dairy farming has occupied his attention, and in addition to keeping a number of cows for his dairy purposes, is engaged in raising thoroughbred Holstein cattle. Mr. Ullrich also operates a threshing outfit during threshing seasons, having carried this on for the past fifteen years, and is a practical machinist and engineer. Although he is independent in politics and has not found time to enter actively into political campaigns as a candidate for any office, he takes a keen interest in local matters, and has been identified with a number of movements which have had for their object the betterment of conditions in Grand Chute township. On November 9, 1899, Mr. Ullrich was married to Louise Ebert, who was born in Appleton, May 12, 1877, daughter of William Ebert of Grand Chute township, and they have had three children: Isabel, born September 1, 1901; Vanita, born May 9, 1903; and Carl, May 5, 1904, all of whom are residing at home .

JOHN F. SCHOETTLER, who has spent a long period in Grand Chute township as an agriculturist, has identified himself with various important industries, and has been prominent in public matters here for a number of years. Mr. Schoettler was born in Greenville township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, June 10, 1860, and is a son of Christoph and Caroline (Burr) Schoettler, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany. Christoph Schoettler was born January 6, 1832, and when twenty-one years of age came to the United States, locating in New York City, where he was married to Caroline Burr, a native of Germany, born September 17, 1832, who had come to this country in 1852 with a sister and brother-in-law. Mr. Schoettler secured work as a blacksmith, a trade which he had learned in Germany, but soon decided to come west, and accordingly located in Neenah, Wisconsin, where he was engaged in various occupations, principally railroad work, until 1859. In that year he went to Greenville township, where he erected a blacksmith shop on a neighbor's land and remained there a few years, but eventually came to the conclusion that he would meet with better success as a farmer, and subsequently, in about 1861, he bought a forty-acre tract of land, having at this time only five dollars to put down as a first payment. He continued to follow blacksmithing in connection with his farming activities until 1874, at which time he gave up the former occupation in order to give his whole attention to his farm, and here he continued for more than twenty years more, retiring in 1895 and removing to Appleton. After the death of his wife, November 19, 1905, he returned to the old homestead, where he now lives with his son. He and his wife had three children, namely: Charles A., a retired citizen living at the corner of Law and Eldorado streets, Appleton; John F.; and Henry C., who is conducting the old homestead farm .

John F. Schoettler attended the Greenville township schools and the Roman Catholic school at Menasha for two years, and then started to help his father on the home farm, continuing there until his marriage, at which time, he rented a farm from his father in Greenville township. Five years later he purchased his present farm, an excellent tract of eighty acres, and forty acres in the section adjoining. Here he has made numerous improvements, which include a handsome and modern residence, a large, substantial barn and other buildings, neat and well-built fences, lawns and shade trees and every modern convenience to be found in an up-to-date Wisconsin farm. He uses the latest power farm machinery in his operations, and his crops are large and find a ready market. Mr. Schoettler is a large stockholder in the Wisconsin Oil and Gas Company, and recently disposed of a large part of his holdings at a price that justified the expectations he had when he purchased his stock and verified his good judgment. Since 1889 he has been agent for the Farmers' Home Insurance Company, and he is a director and trustee for the Aid Assocation for Lutherans, of Appleton, which was incorporated in 1902, and has paid to its beneficiaries more than $100,000, in sick, accident, old age and death benefits. This firm has a good reserve fund and is located over the Commercial National Bank. Mr. Schoettler is independent in politics, not being bound by party lines, and votes more for the man and his principles than for the organization whose ticket he represents. He has served as town clerk for twelve years and as school clerk for a like period .

In November, 1882, Mr. Schoettler was married (first) to Caroline Palmbach, who was born in Greenville township, July 4, 1859, daughter of Michael and Barbara (Schultz) Palmbach, natives of Bavaria. On first coming to the United States they located in Milwaukee for some years and then came to Outagamie county and located in Greenville township, where they were engaged in agricultural operations during the remainder of their lives. Mrs. Schoettler died July 15, 1895, having been the mother of three children: Selma, born September 7, 1883, who married J. E. Meyer, a Montana farmer; Lillie, born May 17, 1890, who died September 29, 1891; and Linda, born July 9, 1895, who died the day following. Mr. Schoettler was married (second) October 30, 1895, to Mrs. Henrietta (Lauden) Paepke, who was born December 29, 1862, in Clayton, Winnebago county, Wisconsin, daughter of Henry and Charlotta (Krueger) Lauden, natives of Mecklenburg, Germany. Henry Lauden was born July 27, 1819, and his wife January 9, 1826, and they came to the United States in 1849, living for a time at Tonawanda, New York, from whence they came to Winnebago county and settled on a farm. After residing for eighteen years on this property, they sold out and moved to Neenah, and here the father died in 1899, while his widow has been living with Mr. and Mrs. Schoettler since 1908. Mrs. Schoettler, who was her parents' only child, was married (first) August 2, 1883, to Henry Paepke born in Germany, March 26, 1857, and to this union there were born two children: Henry, born April 28, 1885, who died June 4, 1885; and Charlotta, born September 22, 1887, who is single and resides with her mother. Mr. and Mrs. Schoettler have had three children: Martha, born November 11, 1896; Henrietta, born May 31, 1898; and Elmer, born August 13, 1905.

AUGUST WERNER, who has spent more than a quarter of a century in agricultural pursuits in Seymour township, is now the owner of an excellent property on Section 17. He is a native of Posen. Germany, where he was born January 30, 1847, a son of Fred and Wilhelmina (Detzloff) Werner, whose other three children, Henry, Ida and William, were born in the United States. The family came to this country in 1855, being seven weeks on the ocean in a sailing vessel, and landed at Quebec, Canada, from whence they came to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, by water. They stayed two months in the Cream City and then drove with an ox-team to Brown county, settling on eighty acres of wild land at a time when there was but one settler between them and Lopier, an old French-Canadian. Here Mr. and Mrs. Werner continued to live during the remainder of their lives, he living until seventy-four years of age and she dying when fifty-five. August Werner remained on the home farm with his parents, receiving his education in the little old red log schoolhouse . He secured 120 acres of wild land in Seymour township, and here he has been engaged in general farming and stockraising to the present time. He makes a specialty of raising good colts, and also has a well-kept, highly productive apple orchard .

Mr. Werner was married in 1867 to Helena Fodeluck, who was born in Pomerania, Germany, August 29, 1851, and to this union there have been born the following children: Anna, Otto, Herman, William, Gusta, Lizzie, Bertha, Mary, Paul and August, all of whom are living. Mr. Werner has never found time from his agricultural duties to engage actively in politics, but he takes a keen interest in public affairs in his township, and may always be found supporting those movements which have for their object the advancement of Seymour township and Outagamie county .

FRED BARTELS, who is cultivating the old Bartels homestead farm in Seymour township, is one of the progressive agriculturists of this section, and has resided in Outagamie county all of his life. He was born at Greenville, Wisconsin, October 26, 1872, a son of Henry and Caroline (Rump) Bartels. Henry Bartels was born in Mecklenberg-Schwerin, Germany, and on first coming to the United States, in 1867, he located in Chicago, where he remained for one year. He then spent two years on farms near Chicago, after which he came to Wisconsin and located in Outagamie county, securing employment from the farmers in the vicinity of Greenville until he had accumulated enough, in 1874, to purchase the homestead on Section 19. He cultivated this property from virgin soil into one of the finest farms in Seymour township, and gradually advanced from the days of the log cabin to those of the modern ten-room frame house, and at the time of his death, May 16, 1910, when he was seventy-seven years old, he was one of the substantial farmers and respected members of the Lutheran Church of this section. Mrs. Bartels, whom Mr. Bartels married March 4, 1867, in Chicago, died in 1899, when sixty-three years of age. They had three children: John, who died aged three years; Henry, who was one year old at the time of his death; and Fred .

Fred Bartels received his education in the district schools, was reared to manhood on the home farm, and remained there until his father's death, at which time he took up the active management of the place. He was married in 1892 to Emma Lenz, who was born in Germany, a daughter of Louis Lenz. She was born March 15, 1871, and came to the United States alone when she was twenty-one years old, her mother having died when she was three years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Bartels have had these children: Hulda, born December 16, 1893; Carl, born January 2, 1897, who died October 3, 1909; Hubert B., born January 3, 1900; Thusnelda, born February 11, 1905; and William, born January 29, 1909. The family belong to the Lutheran Church. Mr. Bartels has improved the home place since taking up the management, and it presents a well-kept appearance that speaks well for the ability of its owner. He is interested in movements that he thinks will tend to advance the community in an educational, agricultural or industrial way, and can be counted upon to lend his influence, time and means in behalf of such measures .

ARCHIE BEGGS, who during a long and active life carried on agricultural pursuits in Outagamie county, is one of the self-made men of this section, having started to work as a boy of eight years in a Massachusetts cotton factory and worked his way to a place among the substantial men of Seymour township. He was born in the Province of Quebec, Canada, October 16, 1837, son of William and Jane (Craig) Beggs, who were married in Scotland and had begun farming operations when William Beggs lost his life by drowning in the English river. At that time Archie Beggs was an infant and his mother took him to live with his grandfather, Archibald Craig, who died when Archie was a lad of eight years. The lad was without friends and with no alternative but to support himself, and he eventually found employment in a Massachusetts cotton factory, working for an old lady by the name of Mrs. Simples. When only sixteen or seventeen years of age he made his way west to Wisconsin, settling at Belle Plaine, and started work in the lumber mills and on the river, occupations which he continued until settling on 120 acres of wild land in Seymour township. His present fine property bears little resemblance to the wilderness which he found on first coming to this section, and the handsome frame residence in which he now resides brings no memories of the rude log cabin which was his first home; nor do the beautiful shade trees which he has planted to ornament his well-kept lawn suggest the heavy, gnarled timber which he was compelled to uproot before he could plant his first crop. Mr. Beggs has taken part in the marvelous development of Outagamie county, and has done his full share of duty to himself and to his township .

In 1865 Mr. Beggs was married to Anna Easton, also a native of Quebec, born May 12, 1841, a daughter of William and Mary (Thompson) Easton, who came from Scotland. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Beggs, namely: Anna, deceased, who married a Mr. Clark; Mamie, who married a Mr. Clark; Jessie, who is now Mrs. Risener, and Sadie, who is living at home with her father. The family are connected with the Congregational Church .

JOHN HACKWORTHY, president and treasurer of the Hackworthy Construction Company, one of the large contracting industries of Appleton, was born in England, in 1852, a son of George and Mary (Leigh) Hackworthy, both of whom died in that country. Mr. Hackworthy secured his education in his native country, and when he had attained his majority he came to the United States, first locating in Chicago for a short time and coming to Appleton in September of 1873. He followed the trade of mason for about ten years and then started contracting. About 1894 a partnership was formed between the brothers, John and R. F., and C. H. Vinal, and the firm was incorporated in 1905 with John Hackworthy, president; Robert F. Hackworthy, vice-president, and C. H. Vinal, secretary. The firm has erected the county insane asylums in Outagamie, Dunn and Trempealeau counties, numerous store buildings, canals and power houses and pulp mills, and has employed as many as 250 men on one contract. Mr. Hackworthy was married in 1874, to Ellen Perrot, of Appleton, and to this union there have been born four children, namely: Lynn F., who is deceased; Louis F., residing at home; Rena, who married A. C. Rule, now secretary of the company; and Adelaide, residing at home, who is a student in the Conservatory of Music. Mr. Hackworthy is an independent voter, and is a member of the Odd Fellows and the Elks. He has always been identified with the progress and development of Appleton, and it was his concern which did the first brick paving here, as well as in Oshkosh and Manitowoc. He is a director in the Citizens' National Bank.

GABRIEL ULLMAN, who is a member of the stock firm of J. Ullman and Company, and one of the best-known men in fraternal circles in Appleton, was born in Prussia, Germany, June 24, 1847, a son of Bernard and Dorothy (Strause) Ullman. Mr. Ullman came to Appleton in August, 1866, and for a time clerked in the mercantile establishment of D. Hammel & Company, who later sold out to a Mr. Stiefel, of Butler, Indiana, whose partner Mr. Ullman became in 1869. In 1870 Mr. Ullman bought out Mr. Stiefel's interest, and he continued to operate the business for a period covering fourteen years, when he joined his brothers Joseph and D. L. in the stock and real estate business. The firm of J. Ullman and Company is known all over Wisconsin and the surrounding states as one of the largest horse trading firms in this part of the country, and the members of the firm have the reputation of being among the best judges of horseflesh in the country. Gabriel Ullman arranged for the building of the Sutherland Building, was its first tenant, and lived therein for about ten years. He was married June 18, 1871, to Amelia Strauss, who had been his schoolmate in Europe, a sister of Mrs. Jacob Hammel, and they have had three children: Rose, who married Albert Cohn, of Milwaukee; Belle F., who married Jacob M. Ullman, deceased, formerly of Cleveland, Ohio; and Edward B., a traveling salesman of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Mr. Ullman is the only surviving charter member of Rhine Lodge of Odd Fellows, which was to have been named Ryan Lodge in honor of Judge Sam J. Ryan, Past Grand Master, but which on account of the laws of the order prohibiting the naming of a lodge after a living person, was called Rhine Lodge, most of the charter members being natives of the River Rhine. He is also identified with Appleton Encampment, No. 16, of Odd Fellows, Waverly Lodge and Appleton Chapter of Masons, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Honor and the Independent Order of B'nai B'rith. He was one of the charter members of the German School Society, an organization which is now dissolved, but which at one time flourished here as an association of German schools, and dissolved when the City of Appleton employed teachers to teach German in its public schools. Mr. Ullman is one of Appleton's good citizens, and can always be counted upon to further the interests of his county or city .

JOSEPH ULLMAN is one of the best-known horse buyers in Northern Wisconsin, and the reputation of the firm of J. Ullman and Company in this line is not limited to the confines of this state, for every year it ships upwards of 1,500 horses all over the country. Mr. Ullman is a native of Germany, from which country he came to the United States in 1871, at the age of seventeen years. His parents, Bernard and Dorothy (Strause) Ullman; came to America at a later date and spent the remainder of their lives here. Mr. Ullman worked with his brother until 1876, when he established the business with which he is now connected, beginning in a small building and constantly increasing the business until in 1907 he bought a building from Loeb & Hammel, successors of D. Hammel & Company, which has a floor space 120x140 feet, and accommodates 200 head of horses. Branches of the business are located at Clintonville, Antigo, Ironwood, Michigan and Ashland. The company buys and sells about 1,500 head of horses per year, and also deals extensively in mules, its operations covering nearly every state in the Union. In 1879 Mr. Ullman was married to Pauline Weinfield, born at Carlsbad, Germany, daughter of Jacob and Barbara (Pick) Weinfield, who came to this country in 1869 and located in Appleton, Mr. Weinfield being engaged in the stock and grain business here until his death. Six children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Ullman, namely: Blanche, who married Herman Peel, of Milwaukee; Sam, who represents the company at Antigo; Adele, residing at home; Esther, who married D. M. Stern, of Chicago; Fred, who is with his brother-in-law, Mr. Peel, in Milwaukee; and Beatrice, who is studying music in Chicago. Mr. Ullman is a member of the Masons and Odd Fellows, and has also been connected with various organizations having for their object the advancement of Appleton along industrial lines .

AUGUST KNUPPEL, president of the Appleton Lumber and Fuel Company, one of this city's large contracting firms, and president of the Fox River Marble, Granite and Cut Stone Works, was born October 4, 1857, in Germany, a son of Henry and Josephine Knuppel, both of whom spent their lives in the Fatherland. August A. Knuppel gained his education in the schools of his native country and took a course in a school of architecture at Hoexter on the banks of the River Weser, after which he learned the trade of builder. He came to the United States in 1879 and after spending one month in Philadelphia and six months in Milwaukee, worked at his trade at various places until 1881, when he came to Appleton. In 1882 he entered the contracting business and he still follows that occupation. In 1900 Mr. Knuppel organized the Appleton Lumber & Fuel Company, and in 1904 he organized the Fox River Marble, Granite and Cut Stone Works. Mr. Knuppel was the builder of the Congregational Church, the Lincoln School, the Lincoln Mill of the Fox River Paper Company, the Walter brewery, the Brokaw mill at Wausau, Wisconsin, and numerous bank and hotel buildings in and out of Outagamie county. Since 1909 he has engaged exclusively in public improvement contracts and has constructed several miles of local pavement. In 1911, after the adoption of the commission form of municipal government, Mr. Knuppel was a candidate for the office of mayor. He was nominated at the primaries but lost the final election by the narrow margin of two votes. In 1881 Mr. Knuppel was united in marriage with Adeline Machmueller, daughter of Gottfried Machmueller, of Mayville, Wisconsin. Three children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Knuppel, namely: Eugenia, who married George R. Wettengel, an insurance man of Appleton; Arnold, a graduate of the academic class of 1908 at the University of Wisconsin, in business with his father; and Amanda, residing at home, who is studying with the view of becoming a teacher of physical culture. Mr. Knuppel is a member of the Odd Fellows, the Sons of Herman and the Elks .

WILLIAM BUCHANAN, manager of the Appleton Wire Works, manufacturers of fourdrinier wires, cylinder covers and washer wires, and the second largest concern of its kind in the United States, is one of the veterans of this industry, having been connected with it during a long and active career. The Appleton Wire Works were established in 1895, the buildings being erected in 1895 and 1896 and occupied during the spring of the latter year. William Buchanan was elected manager; G. E. Buchanan, secretary-treasurer; John R. Buchanan, sales manager, and A. B. Weissenborn, superintendent. The brass wire cloth manufactured by the concern is used by paper manufacturers, and the $200,000 annual output supplies nearly the whole trade of the Fox River Valley, as well as concerns all over the United States, Mexico, Canada, China and Japan. Employment is given to 100 men in two blocks of buildings of two-story character, covering 50,000 square feet; steam and electric power is used, and the looms are worked by compressed air and electricity under a method invented by A. B. Weissenborn.

William Buchanan was born in Scotland, in 1842, and is a son of Robert and Jean (McVicker) Buchanan, who came to the United States in 1847. Robert Buchanan, who was a hand weaver, was one of the first in this business in this country, going to work for the first company manufacturing wire cloth in the United States, William Stevens & Son, at Belleville, New Jersey. Later he was connected with the De Witt Wire Cloth Company, and then established the Buchanan Bolt Wire Company at Holyoke, Massachusetts, with which he was connected up to the time of his death. William Buchanan was foreman of the De Witt Wire Cloth Company for nine years, at Belleville, New Jersey, and in 1876 he left this company to organize the firm of Buchanan & Smith, at Bloomfield, New Jersey. In 1878 John Eastwood was admitted to the firm, which now does business under the firm style of Eastwood Wire Manufacturing Company, the largest concern of its kind in the United States, and in 1882 Mr. Buchanan sold his interests and moved to Springfield, Massachusetts, where he became foreman of the Cheney Bigelow Wire Works, establishing the fourdrinier department for them. In 1896 with his two sons, G. E. and J. R. and his brother-in-law, A. B. Weissenborn, he established the Appleton Wire Works. In 1869, Mr. Buchanan was married to Annette Weissenborn, daughter of Henry and Therese Weissenborn, of Franklin, New Jersey, and four children were born to this union: Gustavus E., Annette, John R. and Theresa, deceased .

Of the foregoing children Gustavus E. Buchanan was born March 7, 1870, in Belleville, New Jersey, and received his education in the schools of that place and Springfield, Massachusetts, after which he was engaged with the Cheney Bigelow Works for eight years as bookkeeper. He married Josephine Marston Pond, of Appleton, daughter of O. W. Pond, and they have two children: William E. and Josephine. He is a member of the Blue Lodge and Chapter of the Masons. Annette Buchanan is living at home. John R. Buchanan married Anna B. Johnson of Springfield, Massachusetts. He was born at Belleville, New Jersey, December 4, 1871, and for some years after leaving school was connected with Smith & Wesson. He is a member of the Elks, and has two children: Dorothy and Gertrude. The Buchanan family has always been connected with the Congregational Church .

ALBERT B. WEISSENBORN, superintendent of the Appleton Wire Works, one of Appleton's largest industries, and the second largest concern of its kind in the United States, was born at Newark, New Jersey, in 1863, a son of Henry and Therese Weissenborn. Henry Weissenborn, who was born and educated in Germany, was a civil engineer by profession and came to the United States as a young man, becoming interested in the iron business. He built a blast furnace for the Bethlehem Iron Works, and later was employed by Mr. John Erickson, along with his two brothers, to develop the battleship "Monitor," which played such an important part as the "Cheese Box" during the Civil War. In 1896 Albert Weissenborn became connected with William Buchanan and his two sons, G. E. and John R. Buchanan, in organizing the Appleton Wire Works, and he is now superintendent of the company's large plant at Appleton, and has introduced many new innovations in the business, being the inventor of a method of utilizing electricity and compressed air in operating the looms. The company manufactures fourdrinier wires, cylinder covers and washer wires, and repairs and makes cylinder molds and dandy rolls, and has a business which covers the Fox River Valley and extends to China, Japan and Mexico. Mr. Weissenborn's wife is deceased, and he has one daughter, who is attending school .

EAGLE MANUFACTURING COMPANY. Prominent among the large manufacturing concerns of Appleton, Wisconsin, may be mentioned the Eagle Manufacturing Company, which sends its goods, notably traction engines and silo feed cutters, to every large point in the United States, with its trade-mark "Eagle" stamped thereon. Originally organized by Richard Miller, John Kanouse and William Polifka as the Eagle Fork Company, it was incorporated in 1888 by Messrs. Miller and Polifka and E. W. Saiberlich under its present name, and since that time the business has grown steadily, until now it is rated among the largest concerns of its kind doing business in Northern Wisconsin. Until 1904 the factory was located on the river front, using water power, but since that year has been situated at No. 624 Winnebago street, and sixty horsepower engines, of kerosene power and of the company's own make are used, and the output of the factory is about $70,000 annually. Feed cutters were manufactured exclusively until 1901, when the company began making traction engines, and since that time other articles have been added gradually to its product. About thirty-two skilled mechanics are employed, and the main shop covers a floor space of 40x231 feet, the foundry and grinding room 40x149 feet, the woodworking building 40x72 feet and basement, and the warehouse, two stories 160x36 feet. A side track connects the factory with the railroads. Richard Miller was president of the company until 1893, in which year he sold his interests, and since that time Mr. Saiberlich has held the office. Frank Saiberlich is a son of Henry and Wilhelmina Saiberlich, natives of Germany, who came to the United States about 1854, and became pioneers of Outagamie county, where Mr. Saiberlich took up wild land, worked it with oxen, and reclaimed it for a valuable homestead. He continued operating this property until 1886, in which year he retired, and his death occurred in Appleton in 1910, his wife having passed away five years before. Both were members of the Evangelical Church, and were the parents of the following children: Minnie, living at home; E. W., secretary and treasurer of the Eagle Manufacturing Company, married Bertha Albrecht and has one child; Oscar, vice-president of the Eagle Manufacturing Company, married Anna Riesenweber and has a son and a daughter; Emma, married Henry Demand, a resident of Black Creek township, and has a family of three sons; Frank, president of the Eagle Manufacturing Company, married Frana Riesenweber, and has a family of two boys; Rosetta, married John Schwab, of Oconto Falls, and has one son; Mary, married Theo Eastman, of Oconto Falls, and has six children; Ida, married William Besserdich, of Clintonville, and died in January, 1909, leaving three children; and August and Bertha, died in infancy.

A. F. TUTTLE, president of the Tuttle Press Company, one of the largest concerns of its kind in the United States, the product of which is marketed in every state in the Union and is in such demand as to necessitate the operation of the factory night and day during a large part of the time, is known as one of Appleton's most progressive business men, and was born in Lima, New York, December 11, 1863. He is a son of H. F. and Anna C. Tuttle, who moved from New York to Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 1867, and in 1880 to Chicago. A. F. Tuttle learned the printing trade in Chicago, and in 1882 went to Elgin, Illinois, where he was first engaged in the manufacture of society goods. In about 1894 the present business was established by Mr. Tuttle, and in 1900 the firm was incorporated. Desiring more space on which to erect a larger factory, the concern moved, September 20, 1902, to the banks of the river, in Appleton, where they had a factory with 7,000 feet of floor space, but soon found this inadequate, and in August, 1906, their present factory, at Nos. 876- 886 Union street, was erected, 40,000 feet being available. A. F. Tuttle is president of the Tuttle Press Company; C. A. Kerber, vice-president, and S. A. Whedon, secretary and treasurer, and the firm has a representative in a number of states all over the country. Ninety persons are employed, steam and electric power is used, the product of the company being plain and decorated crepe paper, plain and crepe paper napkins, folding boxes and cartons, box covering papers and printed wrappers for soap, shoes, gum and bottles, printed tissue paper, milk bottle caps, labels in rolls and toilet paper. Specialties of the company include "Paris" crepe and toilet papers, and "Dr. Whedon's Carlsbad Paper Towels."

Mr. Tuttle was married in April, 1887, to Eva Ruth Peterson, of Elgin, Illinois, and they are well-known members of the Congregational Church .

ANDREW F. PETERSEN, a well-known business man of Grand Chute township, who is extensively engaged in cheesemaking, is a native of this township, born March 14, 1876, a son of John C. and Minnie (Freiberg) Petersen, the former born in Frankfort, Germany, in 1842, and the latter at Stetein, Germany, in 1849. John C. Petersen came to America when twenty-five years of age and engaged in the butcher business at Appleton for about twenty-five years, and then removed to a farm in Grand Chute township which he operated until his retirement, and then returned to Appleton, his death occurring in that city July 10, 1887. His widow still survives him and makes her home in Appleton. They were the parents of five children: Lucy, the widow of Albert Hutter, of Appleton; Emma, who married John Ross, a tailor of Appleton; John, who is engaged in butchering in that city; Louis, a farmer of Grand Chute township; and Andrew F. John C. Petersen became a prominent man in his community and was elected to various township offices and later served one term in the General Assembly .

Andrew F. Petersen attended the graded and high schools of Appleton and the Wisconsin Agricultural College, and resided with his mother until he had reached his nineteenth year, at which time he started to learn the trade of tailor. During the Spanish-American War he became a member of Company G, Second Regiment Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and in April 1898, went with that organization to Porto Rico, where he saw service until the following October. On his return to Appleton, he took up cheesemaking as an occupation, becoming connected with the old Duley Factory in Ellington township. One year later he engaged in business on his own account at the School Section Factory, and here he owns an acre of land on which is located his residence and factory. He also has seventeen acres in the farming section, most of which is timberland. Mr. Petersen devotes his entire time and attention to his business, the capacity of his factory being 10,000 pounds of milk daily, and his product being marketed in Appleton. He has shown himself possessed of much business ability, and the business has grown rapidly since he has taken charge. He is an independent Republican in his political views and has served Grand Chute township as township clerk. On April 10, 1902, Mr. Petersen was united in marriage with Lillian Wilharms, and they have had one son: Harold J., born February 11, 1903 .

HENOCK CHARLES CALIEBE, who is serving in his second term as treasurer of Grand Chute township, is one of the leading dairy farmers of this section of Outagamie county, Wisconsin. He is a native of Germany, born January 7, 1867, a son of Carl and Ernestine (Jandt) Caliebe, also natives of that place, where the father was born in 1836 or 1837 and the mother August 12, 1841. Mr. Caliebe learned the trade of mason in his native country, and after coming to this country in 1883 he followed that trade in Freedom township up to the time of his death and became the owner of a five-acre tract of land. His widow now makes her home with her son, in Center township, two miles from the old family homestead. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Caliebe, namely: one who died in infancy; Henock Charles; John, a resident of Center township, where he is engaged in farming and mason contracting; Hugo and Ando, who are deceased; and William, who is engaged in cultivating his brother's land in Center township .

Henock Charles Caliebe attended school in Germany and one year in a private school, and at the age of sixteen years began working as a farm hand at eight dollars per month in Freedom township. After five years at this kind of labor, he was married, and for a time worked the farm of his father-in-law, at whose death he became the owner, and continued to conduct this property until 1902, in which year he settled on his present farm. This excellent eighty-acre tract is operated as a dairy farm, and a fine herd of cattle are pastured here. He has been twice elected township treasurer, is treasurer for the School Road Cheese Factory, and is salesman for the latter concern. He is an independent Republican in his political belief, and is a member of St. Paul's Lutheran Church.

On April 2, 1888, Mr. Caliebe was united in marriage to Augusta Wege, who was born in Germany, June 16, 1866, daughter of Louis and Justine (Kolene) Wege, natives of Germany, where the father was born January 4, 1818, and the mother January 4, 1826. They came to America in 1868, locating in Freedom township, where until fall Mr. Wege was engaged in working for others. He then bought eighteen acres of land, to which he later added eighty acres, and here he remained until his death, January 1, 1893, Mrs. Wege having passed away August 2, 1888. They were the parents of eight children, of whom two are now living: Mrs. Caliebe and Bertha, the wife of Louis Schroeder, a retired farmer of Appleton, residing at Second, between Morrison and Durkee streets. Mr. and Mrs. Caliebe have had seven children: Emma, born June 13, 1889, who married Henry Verkuehlen, a cement worker residing with Mr. and Mrs. Caliebe; George, born December 16, 1890, a farmer of South Dakota; Matilda, born December 27, 1892; Rosie; born November 12, 1894; Frederick, born September 24, 1897; Leonard, born November 9, 1901; and Gertrude, born December 8, 1903. Mr. Caliebe is also rearing his brother's child, Esther, whose mother died when she was nine days old. Esther was born September 3, 1904 .

HENRY LADHOLZ, the owner of an excellent farm of eighty acres in Grand Chute township, was born September 29, 1869, in Stettin township, Marathon county, Wisconsin, and is a son of George and Minnie (Yeathes) Ladholz, natives of Germany. George Ladholz was born January 16, 1824, and came to the United States as a young man, settling in Stettin township, Marathon county, Wisconsin, on the farm on which Henry Ladholz was born, a wild tract of 240 acres on which no improvements had been made. The nearest markets were Wausau and Stevens Point, and the necessary family provisions had to be carried from that point to the homestead farm. There Mr. Ladholz resided until his death in 1897, his wife, who was born July 22, 1842, dying in 1895. They were the parents of nine children, Henry being the fifth in order of birth. He attended school in Marathon county, near the old home, and worked for his father until he was twenty-five years of age, with the exception of a short time when he worked out among the farmers of that vicinity. In 1894 he took charge of the Stettin township farm and conducted it for fifteen years, but at the end of that time he sold out and purchased his present eighty-acre tract in Grand Chute, a finely cultivated tract which is equipped with modern substantial buildings and fine fencing, and is supplied with good water facilities. Mr. Ladholz is engaged in general farming and dairying, and his efforts along these lines have met with gratifying success. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and in political matters is an independent Republican, although he has never aspired to political office, preferring to give his time and attention to the work of his farm .

On July 26, 1898, Mr. Ladholz was united in marriage with Minnie Yeathes, who was born in Germany, October 2, 1876, daughter of August and Amelia (Koepke) Yeathes, natives of Germany, who came to America in 1890 and located near Wausau, where Mrs. Yeathes still survives. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Ladholz: Anna, born May 14, 1899; Elsie, born June 3, 1901; Frank, born September 8, 1903; Herman, born April 11, 1907; and Bennie, born June 25, 1910 .

GEORGE W. PUTNEY, one of the prosperous business men of Appleton, who has been prominently identified with the oil and agricultural interests of this section of Outagamie county for some years, is a native of New York, born near Kingston, April 4, 1837, a son of Alpha and Eunice (Braman) Putney. Alpha Putney was born in Massachusetts and was descended from the Putneys of Putney Commons, England, who came from that point to America in the Mayflower. In young manhood he emigrated to New York State, where he was married, and there became a prominent contractor. His wife died in 1844, in New Y'ork, and he came to the west, to Oconomowoc, afterward locating in Grand Chute township, where he became a land owner and continued to reside for about thirty-three years, when he returned to New York State, locating at Cazenovia, Madison county, and there his death occurred. Mr. and Mrs. Putney had a family of six children, and of these George W. was the fourth in order of birth. He attended school in New York and in Grand Chute township, and started to work for himself as a chore boy when he was only seven years of age. He engaged in buying and selling stock when most lads are thinking about their games, and when he was only sixteen years old bought a farm near Stevens Point, Portage county, Wisconsin, but soon sold eighty acres of it and traded the other eighty acres for a house and lot on State street, Appleton, which he still owns. He continued to add to his real estate holdings until he was the possessor of 214 acres almost adjoining Appleton, but recently he has sold seventy-eight acres. Of the remainder, thirty-three acres are located within the city limits of Appleton. He has never operated this land himself, preferring to hire help, or to rent the land on shares, and most of his attention is given to the stock business, in which he has been engaged since his youth. He is vice-president of the Minnehaha Oil Company, in which he is a heavy stockholder, is a director of the Copper Belt Mining Company, owning more than 40,000 shares of stock, and just disposed of his large holdings in the Appleton Osage Oil Company, at an enormous profit. He is independent in politics, and has never aspired to office, and is not connected with any fraternal organizations .

Mr. Putney was married (first) to Miss Susan Perry, a native of Greenville township, Outagamie county, and to this union there were born these children: Fred, who resides on a fruit farm west of Fond du Lac; Lester, who is engaged in farming in North Dakota; Cora, who married Harry Lee, station agent at Appleton. Mr. Putney was married (second) October 9, 1895, to Miss Dollie Martin, who was born at Stevens Point, Wisconsin, February 2, 1858, daughter of Hiram B. and Hannah E. (Conklin) Martin. Mr. Martin was born March 12, 1818, near Dunkirk, New York, and his wife December 25, 1821, in Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania. During his early life Mr. Martin was a lumber dealer, and when nineteen years of age went to Rockford, Illinois, but after a, short time removed to Portage county, Wisconsin. He engaged in the lumber business at Wausau for some time and then removed to St. Louis, Missouri, but after five years returned to Portage county and located at Stevens Point. There he engaged in the drug business for about twenty-one years, at the end of which time he retired, and his death occurred there March 9, 1891, his wife having passed away May 5, 1884. They were the parents of five children, Mrs. Putney being the fourth in order of birth. Mr. and Mrs. Putney have had one child: Charles E., born March 19, 1900, who is attending the Fifth Ward School in Appleton .

AUGUST KLITZKE, who has been a resident of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, for many years, is one of the self-made men of this section, and is the owner of a fine property in Grand Chute township. Mr. Klitzke was born in Germany, April 5, 1864, a son of Charles and Frances (Strey) Klitzke, natives of that place. The family came to the United States in 1880, first locating for six months at Neenah, where Mr. Klitzke, the father, worked for others, and then moved to Ellington township, which Charles Klitzke worked for twelve years and then sold to his son August. Mrs. Klitzke had died in Ellington township, and the father moved to Appleton, since when he has lived retired. Five children were born to Charles and Frances Klitzke: Herman, who is residing on the old homestead in Ellington township; Minnie, the wife of August Maas, of Grand Chute township; August; William, who resides in Ellington; and Bertha, who married Gustave Lang, an engineer in the Appleton paper mills .

August Klitzke received his education in the schools of his native country, and was about seventeen years old when he came to America, at which time he could understand no English. He was quick to learn, however, and during the eleven years following he worked out among the farmers of his vicinity, and on the home farm of his father, in Ellington township, which he bought at the time of his marriage. There he resided for about nine years, making numerous improvements, at which time he rented it out for five years and moved to the farm which he now occupies, and which he bought two years later. He has forty-eight acres in this tract, and twenty-five and ten-acre tracts in the same section, and here he has carried on agricultural operations to the present time, meeting with gratifying success. He carries on general farming and dairying, and is considered one of Grand Chute township's good, practical farmers .

On March 28, 1892, Mr. Klitzke was married to Martha Raub, who was born in Germany, in 1871, daughter of Christian Raub, who came to America in 1872 and became a landowner in Center township, where he still resides. There were no children born to this union. Mr. Klitzke was married (second) March 23, 1901, to Mrs. Amelia Kuehne, who was born March 26, 1867, in Germany, daughter of William and Amelia (Hartwig) Harting, natives of the Fatherland. They came to America in 1868, and settled first in Greenville, but later moved to Appleton, where the father worked at farming and in railroad construction work until his death in 1898. Mrs. Harting still survives her husband and makes her home in Appleton. Mrs. Klitzke was first married to Ewald Kuehne, a native of Outagamie county, who is now deceased. They had three children: Loretta, born June, 6, 1889, single, and residing, at home; Marie, born May 3, 1892; and Mabel, born November 23, 1894. Mr. and Mrs. Klitzke have also had three children: Harvey, born May 17, 1902; Irene, August 9, 1904; and Walter, November 26, 1907. The family are members of the Lutheran Church of Appleton, and in political matters Mr. Klitzke is an independent Republican .

WILLIAM A. FRAHM, who has been carrying on agricultural pursuits in Grand Chute township for the past twelve years, is the owner of eighty acres of land here, and is one of the township's good, practical farmers. He was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, July 22, 1875, a son of John and Sophia (Krell) Frahm, natives of the Fatherland, where John Frahm was born January 6, 1861, and his wife on March 21st of the same year. They were married in Germany, and came to the United States in 1884, landing in New York City, from whence they came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, locating near Seymour. There Mr. Frahm was engaged in working for others for one and one-half years, and then moved to Center township, where he was engaged in the same occupation for six and one-half years, at the end of which time he purchased a farm and continued to operate it during the twelve years following. He then bought the old Montgomery farm in Grand Chute township, where he resided until the spring of 1910, when he sold out and moved to Appleton, where he and his wife are now living retired. They have been the parents of five children, namely: Fred, who is a farmer of Center township; William A.; Herman, an agriculturist of Grand Chute township, and two who are deceased. John Frahm served in the regular army in Germany, and saw service during the Franco-Prussian War in 1870-71 .

William A. Frahm attended school in Germany for about three months, and after coming to this country attended the English schools until he was twelve years of age, at which time he began working for the farmers in the vicinity of his father's farm. When he was eighteen years of age he went out on the road as traveling salesman for the nursery firm of Chase Brothers, Rochester, New York, and continued in that line until he had reached his twenty-fourth year, at which time he took up a forty-acre tract in Black Creek township, which he had purchased two years previous to this time. After one year there he removed to the farm which he now occupies, and one and one-half years later sold the Black Creek property. He now owns forty acres of finely-cultivated land in Grand Chute township, as well as forty acres of low land, and is carrying on extensive farming operations and devoting a great deal of attention to the raising of fine cattle. He is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Lutheran Church .

On April 20, 1899, Mr. Frahm was united in marriage with Elizabeth Torborg, who was born in Hanover, Germany, December 24, 1876, daughter of Deidrich and Katharine (Junge) Torborg, the former born December 23, 1853, and the latter November 3, 1855, both in Hanover. They came to America in 1879, and immediately located in Appleton, Wisconsin, where Mr. Torborg, was employed in the paper mills until 1898. From that year until 1910 Mr. Torborg was engaged in farming, and Mr. Torborg is now employed at the Eagle Manufacturing Company's plant at Appleton. He and his wife had eight children, of whom four are living, namely: Mrs. Frahm; Margaret, who married Louis Henkel, a pipefitter of Appleton; Anna, the widow of Anton Henkel, residing with her parents; and Emma, the wife of Otto Meyer, a farmer of Cicero township. Mr. and Mrs. Frahm have three children: Erma E., born April 30, 1900; Anna Katharine, born December 20, 1904; and Florence, born April 16, 1908 .

WISCONSIN TISSUE PAPER COMPANY. One of the large manufacturing companies of Appleton, Wisconsin, is the Wisconsin Tissue Paper Company, which was organized under the State laws in 1898 for the manufacture of tissue and light weight paper. This concern was founded by Lamar Olmstead, president, and William Gerbrick, and during the same year was incorporated, and the officers at the present time are Lamar Olmstead, president; M. A. Wertheimer, vice-president; C. W. Stribley, treasurer; J. E. Thomas, secretary, and J. J. Herb, superintendent. The company uses two machines, producing ten tons of tissue and light weight wrapping paper for wrapping fruit, paper napkins, toilet, etc., and employs forty-five men, the product being sold all over the United States. The buildings of the concern, which have been erected from time to time as the increase in business demanded more space, are in dimension as follows: One story and basement, 100x70 feet; two story and basement, 107x64 feet; and one story and basement, 64x32 feet; boiler house, 30x40 feet; two story and basement, 32x42 feet, in addition to the company office. A side-track furnishes rapid communication to the railroads and insures a speedy means of transportation. The company uses 350 horsepower in operating this plant, and the old method of water power has been supplanted almost entirely by steam and electricity .

Joseph Thomas, secretary of this concern, and one of the well known men of the Wisconsin paper trade, was born in Michigan in 1872, a son of Joseph C. and Mary A. Thomas, the former of whom was interested in mining enterprises. Mr. Thomas came to Appleton in 1890 and attended Lawrence University and a business college, after which he entered the employ of the Kaukauna Fiber Company, as stenographer. At the time of the organization of the Pulp Wood Company, he became stenographer and bookkeeper, and continued with this firm until 1895, when he went to Nekoosa, Wisconsin, and until 1904 was connected with the Nekoosa Paper Company. In the latter year he returned to Appleton to accept the position of manager and secretary of the Wisconsin Tissue Paper Company, with which firm he has since been connected. In 1900, Mr. Thomas was married to Lela Treat, of Grand Rapids, Wisconsin, and they have three children. Mr. Thomas is a member of the Masons and the Elks .

WILLIAM McLEISH, a well-known business man of Appleton, Wisconsin, who is president of the Appleton Car-Mover Company, manufacturers of coal dealers' supplies and modern coal yard equipment, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1837, and is a son of William and Elizabeth (Van Alstine) McLeish, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of New York. Mr. McLeish's father was a patternmaker by trade and for some years operated a foundry and machine shop at Cleveland, Ohio, in partnership with another business man, but prior to his death returned to Scotland on a visit and died there. William MeLeish received his education in the public and private schools of Cleveland, Ohio, and for fifteen years conducted a farm in New York, which his father purchased after retiring from his foundry business. Later William McLeish purchased a farm in Minnesota, which he operated for several years, and then engaged in the photography business, having two galleries at St. Paul, engaging in traveling and later manufacturing dry plates for photographers at Des Moines, Iowa. He came to Appleton in 1885 as a photographer, and later became a bookkeeper for a hardware firm, but in November, 1900, he organized the Appleton Car-Mover Company, with E. M. Wright, R. Miller and Archie Shannon. Later Messrs. Shannon and Miller sold out, and the interest of Mr. W'right was purchased by Mr. E. C. Allen, who met an accidental death in New York, in 1907, since which time Mr. MeLeish has conducted the business alone, although Mrs. Allen retained her husband's interest. The company's goods, which are known and sold all over the world, consist of chutes, chute elevators, house shields, sheet steel, coal baggers, bagging screens, combination yard and car screens, pocket screens, wire cloth, rotary screens, coal bags canvas steel and galvanized steel baskets, waterproof horse covers, Atlas car movers, push brooms, wagon signs, steel wheelbarrows, car wrenches, scoops, forks, coal elevators and conveyors, and, in fact any and every article that is in demand by coal dealers, many of these articles being covered by special patents controlled by the company. Years of experience in this line have made each article a perfect type of modern coal yard equipment, and by selling direct to the customer the company is able to sell superior goods as low as many of their competitors' inferior goods .

Mr. McLeish was married to Miss Laura A. Lacy, of New York, and they have had four children: William F., who is engaged in the sheep business in Montana; Fred H., who also carries on that line of business near Spokane, Washington; Arthur E., who resides at Fort Benton, Montana; and Ida Belle, who married C. H. Ragland and resides in Montana. Mr. McLeish is a member of the Congregational Church. He is fraternally connected with the Masons, belonging to the Blue Lodge, Chapter and Commandery and Eastern Star; and also holds membership in the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Woodmen of America .

JOHN ALLEN BOON, who was born in New York, April 28, 1850 and died May 7, 1901, in Appleton, Wisconsin, was a son of George W. and Charlotte A. (Smith) Boon, natives of New York who came to Wisconsin in 1851, the journey being made by boat to Milwaukee, and thence by wagon on to Omro. The family spent a few months at that point, after which they removed to Outagamie county, and located in Greenville township, at a time when the country was all covered with timber, wild game abounded and Indians still lurked in the territory. Experiencing all of the hardships and privations of the early pioneers, George W. Boon cleared up his farm from the wilderness, and succeeded in converting it into a fertile, productive property, on which he lived until his death, January 2, 1898. Mr. Boon had eight children, two by a former wife: Mrs. Lois Johnson, a resident of Washington; Mrs. Sarah Rose, of Oshkosh, Wisconsin; Francis, of Shawano, Wisconsin; John A.; Mrs. Josephine H. Lent, a resident of California: Mrs. Henrietta Clark, of Spokane, Washington; Mrs. Mary Nichols of Seymour, Wisconsin; and Marion G., who died in infancy. John A. Boon received his early education in the schools of Outagamie county, and grew up on his father's farm in Greenville township, his boyhood being spent much the same as that of other farmers' boys in his section. He helped to clear the property, and as soon as he was able started to do his share of cultivating the farm, on which he lived until his death, after which it was sold by his widow, who now lives retired in Appleton. Mr. Boon's father was a member of the LeRoy Cavalry (Home Guards) in 1843, in Jefferson county, New York, and was always interested in military matters, but at the time of the outbreak of the Civil War, ill health caused his rejection as a soldier in the Union army, although he attempted to enlist. On March 29, 1879, John A. Boon was married to Wilma E. Diener, daughter of Henry J. and Anna B. Diener, now living retired in Appleton, and three children were born to this union: Leonard F. a graduate of the State University, and now engaged in civil engineering at Madison, Wisconsin; Marian E., who married Herman F. Schroeder, manager of a 1,200-acre farm at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin, has one daughter, Lillian; and Henry G., who is attending Lawrence University .

F. G. WALKER, who during the past ten years has been engaged in the drug business at No. 932 College avenue, Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in Grant county, Wisconsin, in 1863, a son of William and Emma Walker. William Walker, who was a farmer by occupation, came from Ireland, and his wife was a native of England, both coming to this country as pioneers, and settling in Grant county, where William Walker was engaged in agricultural pursuits for a long period. F. G. Walker received a public and Normal school education, and his first employment was as a drug clerk in a store at Monroe, Wisconsin. Later he was in stores in Plattville and Baraboo, and in 1901 he came to Appleton and opened his present place of business at No. 932 College avenue, where he has since been located. Mr. Walker conducts a first-class establishment, carrying a full and up-to-date line of drugs, candies, cigars, toilet articles and stationery. Prescriptions are carefully compounded. Mr. Walker has devoted himself too closely to his business to have engaged in politics in any degree, but he is careful in casting his vote, which he gives to the man whose record stands for the best city government, irrespeictive of party lines. His fraternal connections are with the Eagles and the Equitable Fraternal Union. In 1905 Mr. Walker was married to Miss Mary E. Witham, of Appleton, and they have had one child .

NICHOLAS C. SCHOMMER, who is the owner of the largest and only exclusive undertaking establishment in Appleton, Wisconsin, has been connected with that business in this city for many years. He is a native of Chicago, Illinois, born November 16, 1857, a son of Peter and Mary (Bonert) Schommer, the former a deceased wagon maker, and the latter a resident of Chicago. Nicholas C. Schommer attended the parochial schools in Chicago, and began working in a furniture factory when he was fourteen years of age. In 1885 he came to Appleton to engage in the same line of business with his father-in-law, M. Bedessem, with whom he continued for over thirteen years, and in September, 1897, he embarked in business for himself, as a furniture dealer and undertaker. This business was continued until 1907, at which time the furniture department of the business was dropped, and Mr. Schommer since that time has given his whole attention to undertaking. He has the finest equipped establishment in Appleton, and he is assisted by a corps of experienced employes. Mr. Schommer was married in 1884 to Catherine Bedessem, of Appleton, daughter of M. and Barbara (Bain) Bedessem, who came to Appleton in 1883 from Kenosha, Wisconsin, and twelve children have been born to this union, of whom nine now survive. Mr. Schommer and his family are consistent members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, and he is connected with the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin, St. Joseph's Society, the Equitable Fraternal Union, and the Elks. His assistance may always be counted upon when movements beneficial in a public way are contemplated .

JULIUS E. BECKER, who during a period covering sixteen years, was engaged in business in Appleton under the company name of the Appleton Plow Works, was born in Germany, June 2, 1864, and died February 4, 1910. He was a son of William and Hannah Becker, who came to the United States with their family in 1869, locating at Milwaukee, where both spent the remainder of their lives. Julius E. Becker secured his education in the public and parochial schools of Milwaukee, and his first employment was as a clerk in a grocery store in that city. In 1894 he came to Appleton and established the Appleton Plow Works, which he conducted with much success to the time of his death. Prior to locating in Appleton he had been in the same line of business at Menasha, from 1887 until 1894, but decided there were better opportunities in his line of business to be found in Appleton, and accordingly removed his plant to this city. In 1891 Mr. Becker was united in marriage with Bertha Stern, who was born in Greenville, Wisconsin, daughter of Fred and Emily (Becker) Stern, natives of the Fatherland, who came to the United States in 1862, and located in Outagamie county, where Mr. Stern was engaged in farming for many years. He is now living retired in Appleton. Mr. and Mrs. Becker had a family of eight children, namely: Luella, Louise, Alma, George, Edna, Julius, Jr., Clara and Lydia, of whom George, and Julius are deceased. Mr. Becker was a faithful member of St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, to which his widow and children also belong .

R. S. TALBOT, president of the Fiber Development Company, engineers and experts in paper manufacturing, including water, steam and electrical power development plants, was born in England in 1870, and is a son of William and Jane (Stowell) Talbot, the former of whom is deceased, while the latter still lives in England. Mr. Talbot received his education in his native country, and in 1889 graduated from Kingswood College, Bath, Somersetshire. In 1890 Mr. Talbot came to the United States, locating first at Bangor, Maine, where he became connected with the engineering department of Hinckley & Egery, an association which lasted for two years. During the next three years he was employed in the construction work of the Howland Pulp Company, at Howland, Maine, and during the last year was in charge of the manufacturing department. At this time the New England Sulphite Digester Department was organized, and Mr. Talbot was secured by this company to assist in planning the J. S. Rodgers Company's sulphite mill at Ausable Forks, New York, the sulphite mills of the Glens Falls Pulp and Paper Company at Fort Edward, New York, and the changing of the soda mill at Lincoln, Maine, into the sulphite mills known as the Katahdin Pulp and Paper Company. Mr. Talbot eventually took charge of this concern, of which he was manager until 1897, in which year he began doing special work for mills now associated with the International Paper Company. During the fall of 1899 Mr. Talbot came to Appleton, where he was associated with the Kimberly-Clark Company, later taking charge of their sulphite mills, and he continued to be connected with this large concern until 1908. In October, 1908, the Fiber Development Company was organized, with Mr. Talbot as president; E. A. Morse, treasurer; E. A. Edmonds, vice-president, and E. A. Peterson, secretary; while the present officers are Messrs. Talbot and Morse. This concern has prepared plans for the new mills and additions to the Wausau Paper Mills at Brokaw, Wisconsin; has done important work for the water powers on the Wisconsin and Wolf Rivers, as well as the Fox River, and at present is engaged on plans for the Lakeside Paper Company at Menasha, Wisconsin, is preparing plans and specifications for the building of a steam turbine and electric plant for the Rhinelander Paper Mills, at Rhinelander, Wisconsin, also a two-machine paper mill for the same firm, and is also preparing plans for the remodeling of the mills of the Itasca Paper Company, at Grand Rapids, Minnesota, including the erection of a 1,000 horsepower steam and electrical plant for this company .

Mr. Talbot was married in 1894 to Miss Myra Weatherbee, of Lincoln, Maine, and they have had a family of six sons and three daughters. They are members of the Congregational Church, and Mr. Talbot is connected with the Masonic fraternity, belonging to the Appleton Commandery, Knights Templar .

HENRY N. MARX, who is well known in the jewelry trade in Wisconsin, is the owner of a modern establishment situated at Appleton. He was born in Calumet county, Wisconsin, December 26, 1879, and is a son of Joseph and Mary (Kline) Marx, the former a native of Germany, and the latter of Wisconsin. As a young man Joseph Marx came to the United States, and was engaged in farming in Calumet county until his removal to Winnebago county in 1891, and he and Mrs. Marx are now living in the city of Menasha. They had a family of eleven children, nine boys and two girls, and all are still living. Henry N. Marx received his education in the public schools and the parochial school at Menasha, in which city he learned the trade of jeweler, working for C. R. Kiel for about ten months. He then came to Appleton, and during the next ten years was engaged in business here, eight years being spent with H. A. Kamps Company, Mr. Marx having an interest in the business. In August, 1910, he opened his present store here, and now carries a full line of jewelry and supplies, and also does high class repairing. 'His store is situated at No. 738 College avenue, and he has built up an excellent trade. On May 21, 1907, Mr. Marx was united in marriage with Miss Mary Margaret Stier, a daughter of Joseph and Margaret Stier, and they have had a son and a daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Marx are members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, anrd Mr. Marx is connected with the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Order of Foresters and St. Joseph's Society .

JOHN KEARN, a practical agriculturist and cattle raiser of Grand Chute township, and the owner of an excellent farm of thirty-seven and one-half acres adjoining the city of Appleton, Wisconsin, was born in the Fourth Ward, Appleton, January 29, 1873, the only child of his parents. His father is now deceased, and his mother is now the wife of Charles Glasnaf, of Grand Chute township. Mr. Kearn attended the district schools of Grand Chute township and a night school at Appleton, and was but thirteen years of age when he started working in the woolen mill at Appleton, where he remained two years. Later he was employed in the paper mills for two years, and on his mother's farm for a like period, at which time he went to Kimberly and secured work on the straw press for two years, subsequently entering the paper mill at that place. At this time Mr. Kearn was taken sick, and he returned home for eighteen months, after which he was again employed in the paper mill for one year, and then went to Appleton and secured employment in the Fox River Paper Company's mills, tending a machine there for eight years. About six months later he bought the farm which he now owns, a well-cultivated tract of thirty-seven and one-half acres adjoining the city limits of Appleton, where he specializes in cabbages. He has a storehouse with a capacity of 100 tons and an excellent silo, of cement, built in 1908, and the farm, taken all in all, is one of the best-equipped in this part of the township. He devotes most of his time to farming, but lately has given a great deal of attention to the breeding of thoroughbred Holstein cattle .

Mr. Kearn'was married in November, 1900, to Minnie Koehnke, who was born at Manitowoc, Wisconsin, in 1869, daughter of Ulrich and Recka (Witt) Koehnke, natives of Germany, who became residents of Greenville township, Outagamie county, where both died.

JOHN VANDERVELDEN, who is now engaged in tilling the soil on a fine farm of sixty acres located in Grand Chute township, was born on the farm on which he now resides, February 26, 1877, and is a son of Martin and Harriet (Joosten) Vandervelden, the former born in Holland, and the latter in Grand Chute township, on a farm situated one mile north from that owned by John Vandervelden. Martin Vandervelden came to this country when he was eleven years old, with his parents, the family locating on the present Vandervelden farm, where Martin Vandervelden grew to maturity, became the owner of the land and, cultivated it until his retirement in 1908, when he removed to the village of Little Chute. He and his wife had a family of fourteen children, as follows: Georgina, the wife of Theodore Van Oudenhoven, a farmer of North Dakota; Johnnie, who is deceased; Christian, an employe of the Kimberly paper mills; Frank, a fireman of Kimberly; Mary, who married Peter Wellenberg, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Nettie, who married Arnold VanHamond, a resident of Little Chute; Peter, a pipe fitter of Kimberly; Martin, residing with his father; George and Joseph, twins, the latter deceased, and the former a resident of Little Chute, and a millwright by trade; Henry and Tony, employes of the paper mill, residing with their parents; and Simon, who is deceased. John Vandervelden attended the district schools of Grand Chute township, and the village school of Little Chute, and from the time that he was thirteen years of age until he was twenty-one he worked as an employe of the paper mill and as a farm hand. When he had attained his majority he went to the Kimberly mills, where he became beeter engineer, a position which he held until July, 1906, at which time he went to North Dakota and took up a homestead of 160 acres, residing thereon for eighteen months, proving up his claim. On his return, he worked on his father's farm for one year, and then returned to North Dakota for two months, at which time he located in Kimberly and was employed as a pipe fitter in the mill. During the latter part of November, 1911, Mr. Vandervelden returned to the old homestead, where he has since been engaged in general farming. Mr. Vandervelden is independent in his political views. He is a member of the Roman Catholic Church and is connected with the Catholic Order of Foresters, as are his brothers .

On January 23, 1900, Mr. Vandervelden was married to Dina Goemans, who was born March 13, 1882, in Grand Chute township, daughter of George and Johanah (Searmans) Goemans, the former born in 1824, and the latter August 24, 1836, both in Holland. They came to America in 1867, on May 28th of which year they located on a farm in Little Chute, where Mr. Goemans spent the remainder of his life, dying in 1894. His widow now makes her home with her children. Mr. and Mrs. Vandervelden have had five children: Harriet, Marie, George, Josephine, and one child who died in infancy.

WILLIAM G. BAUMANN, one of the progressive young agriculturists of Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, has lived on the farm on which he is now operating all of his life, having been born here June 26, 1880, a son of William and Mary (Hocks) Baumann, natives of Germany. William Baumann was born on the Rhine, February 7, 1843, and his wife May 22, 1843, and they were married in Germany, coming to America in 1875 and settling in Appleton for three months, at the end of which time Mr. Baumann bought the farm on which William G. Baumann now resides. He continued to cultivate this land until 1909, when he moved to Menasha, and there Mrs. Baumann died August 24, 1910, when he came back to the old homestead, and now makes his home here. Mr. Baumann is a veteran of the Franco-Prussian War. He and his wife had the following children: Margaret, wife of John Hermann, a farmer of Clayton township, Winnebago county; William G., and Henry, twin of William G., also a farmer of Winnebago county. William G. Baumann attended the district schools until nine years of age and then went to St. Joseph's School for two years, after which he completed his education in his home district. He has never left the old homestead, and since his marriage has been operating it as a general farm. The eighty acres in the property are in a fine state of cultivation, and the farm is fully equipped with modern buildings and up-to-date machinery and appliances. Mr. Baumann is one of the progressive young men of his locality, and is now serving as pathmaster here. In political matters he adheres to the principles of the Democratic party, and his religious connection is with St. Joseph's Catholic Church .

On April 27, 1909, Mr. Baumann was married to Anna Katherine Ellenbecker, who was born in Center township, December 30, 1879, daughter of Nicholas and Mary (Tock) Ellenbecker, natives of Belgium, the former born February 15, 1845, and the latter July 26, 1842. Mr. Ellenbecker came to Outagamie county in 1862, and his wife in 1869, and they were married in Appleton, after which Mr. Ellenbecker bought eighty acres of land in Center township, which he cultivated until 1906, in which year he rented his land to his son and moved to Appleton, where he now lives retired. From time to time he added to his property and the farm now contains 200 acres, all under cultivation. Mr. and Mrs. Ellenbecker had seven children: Anthony, who resides on the old homestead; John, who is deceased; Rosie, the wife of John Butler, a resident of Appleton; Sophia, the wife of John Graisbach, of Center township; William, who is deceased; Mrs. Baumann; and Hubert, a resident of Center township. Mr. and Mrs. Baumann have had one child: Mildred Mary, born April 17, 1910 .

JOHN MERITY, one of the substantial citizens and property owners of Grand Chute township, who is devoting his attention to the cultivation of a magnificent farm of 173 acres, where he also is extensively engaged in stock raising, was born in Center township, Outagamie county, Wisconsin, May 31, 1861, and is a son of Owen and Mary (McDonald) Merity, natives of County Cavan, Ireland, where the father was born June 1, 1819, and the mother about 1834. The father came from Ireland in 1850, and landed at New York, from whence he went three months later to New Haven, Connecticut, where he was married, and in 1857 went to West Peoria, Illinois. After spending a short period there he came to Outagamie county, Wisconsin, and located in Center township, purchasing eighty acres of farming land, which he operated until 1866. He then came to Grand Chute township, where he purchased a farm of 215 acres in Section No. 1, and here continued to engage in general farming until his death, which occurred April 1, 1910, his wife's death occurred December 4, 1902. Mr. Merity was one of the prominent citizens of his day. He and his wife had the following children: Mary, widow of John Crowe, a retired citizen of Appleton; Peter, who is retired and lives in Appleton; John; Frances, who married Herman Bauer, retired and living in Appleton; Ellen, the wife of T. H. Warren, a grocer of Appleton; Margaret, the wife of Nicholas Paltzer, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Julia, who is single and resides on the old homestead; Katherine, who is deceased; and one child, which died in infancy .

John Merity attended school in District No. 6, Grand Chute township, and his farming operations have been confined to the property which he now occupies. With his brother he conducted the farm until the death of his father, after which he bought the interests of the other heirs, and he now has 173 acres under cultivation, having disposed of forty acres. He engages in general farming and stockraising, and now has sixty-five head of cattle, which he is fattening for the market. In addition Mr. Merity is the owner of a fine sixteen-acre fruit farm in the state of Washington. Mr. Merity is a Democrat in politics and has served as township clerk and assessor, refusing other offices because his manifold duties on the farm would not permit of his giving them sufficient attention. Like his father he has been a total abstainer all of his life. His religious connection is with the Roman Catholic Church, and he holds membership in the Knights of Columbus.

WILLIAM F. ZIMMERMAN, who owns and operates a well-cultivated dairy and vegetable farm of thirty acres, located in Grand Chute township, was born June 9, 1877, in Oconomowoc township, Waukesha county, Wisconsin, a son of John D. and Minnie (Kiehnbaum) Zimmerman. Mr. Zimmerman's parents were natives of Germany, his father being born August 16, 1832, and his mother November 25, 1844. John D. Zimmerman came to America in 1857 and located in Oconomowoc township with but five dollars in his pocket, and this money was used to buy clothing. However, he was willing and ready to work, and soon found employment among the farmers, for whom he continued to farm until enlisting in the Union army, as a private of Company C, Twenty-eighth Regiment, Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry. He served with that regiment three years and one month, being advanced to the rank of corporal, and was wounded in battle -- the first man that got wounded at Spanish Fort, Alabama -- but only remained in the hospital a short time. After making a war record that would have done credit to any man, he was honorably discharged and was mustered out at Madison, immediately after which he returned to Oconomowoc and again became a farm hand. About one year later Mr. Zimmerman was married, and he then purchased a farm in Oconomowoc township, on which he resided until 1907, when he retired from business cares and went to Appleton to spend the rest of his years enjoying the fruits of his early labors. He and his wife had a family of seven children: Mary Elizabeth, single, who resides with her parents; Henry W., a farmer of Benchland, Montana; Eda, wife of Grant Powell, a carpenter of No. 772 Pacific street, Appleton; Herman, a farmer of Barron county, Wisconsin; William F.; and John and Daniel, deceased .

William F. Zimmerman attended the district and high schools of Oconomowoc, and worked for his father until he had reached the age of twenty-one years. One year prior to his marriage he purchased the farm on which he now resides, and he has lived here ever since. He devotes the thirty acres to vegetable raising and dairy farming, and success has attended his earnest efforts. Mr. Zimmerman has taken quite an active interest in Republican politics, and while a resident of Oconomowoc township served as township clerk . He and Mrs. Zimmerman are members of the Appleton Methodist Episcopal Church.

On April 3, 1907, Mr. Zimmerman was united in marriage with Miss Belle Peebles, who was born in Oconomowoc township, May 16, 1882, daughter of William and Julia (Campbell) Peebles, natives of Waukesha county, the father born May 29, 1860, and the mother September 19, 1865. Mr. Peebles has always been engaged in farming in Oconomowoc township, where he now owns a 200-acre property, and he has held various township offices. Eight children have been born to him and his wife, as follows: Mrs. Zimmerman; Sumner (deceased); John and Percy, residing at home; and Pearl, Grace, Ruth and Robert, who also reside with their parents. Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman have had two children: Leone Marie, born December 26, 1908, and Lawrence William, born April 11, 1910 .

EARL D. RALPH. Among the representative citizens and skilled agriculturists of Outagamie county, Wisconsin, may be mentioned Earl D. Ralph, a farmer of Grand Chute township, who has a fine property of eighty acres, on which he makes a specialty of dairy farming. Mr. Ralph was born September 26, 1872, at Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, and is a son of Benjamin A. and Mary (DeVolls) Ralph, the former born at Warren, Vermont, in 1845, and the latter in Stow, Massachusetts, in 1847. As a young man Benjamin Ralph was a farmer, and he grew to manhood on a farm near Fort Atkinson, whence his parents had come when he was a child. For some time he was employed as a clerk in his brother's general store, and later he embarked in the business on his own account, continuing therein for about ten years, when he sold his mercantile interests and moved to a small farm, on which he is now engaged in gardening and raising fruit. He was twice married, having eight children by his first marriage and five children by the second, and Earl D. is the oldest of the children by his first wife. Earl D. Ralph attended school at Fort Atkinson, and as a youth worked on his father's farm, which he began working on shares when he was twenty-one years old., After continuing thus for twelve years he continued working for his father for two years more, and then went to Packwaukee, Marquette county, where he operated a farm of 200 acres for a Mr. Priest, but on account of failing health had to give up this position after one year and four months. Returning to this county, he bought his present farm of eighty acres, which he has devoted principally to dairy farming, and he now has a fine herd of registered Jersey cattle. Mr. Ralph is a Prohibitionist, and has been active in the cause of Temperance. His religious connection is with the Congregational Church .

On March 21, 1910, Mr. Ralph was married to Alice Miles, who was born near Packwaukee, Wisconsin, December 25, 1872, daughter of Mark and Ann H. (Whitson) Miles, the former born in Ohio, December 11, 1839, and the latter on Long Island, New York, February 9, 1839. Mr. Miles came to Wisconsin about 1852 or 1853. He enlisted in the Civil War in a Wisconsin regiment. He returned from the war just before his first wife died. No children were born to his first marriage. He lived at Wausau, Oshkosh and Richford before locating at Packwaukee. He then went to Thayer county, Nebraska, where he met his death by being struck by lightning in 1881. The year following his widow and her two children came back to Packwaukee, where Mrs. Miles died February 6, 1910 .

WILLIAM SCHROEDER, one of Outagamie county's younger agriculturists, who is cultivating a nice property in Grand Chute township along scientific lines, is a native of this county, having been born in Freedom township, November 19, 1878, a son of Charles and Johannah (Beyer) Schroeder. Charles Schroeder was born August 22, 1824, in Mecklenburg, Germany, where he was married to Johannah Beyer, born at that place, November 13, 1834. They came to America in 1871, and located in Waukesha, Wisconsin, where they remained four years, and at the end of that time came to Outagamie county, Mr. Schroeder becoming a farmer and residing there until his death, August 3, 1900. He had a family of eight children: Charles, a retired citizen of Appleton; Sophia, wife of Henry Schabo, a contractor of Appleton; Frederick, who is deceased; Mary, the wife of Fred Schultz, a painter of Appleton; Eliza, deceased; Adam, deceased; and John, who is operating the old homestead in Freedom township. William Schroeder attended school in Freedom township, and at the age of eighteen years commenced working in a brick yard in Appleton in the summer months, and in the woods during the winters, so continuing to be occupied until his marriage. He then bought the ninety-five acres which he is now cultivating in Grand Chute township, and later added another tract of forty-one acres, and here he has carried on general farming to the present time, also engaging to some extent in dairy work. Since coming here he has devoted his entire attention to his farm, and the success which he has attained has justified the attention given to it. Mr. Schroeder was married October 18, 1894, to Miss Anna Launstein, and they have had four children, born as follows: Harvey, September 23, 1895; Alvin, January 21, 1897; Frances, July 24, 1898, and Eleanor, May 8, 1906 .

JOHN SCHEIBE, a well-known citizen and practical agriculturist of Grand Chute township, who is cultivating a farm of ninety-seven acres, was born in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, August 11, 1862, a son of Edward and Sophia (Ohrenberger) Scheibe, the former of whom was born April 1, 1833, in Saxony, Germany, and the latter in Wittenberg, Germany, May 3, 1839. Edward Scheibe came to America in 1854, and for four years was engaged in following the butcher's trade in Milwaukee, which he had learned in his native country. He then located on farming land in Milwaukee county, which he operated until 1871, and in that year settled in Freedom township, where he still resides. During the Civil War he served as a private in a Wisconsin volunteer regiment. His wife died April 13, 1900, having been the mother of the following children: Reynold, who resides on the old homestead; Herman, engaged in the blacksmith business at Apple Creek; John; Emma, who married John Westtreicher, a merchant of Evanston, Illinois; Laura, deceased; Edward, a resident of Freedom township; Robert, who also lives in Freedom township; Gustave, a merchant of Evanston, Illinois; and Ida, who is deceased. John Scheibe attended school in Freedom township, and at the age of twenty-one years began working at the carpenter's trade, following it for fourteen years, the first three years of which he spent under one employer. He then engaged in contracting on his own account, continuing in this line for eleven years, when he purchased a farm in Freedom township. After four years there he sold his property and bought the farm which he now owns, a fertile, well-kept tract of ninety-seven acres, on which he has carried on general farming to the present time. He is a Republican in his political views, but has not found time to engage actively in public matters. His religious connection is with St. Peter's Church, Freedom. On April 9, 1889, Mr. Scheibe was married to Sophia Launstein, born in Center township, Outagamie county, April 23, 1870, daughter of Ferdinand and Wilhelmina (Weggie) Launstein, natives of Germany. Mr. Launstein came to America with his parents when a small child, and grew to manhood in Milwaukee county, Wisconsin, where he bought a farm, and in 1868 came to Outagamie county, locating on a good farm near Apple Creek, where he is now living retired. Two children were born to him and his wife: Mrs. Scheibe, and Anna, wife of William Schroeder, living at Apple Creek. Mr. and Mrs. Scheibe have had seven children: Edward, residing at home; Adeline, the wife of Fred Buss, a farmer of Freedom township; Amanda and Esther, residing at home; Victor, who is deceased; and Chester and Archibald, residing at home .

JOHN VANDENHOY, a highly esteemed citizen of Grand Chute township, Outagamie county, who is engaged in farming on a fine property, is a native of Holland, where he was born July 10, 1845. He is a son of Theodore and Wilhelmina (Vanhoy) Vandenhoy, natives of that country, where the father carried on farming until 1870, and in that year the family came to the United States. On landing at New York, Mr. Vandenhoy's brother was taken sick and removed to a hospital, whence the father went to visit him and has never been heard from since. The family came on to Green Bay, Wisconsin, where they resided for two years and then went to Milwaukee. There the mother married again, and six months later went to a farm near Granville, Milwaukee county, this being her home for eighteen years, at the end of which time she came to the farm now owned by Mr. Vandenhoy, where she and her husband, John Heasacker, both died. The children born to Mr. and Mrs. Vandenhoy were: Dora, who is deceased; Hannah, the wife of Henry Hankens, a resident of St. Paul, Minnesota; Martin, who is deceased; and John. John Vandenhoy attended school in Granville, Milwankee county, and as a youth worked on the home farm. Later he rented the property, and at the time of his mother's death he came into possession of the eighty-seven acres, on which he has made numerous improvements. He has carried on general farming here, and his efforts have met with well-merited success. On November 21, 1883, he was married to Alice Guerts, who was born in Freedom township, Outagamie county, October 17, 1863, daughter of Jacob and Harriet (Weinan) Guerts, natives of Holland, who came to America after their marriage and located in Freedom township, where they resided during the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of four children: John, a resident of Freedom township; Anna, wife of Jacob Vanden Heavel, a farmer of Kaukauna township; Nellie, the wife of Henry Vanden Boogart, a resident of Crivitz, Marinette county; and Mrs. Vandenhoy. After her first husband's death, Mrs. Guerts married Albert Sanderfoots. Mr. and Mrs. Vandenhoy have had eight children, as follows: Mary, born January 5, 1885, wife of Charles Bender, a farmer of Grand Chute township; Jacob, born August 15, 1888, who died at the age of ten months; two children who died in infancy; Albert, who died aged three months; Minnie, born August 13, 1893, who died aged ten months; Anna, born April 17, 1895, and Albert (2), born May 9, 1898. Mr. Vandenhoy holds membership in St. Joseph's Roman Catholic Church and belongs to St. Joseph's Society. He is a Democrat.


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